Humane Letters 2 History Honors (#2109343) 


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Course Standards


Name Description
SS.912.A.1.1: Describe the importance of historiography, which includes how historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted, when interpreting events in history.
SS.912.A.1.2: Utilize a variety of primary and secondary sources to identify author, historical significance, audience, and authenticity to understand a historical period.
Clarifications:
Examples of primary and secondary sources may be found on various websites such as the site for The Kinsey Collection.
SS.912.A.1.3: Utilize timelines to identify the time sequence of historical data.
SS.912.A.1.4: Analyze how images, symbols, objects, cartoons, graphs, charts, maps, and artwork may be used to interpret the significance of time periods and events from the past.
SS.912.A.1.6: Use case studies to explore social, political, legal, and economic relationships in history.
SS.912.A.3.2: Examine the social, political, and economic causes, course, and consequences of the second Industrial Revolution that began in the late 19th century.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.3.10: Review different economic and philosophic ideologies.
Clarifications:
Economic examples may include, but are not limited to, market economy, mixed economy, planned economy and philosophic examples are capitalism, socialism, communism, anarchy.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.H.1.2: Describe how historical events, social context, and culture impact forms, techniques, and purposes of works in the arts, including the relationship between a government and its citizens.
Clarifications:
Examples are imperial Roman sculpture; Palace of Versailles; Picasso's Guernica; layout of Washington, DC.
SS.912.H.1.4: Explain philosophical beliefs as they relate to works in the arts.
Clarifications:
Examples are classical architecture, protest music, Native American dance, Japanese Noh.
SS.912.H.1.7: Know terminology of art forms (narthex, apse, triforium of Gothic cathedral) within cultures and use appropriately in oral and written references.
SS.912.H.2.1: Identify specific characteristics of works within various art forms (architecture, dance, film, literature, music, theatre, and visual arts).
SS.912.H.2.3: Apply various types of critical analysis (contextual, formal, and intuitive criticism) to works in the arts, including the types and use of symbolism within art forms and their philosophical implications.
SS.912.H.2.4: Examine the effects that works in the arts have on groups, individuals, and cultures.
SS.912.H.3.1: Analyze the effects of transportation, trade, communication, science, and technology on the preservation and diffusion of culture.
SS.912.P.8.2: Discuss the relationship between language and thought.
SS.912.P.10.2: Identify how cultures change over time and vary within nations and internationally.
SS.912.P.10.3: Discuss the relationship between culture and conceptions of self and identity.
SS.912.S.2.1: Define the key components of a culture, such as knowledge, language and communication, customs, values, norms, and physical objects.
SS.912.S.2.9: Prepare original written and oral reports and presentations on specific events, people or historical eras.
SS.912.S.3.3: Examine and analyze various points of view relating to historical and current events.
SS.912.S.5.1: Identify basic social institutions and explain their impact on individuals, groups and organizations within society and how they transmit the values of society.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, familial, religious, educational, economic, and political institutions.
SS.912.S.5.6: Identify the factors that influence change in social norms over time.
SS.912.S.6.1: Describe how and why societies change over time.
SS.912.S.6.8: Investigate the consequences in society as result of changes.
SS.912.W.1.1: Use timelines to establish cause and effect relationships of historical events.
SS.912.W.1.2: Compare time measurement systems used by different cultures.
Clarifications:
Examples are Chinese, Gregorian, and Islamic calendars, dynastic periods, decade, century, era.
SS.912.W.1.3: Interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources.
Clarifications:
Examples are artifacts, images, auditory and written sources.
SS.912.W.1.4: Explain how historians use historical inquiry and other sciences to understand the past.
Clarifications:
Examples are archaeology, economics, geography, forensic chemistry, political science, physics.
SS.912.W.1.5: Compare conflicting interpretations or schools of thought about world events and individual contributions to history (historiography).
SS.912.W.1.6: Evaluate the role of history in shaping identity and character.
Clarifications:
Examples are ethnic, cultural, personal, national, religious.
SS.912.W.2.3: Analyze the extent to which the Byzantine Empire was a continuation of the old Roman Empire and in what ways it was a departure.
SS.912.W.2.5: Explain the contributions of the Byzantine Empire.
Clarifications:
