English 3 Through ESOL   (#1002320)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

The purpose of this course is to enable students who are native speakers of languages other than English to develop proficient listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the English language. Emphasis will be on acquisition of integrated English communication skills in a wide range of content and activities using texts of high complexity to ensure college and career preparation and readiness.

General Notes

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
  • active reading of varied texts for what they say explicitly, as well as the logical inferences that can be drawn
  • analysis of literature and informational texts from varied literary periods to examine:

    • text craft and structure
    • elements of literature
    • arguments and claims supported by textual evidence
    • power and impact of language
    • influence of history, culture, and setting on language
    • personal critical and aesthetic response
  • writing for varied purposes
    • developing and supporting argumentative claims
    • crafting coherent, supported informative/expository texts
    • responding to literature for personal and analytical purposes
    • writing narratives to develop real or imagined events
    • writing to sources using text- based evidence and reasoning
  • effective listening, speaking, and viewing strategies with emphasis on the use of evidence to support or refute a claim in multimedia presentations, class discussions, and extended text discussions
  • collaboration amongst peers
Special Notes:
Instructional Practices:
Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any purpose. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning.
  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages, as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/la.pdf

Qualifications

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any World Language certification plus English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Endorsement.

General Information

Course Number: 1002320
Abbreviated Title: ENG 3 THROUGH ESOL
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12
Graduation Requirement: English

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Word Prodigy: Using Context Clues:

Learn to use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn how to identify and apply three important types of context clues: synonyms, antonyms, and inferences. This tutorial features passages about some of the world's most incredible child prodigies.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Blasting Off with Active and Passive Voice:

Learn to distinguish between passive and active voice and how to revise sentences by changing them from passive voice to active voice in this interactive Space Race-themed tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part Three: Comparing Themes Across Two Poems:

Compare and contrast how William Wordsworth established multiple themes within two of his poems: "Lines Written in Early Spring" and "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud."

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part Two: Determining Multiple Themes of a Poem:

Continue to analyze William Wordsworth's poem "Lines Written in Early Spring" to determine multiple themes and craft thematic statements. 

This interactive tutorial is part 2 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part One: Identifying Multiple Topics in a Poem:

Study William Wordsworth's poem "Lines Written in Early Spring" to identify multiple topics and, in the next tutorial, to determine themes and craft thematic statements. 

This interactive tutorial is part 1 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Unconquered: Exploring Poetry:

Explore the poems "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley and "Life" by Charlotte Brontë in this interactive tutorial. Using these works of literature, you'll practice determining multiple themes in a poem and writing a summary of a poem. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Setting, Characters, Action: Creating Suspense in Dracula:

Read excerpts from Bram Stoker’s famous novel Dracula. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine how the author created suspense by tying together the story elements of setting, characters, and action. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Two Characters are Introduced in Things Fall Apart:

Read the first chapter from Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart about a father and son who couldn't be more different. In this interactive tutorial, you'll identify their important traits, examine the importance of their differences, and explain the impact of the author’s choice to introduce these two characters by highlighting their differences.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Unleashed:

Learn 15 new academic vocabulary words in this interactive tutorial! You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part Three:

Read and study excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia to analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This interactive English Language Arts tutorial is Part Three of three. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Comma Usage:

Learn to use commas correctly to set off an introductory clause, phrase, or word at the start of a sentence with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Be Careful with Your Commas!:

Learn to use commas correctly with this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll review a number of important comma rules, including when not to use a comma, and you'll learn to identify errors in comma usage. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part Two:

Analyze the impact of an author's choices using excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia. In this series of interactive tutorials, you'll analyze the impact of an author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This is the second tutorial in a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Mysterious Punctuation Marks—Part Two: Quotation Marks and the Dash:

Learn about two mysterious punctuation marks: quotation marks and the dash. As you complete this interactive tutorial, you'll learn a number of important rules and guidelines to help you use them correctly.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One to learn about the apostrophe and the ellipsis.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reading into Words with Multiple Meanings:

Explore Robert Frost's poem "Mending Wall" and examine words, phrases, and lines with multiple meanings. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze how these multiple meanings can affect a reader’s interpretation of the poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Mysterious Punctuation Marks -- Part One:

Learn about four mysterious punctuation marks in this two-part interactive tutorial. In Part One, you'll learn important rules and guidelines to help you correctly use the apostrophe and the ellipsis. 

