Basic Skills in Reading-K-2 (#5010020) 


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Course Standards


Name Description
ELA.1.F.1.1: Locate the title, table of contents, names of author(s) and illustrator(s), and glossary of books.

Standard Relation to Course: Major

ELA.1.F.1.2: Demonstrate phonological awareness.
  1. Segment spoken words into initial, medial, and final phonemes, including words with digraphs, blends, and trigraphs. 
  2. Orally blend initial, medial, and final phonemes together to produce a single-syllable word that includes digraphs, blends, or trigraphs.
  3. Blend single-syllable spoken words with at least five phonemes.
  4. Segment single-syllable spoken words with at least five phonemes.
  5. Segment and blend phonemes in multi-syllable spoken words.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Phonological awareness only refers to what can be done orally at both the sound and syllabic level. This includes isolating sounds, blending sounds, and orally segmenting words based on syllables. It does not involve print or letter knowledge.

Standard Relation to Course: Major

ELA.1.F.1.3: Use knowledge of grade-appropriate phonics and word-analysis skills to decode words accurately. 
  1. Decode words using knowledge of spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs, trigraphs, and blends. 
  2. Decode simple words with r-controlled vowels.  
  3. Decode and encode regularly spelled one-syllable words. 
  4. Decode words with inflectional endings. 
  5. Decode two-syllable words with regular patterns by breaking the words into syllables. 
  6. Decode words that use final –e and vowel teams to make long-vowel sound. 
Clarifications:

Clarification 1: Phonics refers to the relationship between graphemes (letters or letter combinations) and phonemes (speech sounds).

Clarification 2: Students will decode decodable high frequency words appropriate to the grade level. See 1.F.1.4 and Dolch and Fry word lists. Students will read grade-level appropriate high frequency words, decodable or not, with automaticity.

Standard Relation to Course: Major

ELA.1.F.1.4: Read grade-level texts with accuracy, automaticity, and appropriate prosody or expression.
  1. Recognize and read with automaticity the grade-level sight words.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: See Dolch and Fry word lists. 
Clarification 2: Many of the high frequency words at this grade level are either irregularly spelled and therefore not decodable or are temporarily irregular, meaning that students have not yet learned the phonics rule that would enable them to decode the word. Those words that are decodable should be introduced to students using appropriate phonics rules. See 1.F.1.3. Students will read grade-level appropriate high frequency words, decodable or not, with automaticity. 
Clarification 3: See Fluency Norms for grade-level norms. Norms are expressed as words correct per minute (WCPM), a measure that combines accuracy with speed. 
Clarification 4: “Appropriate prosody” refers to pausing patterns during oral reading that reflect the punctuation and meaning of a text. See Sample Oral Reading Fluency Rubrics for prosody. 
Clarification 5: Grade-level texts, for the purposes of fluency, are those within the grade band on quantitative text complexity measures and appropriate in content and qualitative measures.

Standard Relation to Course: Major

ELA.1.R.1.1: Identify and describe the main story elements in a story.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Main story elements for the purpose of this benchmark are the setting, characters, and sequence of events of a story. 

Clarification 2: In describing the characters, students can describe appearance, actions, feelings, and thoughts of the characters. Students will explain what in the text their description is based on. 

Clarification 3: For setting, students will discuss where the events of the story are happening. The time element of setting should only be addressed in texts where it is explicitly indicated.

ELA.1.R.1.2: Identify and explain the moral of a story.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: This benchmark introduces the moral of a story as a precursor to theme in 2nd grade. A moral is the lesson of a story. During instruction, let students know that not all stories have a lesson by referring to stories read that did not have a moral or a lesson.
ELA.1.R.1.3: Explain who is telling the story using context clues.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Students will use the term “narrator” to refer to the speaker telling the story. Students will determine if the narrator is a character in the story or a speaker outside of the story. Students will give reasons why they know who is speaking.
ELA.1.R.1.4: Identify stanzas and line breaks in poems.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: This benchmark can be paired with R.1.1, R.1.2, R.1.3 and R.3.2 for instruction with story poems.
ELA.1.R.2.1: Use text features including titles, headings, captions, graphs, maps, glossaries, and/or illustrations to demonstrate understanding of texts.
ELA.1.R.2.2: Identify the topic of and relevant details in a text.
ELA.1.R.2.3: Explain similarities and differences between information provided in visuals and words in an informational text.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: When explaining similarities and differences, students will also explain how the visuals and words help the reader make sense of the topic. 