Examples are Justinian's Code, the preservation of ancient Greek and Roman learning and culture, artistic and architectural achievements, the empire's impact on the development of Western Europe, Islamic civilization, and Slavic peoples.
SS.912.W.2.6: Describe the causes and effects of the Iconoclast controversy of the 8th and 9th centuries and the 11th century Christian schism between the churches of Constantinople and Rome.
SS.912.W.2.7: Analyze causes (Justinian's Plague, ongoing attacks from the "barbarians," the Crusades, and internal political turmoil) of the decline of the Byzantine Empire.
SS.912.W.2.10: Describe the orders of medieval social hierarchy, the changing role of the Church, the emergence of feudalism, and the development of private property as a distinguishing feature of Western Civilization.
SS.912.W.2.11: Describe the rise and achievements of significant rulers in medieval Europe.
Clarifications:
Examples are Charles Martel, Charlemagne, Otto the Great, William the Conqueror.
SS.912.W.2.12: Recognize the importance of Christian monasteries and convents as centers of education, charitable and missionary activity, economic productivity, and political power.
SS.912.W.2.13: Explain how Western civilization arose from a synthesis of classical Greco-Roman civilization, Judeo-Christian influence, and the cultures of northern European peoples promoting a cultural unity in Europe.
SS.912.W.2.14: Describe the causes and effects of the Great Famine of 1315-1316, The Black Death, The Great Schism of 1378, and the Hundred Years War on Western Europe.
SS.912.W.2.15: Determine the factors that contributed to the growth of a modern economy.
Clarifications:
Examples are growth of banking, technological and agricultural improvements, commerce, towns, guilds, rise of a merchant class.
SS.912.W.2.16: Trace the growth and development of a national identity in the countries of England, France, and Spain.
SS.912.W.2.17: Identify key figures, artistic, and intellectual achievements of the medieval period in Western Europe.
Clarifications:
Examples are Anselm of Canterbury, Chaucer, Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, Hildegard of Bingen, Dante, Code of Chivalry, Gothic architecture, illumination, universities, Natural Law Philosophy, Scholasticism.
SS.912.W.2.18: Describe developments in medieval English legal and constitutional history and their importance to the rise of modern democratic institutions and procedures.
Clarifications:
Examples are Magna Carta, parliament, habeas corpus.
SS.912.W.3.2: Compare the major beliefs and principles of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
SS.912.W.3.7: Analyze the causes, key events, and effects of the European response to Islamic expansion beginning in the 7th century.
Clarifications:
Examples are Crusades, Reconquista.
SS.912.W.3.8: Identify important figures associated with the Crusades.
Clarifications:
Examples are Alexius Comnenus, Pope Urban, Bernard of Clairvaux, Godfrey of Bouillon, Saladin, Richard the Lionheart, Baybars, Louis IX.
SS.912.W.4.1: Identify the economic and political causes for the rise of the Italian city-states (Florence, Milan, Naples, Rome, Venice).
SS.912.W.4.2: Recognize major influences on the architectural, artistic, and literary developments of Renaissance Italy (Classical, Byzantine, Islamic, Western European).
SS.912.W.4.3: Identify the major artistic, literary, and technological contributions of individuals during the Renaissance.
Clarifications:
Examples are Petrarch, Brunelleschi, Giotto, the Medici Family, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Erasmus, Thomas More, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Gutenberg, El Greco, Artemisia Gentileschi, Van Eyck.
SS.912.W.4.4: Identify characteristics of Renaissance humanism in works of art.
Clarifications:
Examples are influence of classics, School of Athens.
SS.912.W.4.5: Describe how ideas from the Middle Ages and Renaissance led to the Scientific Revolution.
SS.912.W.4.6: Describe how scientific theories and methods of the Scientific Revolution challenged those of the early classical and medieval periods.
SS.912.W.4.7: Identify criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church by individuals such as Wycliffe, Hus and Erasmus and their impact on later reformers.
SS.912.W.4.8: Summarize religious reforms associated with Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Henry VIII, and John of Leyden and the effects of the Reformation on Europe.
Clarifications:
Examples are Catholic and Counter Reformation, political and religious fragmentation, military conflict, expansion of capitalism.
SS.912.W.4.9: Analyze the Roman Catholic Church's response to the Protestant Reformation in the forms of the Counter and Catholic Reformation.
Clarifications:
Examples are Council of Trent, Thomas More, Ignatius of Loyola and the Jesuits, Teresa of Avila, Charles V.
SS.912.W.4.10: Identify the major contributions of individuals associated with the Scientific Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples are Francis Bacon, Nicholas Copernicus, Rene Descartes, Galileo Galilei, Johannes Kepler, Isaac Newton, Blaise Pascal, Vesalius.
