Humane Letters 4 Literature   (#1005353)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

This course defines what students should understand and be able to do by the end of 12th grade. Knowledge acquisition should be the primary purpose of any reading approach as the systematic building of a wide range of knowledge across domains is a prerequisite to higher literacy. At this grade level, students are working with universal themes and archetypes. They are also continuing to build their facility with rhetoric, the craft of using language in writing and speaking, using classic literature, essays, and speeches as mentor texts.

This course is designed to be paired with Humane Letters 4 – History. Emphasizing the classical approach to teaching and learning, this course is devoted to reading, discussing, and writing based-on great works from Roman antiquity through the 19th century. In this course students strive to better understand the world around them through the evolution of the ideas of those who came before us. Through careful reading, thoughtful discussion, and persuasive writing, students will sharpen their abilities to think analytically and critically. Recommended texts for this course include, but are not limited to: Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Aquinas’ Treatise on Law, Dante’s Inferno, Machiavelli’s Prince, the philosophy of Descartes, and The Brothers Karamazov (The recommended texts list entirely overlaps with Humane Letters 4—History, but the two complementary courses make use of these texts for different purposes).  

The benchmarks in this course are mastery goals that students are expected to attain by the end of the year. To build mastery, students will continue to review and apply earlier grade-level benchmarks and expectations.

General Notes

English Language Arts is not a discrete set of skills, but a rich discipline with meaningful, significant content, the knowledge of which helps all students actively and fully participate in our society.

Standards should not stand alone as a separate focus for instruction, but should be combined purposefully.

The texts students read should be meaningful and thought-provoking, preparing them to be informed, civic-minded members of their community.

Curricular content for all subjects must integrate critical-thinking, problem-solving, and workforce-literacy skills; communication, reading, and writing skills; mathematics skills; collaboration skills; contextual and applied-learning skills; technology-literacy skills; information and media-literacy skills; and civic-engagement skills.

Instructional Practices

The recommended primary mode of instruction in Humane Letters is the seminar, supplemented with direct instruction through lecture or coaching. The seminar format requires that students participate actively in their search for the fullest understanding of the texts under examination. While the instructor serves as a guide in the learning process, the students and the instructor together investigate and explore the many complex ideas presented in the texts. Students are expected to follow these rules governing the seminar format:

  • Students must come to class having read the assignment in its entirety before they can participate in seminar discussion
  • Students must mentally prepare serious questions for the class to consider during discussion.
  • Each student must attend fully to the discussion at hand and refrain from carrying on side discussions.
  • Students must limit their comments only to the selection assigned for homework, or previously discussed passages.
  • Students must support their observations, arguments, or claims with specific textual evidence.

Literacy Standards in Social Studies:

Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: SS.pdf

General Information

Course Number: 1005353
Abbreviated Title: HUMANE LETTERS 4
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Draft - Course Pending Approval
Grade Level(s): 12
Graduation Requirement: English

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Word Prodigy: Using Context Clues:

Learn to use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn how to identify and apply three important types of context clues: synonyms, antonyms, and inferences. This tutorial features passages about some of the world's most incredible child prodigies.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Blasting Off with Active and Passive Voice:

Learn to distinguish between passive and active voice and how to revise sentences by changing them from passive voice to active voice in this interactive Space Race-themed tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part Three: Comparing Themes Across Two Poems:

Compare and contrast how William Wordsworth established multiple themes within two of his poems: "Lines Written in Early Spring" and "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud."

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part Two: Determining Multiple Themes of a Poem:

Continue to analyze William Wordsworth's poem "Lines Written in Early Spring" to determine multiple themes and craft thematic statements. 

This interactive tutorial is part 2 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part One: Identifying Multiple Topics in a Poem:

Study William Wordsworth's poem "Lines Written in Early Spring" to identify multiple topics and, in the next tutorial, to determine themes and craft thematic statements. 