Clarification 2: During instruction, give students opportunities to see visual representations of similarities and differences using tools such as Venn diagrams or T-charts.

ELA.1.R.2.4: Identify an author’s opinion(s) about the topic.
ELA.1.R.3.1: Identify and explain descriptive words and phrases in text(s).
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Continue to expose students to the academic vocabulary word “adjective.” Discussion should focus on how the descriptive words add meaning to the text.
ELA.1.R.3.2: Retell a text in oral or written form to enhance comprehension.
  1. Use main story elements at the beginning, middle, and end for a literary text.
  2. Use topic and important details for an informational text.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Most grade-level texts are appropriate for this benchmark.
ELA.1.R.3.3: Compare and contrast two texts on the same topic.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Students are being asked to compare and contrast. During instruction, give students opportunities to see visual representations of similarities and differences using tools such as Venn diagrams or T-charts.
ELA.1.V.1.1: Use grade-level academic vocabulary appropriately in speaking and writing.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Grade-level academic vocabulary consists of words that are likely to appear across subject areas for the current grade level and beyond, are vital to comprehension, critical for academic discussions and writing, and usually require explicit instruction.

Standard Relation to Course: Major

ELA.1.V.1.2: Identify and use frequently occurring base words and their common inflections in grade-level content.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: See Base Words for frequently occurring base words. 

Clarification 2: Inflectional endings, the inflections referred to here, are added to the end of a word to add additional information. 

Example: Regular verbs add the inflectional ending -ed to indicate the past tense.

Standard Relation to Course: Major

ELA.1.V.1.3: Identify and use picture clues, context clues, word relationships, reference materials, and/or background knowledge to determine the meaning of unknown words.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Instruction for this benchmark should include text read-alouds and think-alouds aimed at building and activating background knowledge. Review of words learned in this way is critical to building background knowledge and related vocabulary. Texts read aloud can be two grade levels higher than student reading level. 

Clarification 2: See Context Clues and Word Relationships.

ELA.2.F.1.3: Use knowledge of grade-appropriate phonics and word-analysis skills to decode words.
  1. Decode words with variable vowel teams (e.g., oo, ea, ou) and vowel diphthongs (e.g., oi, oy, ow).
  2. Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long and short vowels.
  3. Decode words with open (e.g., hi, baby, moment) and closed (e.g., bag, sunshine, chop) syllables and consonant -le (e.g., purple, circle, stumble).
  4. Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.
  5. Decode words with silent letter combinations (e.g., knight, comb, island, ghost).

 

Clarifications:

Clarification 1: Phonics refers to the relationship between graphemes (letters or letter combinations) and phonemes (speech sounds). 

Clarification 2: Students will decode decodable high frequency words appropriate to the grade level. See 2.F.1.4 and Dolch and Fry word lists. Students will read grade-level appropriate high frequency words, decodable or not, with automaticity.

ELA.2.F.1.4: Read grade-level texts with accuracy, automaticity, and appropriate prosody or expression.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: See Dolch and Fry word lists.

Clarification 2: Many of the high frequency words at this grade level are either irregularly spelled and therefore not decodable or are temporarily irregular, meaning that students have not yet learned the phonics rule that would enable them to decode the word. Those words that are decodable should be introduced to students using appropriate phonics rules. See 2.F.1.3. Students will read grade-level appropriate high frequency words, decodable or not, with automaticity.

Clarification 3: See Fluency Norms for grade-level norms. Norms are expressed as words correct per minute (WCPM), a measure that combines accuracy with rate.

Clarification 4: Appropriate prosody refers to pausing patterns during oral reading that reflect the punctuation and meaning of a text. See Sample Oral Reading Fluency Rubrics for prosody.

Clarification 5: Grade-level texts, for the purposes of fluency, are those within the grade band on quantitative text complexity measures and appropriate in content and qualitative measures.