SS.912.W.4.11: Summarize the causes that led to the Age of Exploration, and identify major voyages and sponsors.
SS.912.W.4.12: Evaluate the scope and impact of the Columbian Exchange on Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas.
SS.912.W.4.13: Examine the various economic and political systems of Portugal, Spain, the Netherlands, France, and England in the Americas.
SS.912.W.4.14: Recognize the practice of slavery and other forms of forced labor experienced during the 13th through 17th centuries in East Africa, West Africa, Europe, Southwest Asia, and the Americas.
SS.912.W.5.1: Compare the causes and effects of the development of constitutional monarchy in England with those of the development of absolute monarchy in France, Spain, and Russia.
SS.912.W.5.2: Identify major causes of the Enlightenment.
Clarifications:
Examples are ideas from the Renaissance, Scientific Revolution, Reformation, and resistance to absolutism.
SS.912.W.5.3: Summarize the major ideas of Enlightenment philosophers.
SS.912.W.5.4: Evaluate the impact of Enlightenment ideals on the development of economic, political, and religious structures in the Western world.
SS.912.W.5.5: Analyze the extent to which the Enlightenment impacted the American and French Revolutions.
SS.912.W.5.6: Summarize the important causes, events, and effects of the French Revolution including the rise and rule of Napoleon.
SS.912.W.6.1: Describe the agricultural and technological innovations that led to industrialization in Great Britain and its subsequent spread to continental Europe, the United States, and Japan.
SS.912.W.6.2: Summarize the social and economic effects of the Industrial Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples are urbanization, increased productivity and wealth, rise of the middle class, conditions faced by workers, rise of labor unions, expansion of colonialism.
SS.912.W.6.3: Compare the philosophies of capitalism, socialism, and communism as described by Adam Smith, Robert Owen, and Karl Marx.
SS.912.W.6.4: Describe the 19th and early 20th century social and political reforms and reform movements and their effects in Africa, Asia, Europe, the United States, the Caribbean, and Latin America.
Clarifications:
Examples are Meiji Reforms, abolition of slavery in the British Empire, expansion of women's rights, labor laws.
SS.912.W.6.5: Summarize the causes, key events, and effects of the unification of Italy and Germany.
SS.912.W.6.6: Analyze the causes and effects of imperialism.
Clarifications:
Examples are social impact on indigenous peoples, the Crimean War, development of the Suez Canal, Spheres of Influence)
SS.912.W.7.1: Analyze the causes of World War I including the formation of European alliances and the roles of imperialism, nationalism, and militarism.
SS.912.W.7.4: Describe the causes and effects of the German economic crisis of the 1920s and the global depression of the 1930s, and analyze how governments responded to the Great Depression.
SS.912.W.7.5: Describe the rise of authoritarian governments in the Soviet Union, Italy, Germany, and Spain, and analyze the policies and main ideas of Vladimir Lenin, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler, and Francisco Franco.
SS.912.W.7.6: Analyze the restriction of individual rights and the use of mass terror against populations in the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, and occupied territories.
SS.912.W.7.7: Trace the causes and key events related to World War II.
SS.912.W.8.1: Identify the United States and Soviet aligned states of Europe, and contrast their political and economic characteristics.
SS.912.W.8.2: Describe characteristics of the early Cold War.
Clarifications:
Examples are containment policy, Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, NATO, Iron Curtain, Berlin Airlift, Warsaw Pact.
SS.912.W.8.5: Identify the factors that led to the decline and fall of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.
Clarifications:
Examples are the arms race, Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, growing internal resistance to communism, perestroika and glasnost, United States influence.
SS.912.W.9.1: Identify major scientific figures and breakthroughs of the 20th century, and assess their impact on contemporary life.
Clarifications:
Examples are Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, Sigmund Freud, Wright Brothers, Charles R. Drew, mass vaccination, atomic energy, transistor, microchip, space exploration, Internet, discovery of DNA, Human Genome Project.
SS.912.W.9.2: Describe the causes and effects of post-World War II economic and demographic changes.
Clarifications:
Examples are medical and technological advances, free market economics, increased consumption of natural resources and goods, rise in expectations for standards of living.
SS.912.W.9.4: Describe the causes and effects of twentieth century nationalist conflicts.
Clarifications:
Examples are Cyprus, Kashmir, Tibet, Northern Ireland.
MA.K12.MTR.1.1: Actively participate in effortful learning both individually and collectively.  