In Part Two, you'll learn to correctly use quotation marks and the dash. Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part One:

Read and study excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia to analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This interactive English Language Arts tutorial is Part One of three. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comma Check: Putting Your Punctuation in Order:

Learn three rules for using commas correctly in your writing through use of this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn how to join two independent clauses without creating a comma splice, how to identify and offset a nonessential clause in a sentence, and how to use the controversial Oxford comma. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Beauty and Word Choice – Part Two: "A Dream Within a Dream":

Explore Edgar Allan Poe's "A Dream Within a Dream" in this two-part series of interactive tutorials. In Part Two, you'll examine word choices, rhyme, and personification, and explain the impact of specific word choices on the meaning and beauty of the poem.

Click HERE to launch Part One before starting Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Beauty and Word Choice – Part One: "A Dream Within a Dream":

Explore Edgar Allan Poe's "A Dream Within a Dream" in this two-part series of interactive tutorials. In Part 1, you'll examine words with multiple meanings and make inferences about selected key words in the poem. By the end of this series, you should be able to explain the impact of specific word choices on the meaning and beauty of the poem. 

After you complete Part One, click HERE to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Determining Point of View and Its Effect on a Text:

Read excerpts from E.B. White's moving personal essay "Once More to the Lake." In this tutorial, you will determine an author’s personal point of view and examine how it contributes to the beauty of a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Check it Out: Using Colons Correctly:

Learn about the ways to correctly use a colon in a sentence by exploring this interactive tutorial! We'll go over contexts where colon use is appropriate, and you'll learn guidelines for colon usage. You'll also learn several important rules for capitalization usage after a colon. By the end, you should be apply to apply these rules to correctly use a colon within a sentence. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Confusing Pronouns:

Examine some commonly confused pronouns that often trick people into believing that they have the same meaning when their meanings can be very different. This interactive tutorial will help you properly use the following pronouns: who, whom, which, that, their, there, they're.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Three:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read more excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will evaluate the effectiveness of his argument's structure. 

Be sure to complete the first two parts before completing Part Three.

Click HERE for Part One. Click HERE for Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words Commonly Confused:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. Learn how to correctly use these commonly confused words to improve your language and writing skills.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Piece It Together: Understanding Semicolon Usage:

Learn and practice how to use semicolons in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn three important rules for using the semicolon to join clauses together. By the end, you should be able to apply these three rules to correctly use a semicolon within a sentence.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Commonly Confused Words:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help improve your writing and mastery of English.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Two:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will identify his use of rhetorical appeals and analyze the structure of his argument. 

Make sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE for Part One.

Click HERE for Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from the opening sections of Ickes’ speech. Then, you will work on determining his purpose, point of view, and important claims in these sections.  

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE to view Part Two. Click HERE to view Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Complex Usage: Which Word Will Win?:

Examine five pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial focuses on language and resolving issues of complex usage. You will examine pairs of words that are often confused in order to learn the correct use of each word. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to accurately use these ten commonly confused words. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Word Doubles:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine fourteen homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common usage mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Homophones:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine eleven homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common usage mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words that Confuse:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine twelve homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common usage mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part series. This tutorial is Part Two. In this tutorial, you will continue to examine excerpts from Emerson's essay that focus on the topic of traveling. You'll examine word meanings and determine the connotations of specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of this portion of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part interactive tutorial series. You will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about the emotions or associations that are connected to specific words. Finally, you will analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of these excerpts.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. This tutorial is Part Two. In this two-part series, you will learn to enhance your experience of Emerson's essay by analyzing his use of the word "genius." You will analyze Emerson's figurative meaning of "genius" and how he develops and refines the meaning of this word over the course of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Four:

Having studied two key topics in excerpts from the classic novel Pride and Prejudice in previous parts of this tutorial series, in Part Four you will use these topics and textual details from the novel to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. In Part One, you’ll learn to enhance your experience of a text by analyzing its use of a word’s figurative meaning. Specifically, you'll examine Emerson's figurative meaning of the key term "genius." In Part Two, you’ll learn how to track the development of a word’s figurative meaning over the course of a text. 