This interactive tutorial is part 1 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Unconquered: Exploring Poetry:

Explore the poems "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley and "Life" by Charlotte Bronte in this interactive tutorial. Using these works of literature, you'll practice determining multiple themes in a poem and writing a summary of a poem. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Setting, Characters, Action: Creating Suspense in Dracula:

Read excerpts from Bram Stoker’s famous novel Dracula. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine how the author created suspense by tying together the story elements of setting, characters, and action. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Two Characters are Introduced in Things Fall Apart:

Read the first chapter from Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart about a father and son who couldn't be more different. In this interactive tutorial, you'll identify their important traits, examine the importance of their differences, and explain the impact of the author’s choice to introduce these two characters by highlighting their differences.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Unleashed:

Learn 15 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial! You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part Three:

Read and study excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia to analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This interactive, English Language Arts tutorial is Part Three of three. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Comma Usage:

Learn to use commas correctly to set off an introductory clause, phrase, or word at the start of a sentence with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Be Careful with Your Commas!:

Learn to use commas correctly with this interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll review a number of important comma rules, including when not to use a comma, and you'll learn to identify errors in comma usage. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part Two:

Analyze the impact of an author's choices using excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia. In this series of interactive tutorials, you'll analyze the impact of an author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This is the second tutorial in a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Mysterious Punctuation Marks—Part Two: Quotation Marks and the Dash:

Learn about two mysterious punctuation marks—quotation marks and the dash. As you complete this interactive tutorial, you'll learn a number of important rules and guidelines to help you correctly use them.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One to learn about the apostrophe and ellipsis.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reading into Words with Multiple Meanings:

Explore Robert Frost's poem "Mending Wall" and examine words, phrases, and lines with multiple meanings. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze how these multiple meanings can affect a reader’s interpretation of the poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Mysterious Punctuation Marks -- Part One:

Learn about four mysterious punctuation marks in this two-part interactive tutorial. In Part One, you'll learn important rules and guidelines to help you correctly use the apostrophe and the ellipsis. 

In Part Two, you'll learn to correctly use quotation marks and the dash. Make sure to complete both parts! Click  to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part One:

Read and study excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia to analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This interactive, English Language Arts tutorial is Part One of three. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comma Check: Putting Your Punctuation in Order:

Learn three rules for using commas correctly in your writing through use of this interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn how to join two independent clauses without creating a comma splice, how to identify and offset a nonessential clause in a sentence, and how to use the controversial Oxford comma. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Beauty and Word Choice – Part Two: "A Dream Within a Dream":

Explore Edgar Allan Poe's "A Dream Within a Dream" in this two-part series of interactive tutorials. In Part Two, you'll examine word choices, rhyme, and personification, and explain the impact of specific word choices on the meaning and beauty of the poem.

before starting Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Beauty and Word Choice – Part One: "A Dream Within a Dream":

Explore Edgar Allan Poe's "A Dream Within a Dream" in this two-part series of interactive tutorials. In Part 1, you'll examine words with multiple meanings and make inferences about selected key words in the poem. By the end of this series, you should be able to explain the impact of specific word choices on the meaning and beauty of the poem. 

After you complete Part One, .

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Color and Connotation in Ray Bradbury's "The Veldt":

Study excerpts from a suspenseful, science fiction short story in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you'll study excerpts from "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury. You'll study his use of color imagery, learn about the connotations of particular colors, and analyze the impact of color imagery on the meaning of the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Check it Out: Using Colons Correctly:

Learn about the ways to correctly use a colon in a sentence by exploring this interactive tutorial! We'll go over contexts where colon use is appropriate, and you'll learn guidelines for colon usage. You'll also learn several important rules for capitalization usage after a colon. By the end, you should be apply to apply these rules to correctly use a colon within a sentence. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Confusing Pronouns:

Examine some commonly confused pronouns that often trick people into believing that they have the same meaning when their meanings can be very different. This interactive tutorial will help you properly use the following pronouns: who, whom, which, that, their, there, they're.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Three:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read more excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will evaluate the effectiveness of his argument's structure. 

Make sure to complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three.

