M/J Research 1 (#1700000) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
LAFS.6.L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  1. Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).
  2. Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).
  3. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.
  4. Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).
  5. Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others' writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.
LAFS.6.L.1.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  1. Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.
  2. Spell correctly.
LAFS.6.RI.3.8: Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
LAFS.6.RI.3.9: Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
LAFS.6.RL.1.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
LAFS.6.RL.1.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
LAFS.6.SL.1.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
  2. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
  3. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.
  4. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing.
LAFS.6.SL.2.4: Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
LAFS.6.W.1.1: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  1. Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
  2. Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

LAFS.6.W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
  1. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
  3. Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

LAFS.6.W.3.8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources.
LAFS.6.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  1. Apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics”).
  2. Apply grade 6 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not”).
LAFS.6.W.4.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
LAFS.68.RH.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
LAFS.68.RST.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.
LAFS.68.RST.1.2: Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
MAFS.K12.MP.1.1:

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1:

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.6.1:

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

SS.6.W.1.4: Describe the methods of historical inquiry and how history relates to the other social sciences.
Clarifications:
Examples are archaeology, geography, political science, economics.
SS.6.W.1.5: Describe the roles of historians and recognize varying historical interpretations (historiography).
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
SC.6.N.1.1: Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop basic knowledge and skills in the research process with emphasis on determining and refining research questions.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
-research process
-research topics
-research questions and hypotheses
-definition, analysis, and evaluation of research questions
-review of literature and other resources
-formulation of hypotheses
-report formats, styles, and content
-directed investigations
-critical analysis of research
-a major research project, preferably cross-disciplinary

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf


QUALIFICATIONS

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any field when certification reflects a bachelor or higher degree.


General Information

Course Number: 1700000 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 6 to 8 Education Courses > Subject: Research and Critical Thinking > SubSubject: General >
Abbreviated Title: M/J RESEARCH 1
Course Attributes:
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 6,7,8



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