ELA.2.R.1.1: Identify plot structure and describe main story elements in a literary text.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Main story elements for the purpose of this benchmark are the setting, characters, and sequence of events of a story. 
Clarification 2: For setting, students will describe where and when the events of the story are happening. The time element of setting will be addressed even when not explicitly indicated in the text. 
Clarification 3: For character, student’s will describe characters’ traits, feelings, and behaviors.
ELA.2.R.1.2: Identify and explain a theme of a literary text.
ELA.2.R.1.3: Identify different characters’ perspectives in a literary text.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: The term perspective means “a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something.” The term point of view is used when referring to the person of the narrator. This is to prevent confusion and conflation.
ELA.2.R.1.4: Identify rhyme schemes in poems.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Students will mark rhyme scheme and recognize rhyme scheme notation. Rhyme scheme notation uses capital letters, starting with A to mark the end of each line, repeating the letter for each line in the poem that rhymes with that line and progressing through the alphabet for each new end rhyme. Lines designated with the same letter all rhyme with each other.

Examples:

I never saw a Purple Cow,  A
I never hope to see one;    B
But I can tell you, anyhow, A
I'd rather see than be one!  B

                                             –Gelett Burgess


Little Miss Muffet                         A
Sat on a tuffet,                           A
Eating her curds and whey;          B
Along came a spider                    C
Who sat down beside her             C
And frightened Miss Muffet away.  B

                                             –Traditional Nursery Rhyme

ELA.2.R.2.1: Explain how text features—including titles, headings, captions, graphs, maps, glossaries, and/or illustrations—contribute to the meaning of texts.
ELA.2.R.2.2: Identify the central idea and relevant details in a text.
ELA.2.R.2.3: Explain an author’s purpose in an informational text.
ELA.2.R.2.4: Explain an author’s opinion(s) and supporting evidence.
ELA.2.R.3.1: Identify and explain similes, idioms, and alliteration in text(s).
ELA.2.R.3.2: Retell a text to enhance comprehension. 
  1. Use main story elements in a logical sequence for a literary text.
  2. Use the central idea and relevant details for an informational text. 
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Most grade-level texts are appropriate for this benchmark.
    ELA.2.R.3.3: Compare and contrast important details presented by two texts on the same topic or theme.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: For literary texts, students can compare and contrast story elements such as characters, illustrations, and sequence of events. 

    Clarification 2: The different versions may be of the same or different formats. 

    ELA.2.V.1.1: Use grade-level academic vocabulary appropriately in speaking and writing.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Grade-level academic vocabulary consists of words that are likely to appear across subject areas for the current grade level and beyond, vital to comprehension, critical for academic discussions and writing, and usually require explicit instruction.
    ELA.2.V.1.2: Identify and use base words and affixes to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in grade-level content.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: See Base Words.
    ELA.2.V.1.3: Identify and use context clues, word relationships, reference materials, and/or background knowledge to determine the meaning of unknown words.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Instruction for this benchmark should include text read-alouds and think-alouds aimed at building and activating background knowledge. Review of words learned in this way is critical to building background knowledge and related vocabulary. Texts read aloud can be two grade levels higher than student reading level.

    Clarification 2: See Context Clues and Word Relationships.

    ELA.K.F.1.1: Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of print.
    1. Locate a printed word on a page.
    2. Distinguish letters from words within sentences. 
    3. Match print to speech to demonstrate that language is represented by print. 
    4. Identify parts of a book (front cover, back cover, title page). 
    5. Move top to bottom and left to right on the printed page; returning to the beginning of the next line. 
    6. Identify all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet. 
    7. Recognize that print conveys specific meaning and pictures may support meaning.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Matching print to speech involves making a one-to-one correspondence between a spoken word and the print on the page. This can be accomplished by having the child point to each word in a sentence as it is read by an adult.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.F.1.2: Demonstrate phonological awareness.
    1. Blend and segment syllables in spoken words.
    2. Identify and produce alliterative and rhyming words. 
    3. Blend and segment onset and rimes of single-syllable words. 
    4. Identify the initial, medial, and final sound of spoken words. 
    5. Add or delete phonemes at the beginning or end of a spoken word and say the resulting word. 
    6. Segment and blend phonemes in single-syllable spoken words. 
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Phonological awareness only refers to what can be done orally at the syllable, onset-rime, and phoneme levels. It does not involve print or letter knowledge.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.F.1.3: Use knowledge of grade-appropriate phonics and word-analysis skills to decode words accurately.
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the most frequent sound for each consonant. 
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the short and long sounds for the five major vowels. 
    3. Decode consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words. 
    4. Encode consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Phonics refers to the relationship between graphemes (letters or letter combinations) and phonemes (speech sounds). 