Mathematicians who participate in effortful learning both individually and with others: 

  • Analyze the problem in a way that makes sense given the task. 
  • Ask questions that will help with solving the task. 
  • Build perseverance by modifying methods as needed while solving a challenging task. 
  • Stay engaged and maintain a positive mindset when working to solve tasks. 
  • Help and support each other when attempting a new method or approach.

 

Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to participate actively in effortful learning both individually and with others:
  • Cultivate a community of growth mindset learners. 
  • Foster perseverance in students by choosing tasks that are challenging. 
  • Develop students’ ability to analyze and problem solve. 
  • Recognize students’ effort when solving challenging problems.
MA.K12.MTR.2.1: Demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways.  

Mathematicians who demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways:  

  • Build understanding through modeling and using manipulatives.
  • Represent solutions to problems in multiple ways using objects, drawings, tables, graphs and equations.
  • Progress from modeling problems with objects and drawings to using algorithms and equations.
  • Express connections between concepts and representations.
  • Choose a representation based on the given context or purpose.
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways: 
  • Help students make connections between concepts and representations.
  • Provide opportunities for students to use manipulatives when investigating concepts.
  • Guide students from concrete to pictorial to abstract representations as understanding progresses.
  • Show students that various representations can have different purposes and can be useful in different situations. 
MA.K12.MTR.3.1: Complete tasks with mathematical fluency. 

Mathematicians who complete tasks with mathematical fluency:

  • Select efficient and appropriate methods for solving problems within the given context.
  • Maintain flexibility and accuracy while performing procedures and mental calculations.
  • Complete tasks accurately and with confidence.
  • Adapt procedures to apply them to a new context.
  • Use feedback to improve efficiency when performing calculations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to complete tasks with mathematical fluency:
  • Provide students with the flexibility to solve problems by selecting a procedure that allows them to solve efficiently and accurately.
  • Offer multiple opportunities for students to practice efficient and generalizable methods.
  • Provide opportunities for students to reflect on the method they used and determine if a more efficient method could have been used. 
MA.K12.MTR.4.1: Engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others. 

Mathematicians who engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:

  • Communicate mathematical ideas, vocabulary and methods effectively.
  • Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.
  • Compare the efficiency of a method to those expressed by others.
  • Recognize errors and suggest how to correctly solve the task.
  • Justify results by explaining methods and processes.
  • Construct possible arguments based on evidence. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:
  • Establish a culture in which students ask questions of the teacher and their peers, and error is an opportunity for learning.
  • Create opportunities for students to discuss their thinking with peers.
  • Select, sequence and present student work to advance and deepen understanding of correct and increasingly efficient methods.
  • Develop students’ ability to justify methods and compare their responses to the responses of their peers. 
MA.K12.MTR.5.1: Use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts. 

Mathematicians who use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:

  • Focus on relevant details within a problem.
  • Create plans and procedures to logically order events, steps or ideas to solve problems.
  • Decompose a complex problem into manageable parts.
  • Relate previously learned concepts to new concepts.
  • Look for similarities among problems.
  • Connect solutions of problems to more complicated large-scale situations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:
  • Help students recognize the patterns in the world around them and connect these patterns to mathematical concepts.
  • Support students to develop generalizations based on the similarities found among problems.
  • Provide opportunities for students to create plans and procedures to solve problems.
  • Develop students’ ability to construct relationships between their current understanding and more sophisticated ways of thinking.
MA.K12.MTR.6.1: Assess the reasonableness of solutions. 