Make sure to complete both parts of the tutorial! Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Three:

Continue to explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics in Part Three of this four-part series. By the end of this series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Two:

Explore two key topics (first impressions and self-awareness) in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. This tutorial is Part Two in a four-part series. By the end of this tutorial series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part One:

Explore two key topics in excerpts from Jane Austen's classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics in Part One of this four-part interactive tutorial series. By the end of this series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel and analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Click below to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Discovering the Treasure of Sentence Variety: Part 2:

Ahoy, mateys! In Part Two of this two-part tutorial series, you will learn about syntax and the ways in which writing with varied syntax can affect the meaning of a text. You will practice identifying simple, compound, and complex sentence structures and analyze the effect of these different types of structures on the meaning of a text. You will also practice writing using varied syntax. This two-part series examines different types of sentences from the novel Treasure Island.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two! Click  to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Discovering the Treasure of Sentence Variety: Part 1:

Ahoy, mateys! Learn about syntax and the ways in which writing with varied syntax can affect the meaning of a text. In this two-part interactive tutorial you will learn about syntax: the arrangement of words in a sentence or word order. You will practice identifying simple, compound, and complex sentence structures and analyze the effect of these different types of structures on the meaning of a text. You will also practice writing using varied syntax. This two-part series examines different types of sentences from the novel Treasure Island

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click  for Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reaching New Heights: Determining Multiple Themes in a Poem:

Learn how to determine themes and write thematic statements in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you'll examine three famous poems: “If-” by Rudyard Kipling, “A Psalm of Life” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley. Using these works of literature, you will practice determining multiple themes in a poem and crafting thematic statements.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Playing with Words: Changing Word Forms:

Learn how to transform words into other words, including nouns into verbs, verbs into adjectives, adjectives into adverbs, and much more with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Mastery:

Acquire 15 new vocabulary words, identify their parts of speech, synonyms, and antonyms, and use them in context with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part Two):

Learn how to identify use of verbal and dramatic irony in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" in this interactive two-part tutorial. Students will also examine how Poe's use of irony with first person point of view affects the story. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In Part One, students read and analyzed the first two excerpts from the story. In Part Two, students will read and analyze the last three excerpts from the story.

Make sure to complete Part One first! Click HERE to complete Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part 1 of 2):

Learn how to identify use of verbal and dramatic irony in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" in this interactive two-part tutorial. You'll also examine how Poe's use of irony with first person point of view affects the story. You'll read and analyze the first two excerpts from the story in Part One, and the last three excerpts from the story in Part Two.

Be sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hurston and Hughes: Analyzing Topics and Themes (Part 2 of 2):

Learn about two significant writers of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neal Hurston and Langston Hughes. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts of texts from each author. In Part One, you practiced identifying topics and determining themes using Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. In Part Two, you'll read Hughes' poem "Freedom's Plow" to compare and contrast the authors' treatment of a similar topic and theme. Make sure to complete both parts.

Click here to launch PART ONE.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Not? Part 2 :

Examine text excerpts from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and evaluate several film clips based on different adaptations of Shelley's novel in this two-part interactive tutorial. By the end of this two-part tutorial, you should be able to analyze how the films’ various adaptations of the novel changes the audience’s perception of the creature that Mary Shelley originally created. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series.

Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hurston and Hughes: Analyzing Topics and Themes (Part 1 of 2):

Learn about two significant writers of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neal Hurston and Langston Hughes. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts of texts from each author. In Part One, you'll practice identifying topics and determining themes using Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. In Part Two, you'll read Hughes' poem "Freedom's Plow" to compare and contrast the authors' treatment of a similar topic and theme.

Click here to launch PART TWO.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Not? Part 1 of 2:

Examine text excerpts from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and evaluate several film clips based on different adaptations of Shelley's novel in this two-part interactive tutorial. By the end of this two-part series, you should be able to analyze how the films’ various adaptations of the novel changes the audience’s perception of the creature Mary Shelley originally created.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hallowed Words: Evaluating a Speaker's Effectiveness:

Learn how to evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" and evaluate the effectiveness of his words by analyzing his use of reasoning and evidence. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

In the Driver's Seat!:

Learn how to identify the strengths and weaknesses of sources to use in your writing. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn to evaluate sources based on their relation to the audience, task, and purpose of your writing. You'll also practice determining whether potential sources are useful, relevant, and authoritative for your specific topic.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Practice analyzing an informational text using President Abraham Lincoln's 2nd Inaugural Address. In this interactive tutorial, you'll determine Lincoln's purpose in this historical speech. You'll also analyze how his specific word choice and use of parallel structure help support his purpose.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Streamlining Sentences: Using Hyphens :

Learn how to use the hyphen in this interactive tutorial about sharks! You'll learn rules and strategies for the proper use of this often misunderstood punctuation mark.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary in Action:

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn the definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Language Liaisons: A Relationship Between Words:

Explore word relationships by identifying and interpreting various figures of speech in context. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze the use of several kinds of figures of speech, including hyperbole and paradox. You'll also analyze the nuances in the meaning of words with similar definitions. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Power:

Acquire 15 new vocabulary words, identify their parts of speech, synonyms, and antonyms, and use them in context with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reader Reflections: Text Structures and Complex Ideas:

Learn to identify common text structures used in nonfiction texts: problem/solution, definition/example, cause and effect, and compare and contrast. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read excerpts from Walden by Henry David Thoreau and examine how complex ideas can be expressed using various text structures.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What the Dead Can Teach Us:

Learn to analyze the use of irony to distinguish what is directly stated from what is really meant within the text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine humorous epitaphs from Edgar Lee Masters’ Spoon River Anthology. You'll learn to interpret an author’s true feelings and intentions versus what is actually stated in the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Purpose and Rhetoric: Analyzing Civil Disobedience:

Learn about the rhetorical techniques used by Henry David Thoreau in his influential essay Civil Disobedience.  In this interactive tutorial, you'll cover some important background information on Thoreau and this classic essay. You'll examine Thoreau's purpose for writing and identify his use of specific rhetorical techniques, including the use of allusions, metaphors, and rhetorical questions.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Nature of Words: Nuances, Relationships & Meanings:

Explore the work of poet William Blake as you examine word choice, word relationships, nuances in the meaning of words, and the use of figurative language with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drawing Evidence for Analysis and Reflection:

Learn to draw appropriate text evidence to support your written response to analysis and reflection prompts. In this interactive tutorial, you'll be working with excerpts from two of George Orwell’s works: 1984 and “Shooting an Elephant.” You'll practice identifying important evidence in the text to support your own thoughts and ideas.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Best Left Unsaid: Determining Matters of Brevity and Clarity:

We will break down the work of one of America's best wordsmiths, Ambrose Bierce, who was famous for his witty wordplay and use of satire, to practice a variety of skills using his essay "For Brevity and Clarity." By the end of this tutorial you should be able to cite textual evidence to prove what an author has stated directly, cite textual evidence to support inferences drawn from a text, distinguish what is indirectly stated in a text through the author's use of satire, and make inferences supported by textual evidence to determine ambiguities in a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Into the Wild: Close Encounters with Unfamiliar Words:

Learn several strategies for determining the meaning of unfamiliar words as you read about the late Dian Fossey's research on mountain gorillas. This interactive tutorial will also help you identify common prefixes and how they affect the meaning of words.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Story Elements Can Affect the Meaning of a Text:

Analyze how an author’s choices about character introductions, story setting, and the order of action can impact the meaning of a text using excerpts from the novel Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Clarence Darrow's Leopold and Loeb Speech:

Learn how to provide a complex analysis of two or more central ideas in a nonfiction text. Reading for this purpose will support your ability to evaluate and critically examine the central ideas an author wants to convey to the reader through the text. As part of this, you will be able to analyze how the author’s central ideas develop over the course of the text and describe how they interact and build on one another in support of the larger central ideas. This tutorial utilizes an excerpt from the closing arguments by Clarence Darrow at the trial of Leopold and Loeb.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Dynamic English:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text.

Define some of the conventions of Modern English and compare modern usage to earlier conventions. You should be able to identify some of the fundamental differences between written and spoken English. You should also be able to recognize differences between standard and disputed language use and classify the conventions of a language. Finally, you should be able to identify changes in Standard English conventions based on your understanding of modern conventions, as well as the conventions of earlier forms of English.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Joy That Kills:

Learn how to make inferences when reading a fictional text using the textual evidence provided. In this tutorial, you'll read the short story "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin. You'll practice identifying what is directly stated in the text and what requires the use of inference. You'll practice making your own inferences and supporting them with evidence from the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Do I Love Thee?: Examining Word Choice, Tone, and Meaning in Poetry:

Learn how the meaning and tone of a poem is shaped by the author's specific word choice. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read Sonnet 43 (“How Do I Love Thee?”) by Elizabeth Barrett Browning. You'll examine how her specific word choice affects the overall tone and meaning of the poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Color and Connotation in Ray Bradbury's "The Veldt":

Study excerpts from a suspenseful science fiction short story in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you'll study excerpts from "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury. You'll study his use of color imagery, learn about the connotations of particular colors, and analyze the impact of color imagery on the meaning of the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Student Center Activity

Edcite: ELA Reading Grade 11:

Students can practice answering reading comprehension questions with engaging texts on the history of women's athletics. With an account, students can save their work and send it to their teacher when complete.

Type: Student Center Activity

Tutorials

How to Avoid Plagiarism:

This tutorial from the University of Maryland University College's Writing Center will help you understand and evaluate three ways to use source material: quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing. The resource also provides guidelines to help you avoid even unintentional plagiarism mistakes. Once you complete the interactive exercises and answer every question on the final quiz correctly, you will receive a printable certificate of completion. Simply click on the hyperlink for the Interactive Version to begin.

Type: Tutorial

Proper Techniques for Research and Writing:

This tutorial provides you with step-by-step instructions for all aspects of writing a research paper and includes a comprehensive list of links to various style guides. Quizzes are also provided for self-assessment. Simply click start at the bottom of the home page to begin the presentation. If you want to only use portions of the tutorial, use the scroll down menu from the Jump To section located at the top of each presentation slide.

Type: Tutorial

Selling Yourself: Resume Generator:

In this tutorial from ReadWriteThink.org you will learn how to create a professional resume that showcases your talents and skills. This interactive site offers both chronological (if you have lots of work experience) or functional (if you have little work experience) templates to guide you through the development of your resume and offers helpful tips at each step of the process. When you are finished, you can print, save or email your resume.

Type: Tutorial

Purdue OWL: Personal Statement:

In this vidcast from the Purdue Online Writing Lab, you will learn how to write your personal statement for your college application. Further, you will be able to write for a specific audience while adhering to particular guidelines for your format and style. Note- the vidcast may take a minute or two to load.

Type: Tutorial

Guide to Grammar and Writing: Principles of Composition:

This is a comprehensive guide that can help students with writing. This resource includes materials that will help students write in different formats, including personal essays, cause/effect papers, essays about literature, and research papers. There are materials that will help students with different aspects of the writing process, including how to develop an introduction or conclusion, how to write a thesis statement, and how to effectively use transitions.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.