  • Click for Part One.
  • Click HERE for Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words Commonly Confused:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. Learn how to correctly use these commonly confused words to improve your language and writing skills.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Piece It Together: Understanding Semicolon Usage:

Learn three rules for semicolon usage in this interactive tutorial. We'll go over several contexts where semicolon use is appropriate, and you'll learn the guidelines for its usage. By the end, you should be able to apply these three rules to correctly use a semicolon within a sentence.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Commonly Confused Words:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help improve your writing and mastery of English.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Two:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will identify his use of rhetorical appeals and analyze the structure of his argument. 

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click  for Part One.

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE for Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from the opening sections of Ickes’ speech. Then, you will work on determining his purpose, point of view, and important claims in these sections.  

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click to view Part Two. Click HERE to view Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Complex Usage: Which Word Will Win?:

Examine five pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial focuses on language and resolving issues of complex usage. You will examine pairs of words that are often confused in order to learn the correct use of each word. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to accurately use these ten commonly confused words. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Word Doubles:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine fourteen homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common usage mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Homophones:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine eleven homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common usage mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words that Confuse:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine twelve homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common usage mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Four:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. In part 4 of this four-part, interactive tutorial series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Three:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. This tutorial is Part 3 of a 4-part series. By the end of this series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Two:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. This tutorial is Part Two in a four-part series. By the end of this tutorial series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part One:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. This tutorial is Part 1 of a four-part series. By the end of this series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Discovering the Treasure of Sentence Variety: Part 2:

Ahoy, mateys! In Part Two of this two-part tutorial series, you will learn about syntax and the ways in which writing with varied syntax can affect the meaning of a text. You will practice identifying simple, compound, and complex sentence structures and analyze the effect of these different types of structures on the meaning of a text. You will also practice writing using varied syntax. This two-part series examines different types of sentences from the novel Treasure Island.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two! Click  to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Discovering the Treasure of Sentence Variety: Part 1:

Ahoy, mateys! Learn about syntax and the ways in which writing with varied syntax can affect the meaning of a text. In this two-part interactive tutorial you will learn about syntax: the arrangement of words in a sentence or word order. You will practice identifying simple, compound, and complex sentence structures and analyze the effect of these different types of structures on the meaning of a text. You will also practice writing using varied syntax. This two-part series examines different types of sentences from the novel Treasure Island

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click  for Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reaching New Heights: Determining Multiple Themes in a Poem:

Learn how to determine themes and write thematic statements in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you'll examine three famous poems: “If-” by Rudyard Kipling, “A Psalm of Life” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley. Using these works of literature, you will practice determining multiple themes in a poem and crafting thematic statements.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Playing with Words: Changing Word Forms:

Learn how to transform words into other words, including nouns into verbs, verbs into adjectives, adjectives into adverbs, and much more with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Mastery:

Acquire 15 new vocabulary words, identify their parts of speech, synonyms, and antonyms, and use them in context with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part Two):

Learn how to identify use of verbal and dramatic irony in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" in this interactive, two-part tutorial. Students will also examine how Poe's use of irony with first person point of view affects the story. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In Part One, students read and analyzed the first two excerpts from the story. In Part Two, students will read and analyze the last three excerpts from the story.

Click below to open Part One. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part 1 of 2):

Learn how to identify use of verbal and dramatic irony in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" in this interactive two-part tutorial. You'll also examine how Poe's use of irony with first person point of view affects the story. You'll read and analyze the first two excerpts from the story in part one, and the last three excerpts from the story in part two.

Click below to open part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hurston and Hughes: Analyzing Topics and Themes - Part 2:

Read an excerpt from "Freedom's Plow," a poem by Langston Hughes and identify topics and determine themes of that poem in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second part of a two-part series in which students will analyze works by Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes. In the final practice in this second tutorial, students will compare and contrast the two writers’ treatment of a similar topic and theme.

Part One should be completed before Part Two. Click to view  in this two-part series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Not? Part 2 :

Examine text excerpts from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and evaluate several film clips based on different adaptations of Shelley's novel in this two-part, interactive tutorial. By the end of this two-part tutorial, you should be able to analyze how the films’ various adaptations of the novel changes the audience’s perception of the creature that Mary Shelley originally created. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series.

Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hurston and Hughes: Analyzing Topics and Themes (Part 1 of 2):

Learn about two writers of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes, in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series. In part one, you will read samples of Hurston's work and identify topics and determine themes. In part two, you will do the same for Langston Hughes, and then you will compare and contrast the two writers’ treatment of a similar topic and theme.

Click below to open part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Not? Part 1 of 2:

Examine text excerpts from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and evaluate several film clips based on different adaptations of Shelley's novel in this two-part interactive tutorial. By the end of this two-part series, you should be able to analyze how the films’ various adaptations of the novel changes the audience’s perception of the creature Mary Shelley originally created.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hallowed Words: Evaluating a Speaker's Effectiveness:

Examine the hallowed words of Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address." In this interactive tutorial you'll identify his point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to evaluate his effectiveness as a speaker.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 2:

Practice literacy skills while learning more about the Pullman Strike of 1894 in this interactive tutorial.

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Click to launch Part 1 where you'll learn the history behind the same event.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 1:

Learn the history behind the Pullman Strike of 1894 in part 1 of this interactive tutorial.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literacy skills while learning more about the same event! 

Click  to open part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Examine a famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln, his 2nd Inaugural Address. This speech, given a month before his assassination, is considered by many to be one of his most eloquent and moving speeches. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to determine Lincoln's purpose for his 2nd Inaugural Address, analyze his word choice, and identify his use of parallel structure. Finally, you should be able to put all of these things together to analyze how Lincoln's word choice and use of parallel structure contributed to the purpose for his speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Streamlining Sentences: Using Hyphens :

Learn how to use the hyphen in this interactive tutorial about sharks species!  You'll learn rules and strategies for the proper use of this misunderstood punctuation mark.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary in Action (Grades 11-12):

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn the definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Language Liaisons: A Relationship Between Words:

Explore word relationships by identifying and interpreting some figures of speech in context and analyzing the role or purpose they play in the text. In this interactive tutorial you will examine several kinds of figures of speech, including hyperbole and paradox. You'll also analyze nuances in the meanings of words with similar denotations or definitions. Several excerpts used in this tutorial come from works by William Shakespeare.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Power:

Acquire 15 new vocabulary words, identify their parts of speech, synonyms, and antonyms, and use them in context with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What the Dead Can Teach Us:

Learn to distinguish what is directly stated from what is really meant when working to analyze point of view in a text. In this interactive tutorial you'll examine humorous epitaphs from Edgar Lee Masters’ Spoon River Anthology to interpret an author’s true point of view based on the specific tools employed and the way they are presented in a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Nature of Words: Nuances, Relationships & Meanings:

Explore the work of poet William Blake as you examine word choice, word relationships, nuances in the meaning of words, and the use of figurative language with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Into the Wild: Close Encounters with Unfamiliar Words:

Learn several strategies for determining the meaning of unfamiliar words as you read about the late Dian Fossey's research on mountain gorillas. This interactive tutorial will also help you identify common prefixes and how they affect the meaning of words.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Story Elements Can Affect the Meaning of a Text:

Analyze how an author’s choices about character introductions, story setting, and the order of action can impact the meaning of a text using excerpts from the novel Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Dynamic English:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text.

Define some of the conventions of Modern English and compare modern usage to earlier conventions. You should be able to identify some of the fundamental differences between written and spoken English. You should also be able to recognize differences between standard and disputed language use and classify the conventions of a language. Finally, you should be able to identify changes in Standard English conventions based on your understanding of modern conventions, as well as the conventions of earlier forms of English.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Joy that Kills:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text. You should also be able to use strong and appropriate evidence from the text to support your analysis. Finally, you should be able to identify what the author leaves vague or unclear and then determine what additional information would be helpful to clarify the uncertainties in the text. In this tutorial you will apply these skills to a fictional short story titled “The Story of an Hour” written by Kate Chopin.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Do I Love Thee?: Examining Word Choice, Tone, and Meaning in Poetry:

Learn how the choice of words and phrases in a poem impacts the overall meaning and tone. In this interactive tutorial you'll examine Sonnet 43, “How Do I Love Thee?” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and engage in a critical analysis of the language, reflect on your own interpretations, and write about what you have learned.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.