Mathematicians who assess the reasonableness of solutions: 

  • Estimate to discover possible solutions.
  • Use benchmark quantities to determine if a solution makes sense.
  • Check calculations when solving problems.
  • Verify possible solutions by explaining the methods used.
  • Evaluate results based on the given context. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to assess the reasonableness of solutions:
  • Have students estimate or predict solutions prior to solving.
  • Prompt students to continually ask, “Does this solution make sense? How do you know?”
  • Reinforce that students check their work as they progress within and after a task.
  • Strengthen students’ ability to verify solutions through justifications. 
MA.K12.MTR.7.1: Apply mathematics to real-world contexts. 

Mathematicians who apply mathematics to real-world contexts:

  • Connect mathematical concepts to everyday experiences.
  • Use models and methods to understand, represent and solve problems.
  • Perform investigations to gather data or determine if a method is appropriate. • Redesign models and methods to improve accuracy or efficiency. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to apply mathematics to real-world contexts:
  • Provide opportunities for students to create models, both concrete and abstract, and perform investigations.
  • Challenge students to question the accuracy of their models and methods.
  • Support students as they validate conclusions by comparing them to the given situation.
  • Indicate how various concepts can be applied to other disciplines.
ELA.K12.EE.1.1: Cite evidence to explain and justify reasoning.
Clarifications:
K-1 Students include textual evidence in their oral communication with guidance and support from adults. The evidence can consist of details from the text without naming the text. During 1st grade, students learn how to incorporate the evidence in their writing.

2-3 Students include relevant textual evidence in their written and oral communication. Students should name the text when they refer to it. In 3rd grade, students should use a combination of direct and indirect citations.

4-5 Students continue with previous skills and reference comments made by speakers and peers. Students cite texts that they’ve directly quoted, paraphrased, or used for information. When writing, students will use the form of citation dictated by the instructor or the style guide referenced by the instructor. 

6-8 Students continue with previous skills and use a style guide to create a proper citation.

9-12 Students continue with previous skills and should be aware of existing style guides and the ways in which they differ.

ELA.K12.EE.2.1: Read and comprehend grade-level complex texts proficiently.
Clarifications:
See Text Complexity for grade-level complexity bands and a text complexity rubric.
ELA.K12.EE.3.1: Make inferences to support comprehension.
Clarifications:
Students will make inferences before the words infer or inference are introduced. Kindergarten students will answer questions like “Why is the girl smiling?” or make predictions about what will happen based on the title page. Students will use the terms and apply them in 2nd grade and beyond.
ELA.K12.EE.4.1: Use appropriate collaborative techniques and active listening skills when engaging in discussions in a variety of situations.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten, students learn to listen to one another respectfully.

In grades 1-2, students build upon these skills by justifying what they are thinking. For example: “I think ________ because _______.” The collaborative conversations are becoming academic conversations.

In grades 3-12, students engage in academic conversations discussing claims and justifying their reasoning, refining and applying skills. Students build on ideas, propel the conversation, and support claims and counterclaims with evidence.

ELA.K12.EE.5.1: Use the accepted rules governing a specific format to create quality work.
Clarifications:
Students will incorporate skills learned into work products to produce quality work. For students to incorporate these skills appropriately, they must receive instruction. A 3rd grade student creating a poster board display must have instruction in how to effectively present information to do quality work.
ELA.K12.EE.6.1: Use appropriate voice and tone when speaking or writing.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten and 1st grade, students learn the difference between formal and informal language. For example, the way we talk to our friends differs from the way we speak to adults. In 2nd grade and beyond, students practice appropriate social and academic language to discuss texts.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.912.C.2.4: Evaluate how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.
Clarifications:
Seat-belt enforcement, underage alcohol sales, reporting communicable diseases, child care, and AED availability.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

Humane Letters 2 - History is an integrated blending of History and Literature that includes content standards categorized as American History, World History, and Humanities. Emphasizing the classical approach to teaching and learning, this social studies course fosters reading, discussion, and writing based on ideas contained within the great books of the modern European tradition. This course is designed to be paired with Humane Letters 2 - Literature.