    Clarification 2: Students will decode decodable high frequency words appropriate to the grade level. See K.F.1.4 and Dolch and Fry word lists. Students will read grade-level appropriate high frequency words, decodable or not, with automaticity.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.F.1.4: Recognize and read with automaticity grade-level high frequency words.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: See Dolch and Fry word lists. 

    Clarification 2: Many of the high frequency words at this grade level are either irregularly spelled and therefore not decodable or are temporarily irregular, meaning that students have not yet learned the phonics rule that would enable them to decode the word. Those words that are decodable should be introduced to students using appropriate phonics rules. See K.F.1.3. Students will read grade-level appropriate high frequency words, decodable or not, with automaticity.


    Examples:

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.R.1.1: Describe the main character(s), setting, and important events in a story.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: In describing the main character, students can describe appearance, actions, feelings, and thoughts of the character. Students will explain what in the text their description is based on. 
    Clarification 2: For setting, students will discuss where the events of the story are happening. The time element of setting should only be addressed in texts where it is explicitly indicated. 
    Clarification 3: Descriptions can be oral, either in response to a question or through discussion.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.R.1.3: Explain the roles of author and illustrator of a story.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Students will explain that the author writes the words and the illustrator creates the pictures, recognizing that sometimes one person does both jobs, as in Dr. Seuss’ Hop on Pop where Dr. Seuss performs both roles.

    Clarification 2: Students should also explain that both authors and illustrators contribute to the meaning of the text.

    ELA.K.R.1.4: Identify rhyme in a poem.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: This benchmark builds on the skills from the phonological awareness benchmark ELA.K.F.1.2(b): Identify and produce alliterative and rhyming words. The expectation is that students identify rhyming words in a poem that is read aloud. 

    Clarification 2: Students will also note where the rhyme is coming, e.g., at the end of a line.

    ELA.K.R.2.1: Use titles, headings, and illustrations to predict and confirm the topic of texts.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: The step of confirming the prediction is essential to mastery of this benchmark.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.R.2.2: Identify the topic of and multiple details in a text.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: The topic is the general subject of the text, a word or a short phrase describing what the text is about. For example, the main topic of the book Why Should I Recycle? is recycling.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.R.2.4: Explain the difference between opinions and facts about a topic.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Students will explain which statements are fact and which are opinion within a text. 

    Clarification 2: Students will orally explain that facts are things that a person knows about something and that can be proven true or false. Students will orally explain that opinions are what a person thinks about something, often related to feelings or beliefs. Opinions cannot be proven true or false. 

    Example: “Dogs need food and water to survive” is a fact. It can be proven to be true. “Dogs are the best pets” is an opinion. It’s what someone may think, but it can’t be proven.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.R.3.1: Identify and explain descriptive words in text(s).
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Students will explain examples of descriptive words in text and how they add meaning. 

    Clarification 2: Students will be introduced to the academic vocabulary word “adjective.” However, students are not expected to use the word independently. Discussion should focus on how the descriptive words add meaning to the text.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.R.3.2: Retell a text orally to enhance comprehension:
    1. Use main character(s), setting, and important events for a story.
    2. Use topic and details for an informational text.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Most grade-level texts are appropriate for this benchmark.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.R.3.3: Compare and contrast characters’ experiences in stories.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Students will orally compare and contrast the experiences that characters have had, comparing them to those experienced by other characters, in the same story or a different story. Those experiences can be expressed as events, feelings, or behaviors.
    ELA.K.V.1.1: Use grade-level academic vocabulary appropriately in speaking and writing.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Grade-level academic vocabulary consists of words that are likely to appear across subject areas for the current grade level and beyond, are vital to comprehension, critical for academic discussions and writing, and usually require explicit instruction.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.V.1.2: Ask and answer questions about unfamiliar words in grade-level content.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K.V.1.3: Identify and sort common words into basic categories, relating vocabulary to background knowledge.
    Clarifications:
    Clarification 1: Instruction for this benchmark should include text read-alouds and think-alouds aimed at building and activating background knowledge. Review of words learned in this way is critical to building background knowledge and related vocabulary. Texts read aloud can be two grade levels higher than student reading level. 

    Clarification 2: See Context Clues and Word Relationships.

    Standard Relation to Course: Major

    ELA.K12.EE.1.1: Cite evidence to explain and justify reasoning.
    Clarifications:
    K-1 Students include textual evidence in their oral communication with guidance and support from adults. The evidence can consist of details from the text without naming the text. During 1st grade, students learn how to incorporate the evidence in their writing.

    2-3 Students include relevant textual evidence in their written and oral communication. Students should name the text when they refer to it. In 3rd grade, students should use a combination of direct and indirect citations.

    4-5 Students continue with previous skills and reference comments made by speakers and peers. Students cite texts that they’ve directly quoted, paraphrased, or used for information. When writing, students will use the form of citation dictated by the instructor or the style guide referenced by the instructor. 

    6-8 Students continue with previous skills and use a style guide to create a proper citation.

    9-12 Students continue with previous skills and should be aware of existing style guides and the ways in which they differ.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

    ELA.K12.EE.2.1: Read and comprehend grade-level complex texts proficiently.
    Clarifications:
    See Text Complexity for grade-level complexity bands and a text complexity rubric.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

    ELA.K12.EE.3.1: Make inferences to support comprehension.
    Clarifications:
    Students will make inferences before the words infer or inference are introduced. Kindergarten students will answer questions like “Why is the girl smiling?” or make predictions about what will happen based on the title page. Students will use the terms and apply them in 2nd grade and beyond.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

    ELA.K12.EE.4.1: Use appropriate collaborative techniques and active listening skills when engaging in discussions in a variety of situations.
    Clarifications:
    In kindergarten, students learn to listen to one another respectfully.

    In grades 1-2, students build upon these skills by justifying what they are thinking. For example: “I think ________ because _______.” The collaborative conversations are becoming academic conversations.

    In grades 3-12, students engage in academic conversations discussing claims and justifying their reasoning, refining and applying skills. Students build on ideas, propel the conversation, and support claims and counterclaims with evidence.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

    ELA.K12.EE.5.1: Use the accepted rules governing a specific format to create quality work.
    Clarifications:
    Students will incorporate skills learned into work products to produce quality work. For students to incorporate these skills appropriately, they must receive instruction. A 3rd grade student creating a poster board display must have instruction in how to effectively present information to do quality work.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

    ELA.K12.EE.6.1: Use appropriate voice and tone when speaking or writing.
    Clarifications:
    In kindergarten and 1st grade, students learn the difference between formal and informal language. For example, the way we talk to our friends differs from the way we speak to adults. In 2nd grade and beyond, students practice appropriate social and academic language to discuss texts.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

    ELD.K12.ELL.LA.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

    ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.

    Standard Relation to Course: Supporting




    General Course Information and Notes

    VERSION DESCRIPTION

    This course supports students who are struggling to read and write or speak about what they have read in core instruction. Instruction will use explicit, systematic, and sequential approaches to reading instruction addressing all components of reading including phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and reading comprehension. 

    Teachers will use the listed standards that correspond to student need based on diagnostic assessments and adjust according to ongoing progress monitoring data. 

    Effective instruction matches instruction to the need of the students in the group and provides multiple opportunities to practice the skill and receive feedback. The additional time allotted is in addition to core instruction. The intervention includes materials and strategies designed to supplement core instruction.


    GENERAL NOTES

     

    English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
    Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/la.pdf


    VERSION REQUIREMENTS

    Interventions must be evidence-based and correspond to either the district K-12 Evidence-based Comprehensive Reading plan or the reading plan within a school's charter.


    QUALIFICATIONS

    As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

    Any field when certification reflects a bachelor or higher degree plus Reading Endorsement.

     

    THE READING ENDORSEMENT IS A REQUIREMENT FOR TEACHERS PROVIDING TIER 3 INSTRUCTION.


    General Information

    Course Number: 5010020 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades PreK to 5 Education Courses > Subject: English/Language Arts > SubSubject: General >
    Abbreviated Title: BAS SKLS READ K-2
    Course Attributes:
    • Florida Standards Course
    Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 2
    Course Status: Course Approved
    Grade Level(s): K,1,2



    Educator Certifications

    Reading (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
    Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
    Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
    English (Elementary Grades 1-6)
    Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
    Primary Education (K-3)


    State Adopted Instructional Materials

    Lexia Core5 Reading - Basic Skills in Reading K-2 Edition
    Lexia Learning Systems LLC - Lexia Learning Systems - v4.2 - 2020
    Thumbnail

    There are more than 6 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/17769