Students study European history from the Late Middle Ages to the end of World War Two, with a special focus placed on political and societal change. Within the scope of this course, these changes are explored through the study of works of history, political philosophy, and imaginative literature. Political and societal changes include, but are not limited to, the historical development and theoretical justification of modern constitutional government. Additionally, students will explore questions concerning the basis of property rights, the birth and growth of modern ideologies in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the causes and effects of revolution. Recommended texts for this course include, but are not limited to: Locke’s Second Treatise of Government and Rousseau’s Discourse on Inequality.

Standards-based course content for each time period should include, but not be limited to:

Late Middle Ages: Understand how the Black Death, the Hundred Years’ War, and tensions within the Medieval Church led to ruptures in medieval society that paved the way for the Renaissance.

The Renaissance: Determine how the Renaissance period opened the door for humanistic thinking, more nationalized monarchies, and open calls for social/political reform. Special emphasis may be placed the writings of Machiavelli, Castiglione and Mirandola.

The Reformation: Recognize the central tenets of the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, noting especially the diverse beliefs among Protestant groups and the social/political impact of the movement.

The Age of Religious Wars: Examine the violent nature of confessional wars across Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries, noting especially the gradual shift toward considerations of domestic and international society adopted by the politiques.

European State Consolidation (English Constitutionalism and French Absolutism): Analyze the means by which England and France consolidated political power in the hands of the state, noting especially the political theory behind Constitutionalism and Absolutism. Examine the intricacies of the English Civil War, the legacy of Oliver Cromwell, the significance of the Glorious Revolution, and counterexample of Louis XIV’s absolutism.

Scientific Revolution: Discuss the ideas associated with major thinkers of the 16th and 17th centuries who emphasized empiricism and a new philosophy of science. Explain why this new epistemology was “revolutionary” and was poised to supplant more traditional means of knowing.

18th–Century Thought and Life: Recognize the most salient aspects of the Old Regime, noting the social, political, economic, and intellectual tensions that existed therein that paved the way towards the French Revolution. Careful attention is given to the Enlightenment, including its major thinkers and their calls for reform of religion, politics and society.

The French Revolution and the Modern Nation-State: Discuss the political, intellectual, industrial, and societal themes that lead to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Recognize the common themes in the definition and formation of modern European nation-states.

19th-Centuray Thought, Politics, and Culture: Investigate the many new threads which are woven together to create the aspirations, ambitions, and tensions which set the stage for the World Wars.

The World Wars: Recognize historical facts about WWI and WWII.  Analyze the origins of these wars.  Discuss the relationship between the end of WWI and the beginning of WWII.  Examine how WWII created the early conditions of the Cold War and modernity more generally.


GENERAL NOTES

Instructional Practices

The recommended primary mode of instruction in Humane Letters is the seminar, supplemented with direct instruction through lecture or coaching. The seminar format requires that students participate actively in their search for the fullest understanding of the texts under examination. While the instructor serves as a guide in the learning process, the students and the instructor together investigate and explore the many complex ideas presented in the texts. Students are expected to follow these rules governing the seminar format:

  • Students must come to class having read the assignment in its entirety before they can participate in seminar discussion
  • Students must mentally prepare serious questions for the class to consider during discussion.
  • Each student must attend fully to the discussion at hand and refrain from carrying on side discussions.
  • Students must limit their comments only to the selection assigned for homework, or previously discussed passages.
  • Students must support their observations, arguments, or claims with specific textual evidence.

VERSION REQUIREMENTS

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Literacy Standards in Social Studies
Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: {{AzureStorageLink}}/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 2109343 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Social Studies > SubSubject: World and Eastern Hemispheric Histories >
Abbreviated Title: HUM LET 2 HIST HON
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
  • Class Size Core Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Core Academic Course Course Level: 3
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12
Graduation Requirement: World History



Educator Certifications

Political Science (Grades 6-12)
History (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)


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