Sociology (#2108300) 


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org
You are not viewing the current course, please click the current year’s tab.

Course Standards

Name Description
SS.912.S.1.1: Discuss the development of the field of sociology as a social science.
SS.912.S.1.2: Identify early leading theorists within social science.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Auguste Comte, Emile Durkheim, Herbert Spencer, Max Weber, C. Wright Mills, and Karl Marx.
SS.912.S.1.3: Compare sociology with other social science disciplines.
SS.912.S.1.4: Examine changing points of view of social issues, such as poverty, crime and discrimination.
SS.912.S.1.5: Evaluate various types of sociologic research methods.
SS.912.S.1.6: Distinguish fact from opinion in data sources to analyze various points of view about a social issue.
SS.912.S.1.7: Determine cause-and-effect relationship issues among events as they relate to sociology.
SS.912.S.1.8: Identify, evaluate and use appropriate reference materials and technology to interpret information about cultural life in the United States and other world cultures, both in the past and today.
SS.912.S.1.9: Develop a working definition of sociology that has personal application.
SS.912.S.2.1: Define the key components of a culture, such as knowledge, language and communication, customs, values, norms, and physical objects.
SS.912.S.2.2: Explain the differences between a culture and a society.
SS.912.S.2.3: Recognize the influences of genetic inheritance and culture on human behavior.
SS.912.S.2.4: Give examples of subcultures and describe what makes them unique.
SS.912.S.2.5: Compare social norms among various subcultures.
SS.912.S.2.6: Identify the factors that promote cultural diversity within the United States.
SS.912.S.2.7: Explain how various practices of the culture create differences within group behavior.
SS.912.S.2.8: Compare and contrast different types of societies, such as hunting and gathering, agrarian, industrial, and post-industrial.
SS.912.S.2.9: Prepare original written and oral reports and presentations on specific events, people or historical eras.
SS.912.S.2.10: Identify both rights and responsibilities the individual has to the group.
SS.912.S.2.11: Demonstrate democratic approaches to managing disagreements and resolving conflicts within a culture.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, persuasion, compromise, debate, and negotiation.
SS.912.S.2.12: Compare and contrast ideas about citizenship and cultural participation from the past with those of the present community.
SS.912.S.3.1: Describe how social status affects social order.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, upper class, middle class, lower class, professional, blue collar, and unemployed.
SS.912.S.3.2: Explain how roles and role expectations can lead to role conflict.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, gender roles, age, racial and ethnic groups within different societies.
SS.912.S.3.3: Examine and analyze various points of view relating to historical and current events.
SS.912.S.4.1: Describe how individuals are affected by the different social groups to which they belong.
SS.912.S.4.2: Identify major characteristics of social groups familiar to the students.
SS.912.S.4.3: Examine the ways that groups function, such as roles, interactions and leadership.
SS.912.S.4.4: Discuss the social norms of at least two groups to which the student belongs.
SS.912.S.4.5: Analyze what can occur when the rules of behavior are broken and analyze the possible consequences for unacceptable behavior.
SS.912.S.4.6: Identify the various types of norms (folkways, mores, laws, and taboos) and explain why these rules of behavior are considered important to society.
SS.912.S.4.7: Discuss the concept of deviance and how society discourages deviant behavior using social control.
SS.912.S.4.8: Explain how students are members of primary and secondary groups and how those group memberships influence students’ behavior.
SS.912.S.4.9: Discuss how formal organizations influence behavior of their members.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, churches, synagogues, and mosques, political parties, and fraternal organizations.
SS.912.S.4.10: Distinguish the degree of assimilation that ethnic, cultural, and social groups achieve with the United States culture.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, forced vs. voluntary assimilations, association with different groups, interaction within a cultural community, adaptation within families due to education.
SS.912.S.4.11: Discuss how humans interact in a variety of social settings.
SS.912.S.4.12: Determine the cultural patterns of behavior within such social groups as rural/urban or rich/poor.
SS.912.S.4.13: Investigate and compare the ideas about citizenship and cultural participation of social groups from the past with those of the present community.
SS.912.S.5.1: Identify basic social institutions and explain their impact on individuals, groups and organizations within society and how they transmit the values of society.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, familial, religious, educational, economic, and political institutions.
SS.912.S.5.2: Discuss the concept of political power and factors that influence political power.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, social class, racial and ethnic group memberships, cultural group, gender, and age.
SS.912.S.5.3: Discuss how societies recognize rites of passage.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Baptism or other religious ceremonies, school prom, graduation, marriage, and retirement.
SS.912.S.5.4: Investigate stereotypes of the various United States subcultures, such as “American Indian,” “American cowboys,” teenagers,” “Americans,” “gangs,” and “hippies,” from a world perspective.
SS.912.S.5.5: Define ethnocentrism and explain how it can be beneficial or destructive to a culture.
SS.912.S.5.6: Identify the factors that influence change in social norms over time.
SS.912.S.5.7: Use various resources to interpret information about cultural life in the United States and other world cultures, both in the past and today.
SS.912.S.5.8: Analyze the primary and secondary groups common to different age groups in society.
SS.912.S.5.9: Conduct research and analysis on an issue associated with social structure or social institutions.
SS.912.S.5.10: Identify both rights and responsibilities the individual has to primary and secondary groups.
SS.912.S.5.11: Demonstrate democratic approaches to managing disagreements and solving conflicts within a social institution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, persuasion, compromise, debate, and negotiation.
SS.912.S.5.12: Explain how roles and role expectations can lead to role conflict.
SS.912.S.6.1: Describe how and why societies change over time.
SS.912.S.6.2: Examine various social influences that can lead to immediate and long-term changes.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, natural and man-made disasters, spatial movement of people, technology, urbanization, industrialization, immigration, war, challenge to authority, laws, diffusion of cultural traits, discrimination, discoveries and inventions, and scientific exploration.
SS.912.S.6.3: Describe how collective behavior can influence and change society.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, a rise in crime leading to community curfews, organized protests leading to governmental change in policy.
SS.912.S.6.4: Examine how technological innovations and scientific discoveries have influenced major social institutions.
SS.912.S.6.5: Discuss how social interactions and culture could be affected in the future due to innovations in science and technological change.
SS.912.S.6.6: Describe how the role of the mass media has changed over time and project what changes might occur in the future.
SS.912.S.6.7: Distinguish major differences between social movements and collective behavior with examples from history and the contemporary world.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the March on Washington (1963) vs. 1960s race riots.
SS.912.S.6.8: Investigate the consequences in society as result of changes.
SS.912.S.6.9: Trace the development of the use of a specific type of technology in the community.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, access to computers at school and home, and cellular phones.
SS.912.S.6.10: Propose a plan to improve a social structure, and design the means needed to implement the change.
SS.912.S.6.11: Cite examples of the use of technology in social research.
SS.912.S.6.12: Evaluate a current issue that has resulted from scientific discoveries and/or technological innovations.
SS.912.S.7.1: Identify characteristics of a “social” problem, as opposed to an “individual” problem.
SS.912.S.7.2: Describe how social problems have changed over time.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, juvenile delinquency, crime, poverty, and discrimination.
SS.912.S.7.3: Explain how patterns of behavior are found with certain social problems.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, juvenile offenses, such as gang membership, crime, sexual behavior, and teen pregnancy, are found in the histories of adult criminals.
SS.912.S.7.4: Discuss the implications of social problems for society.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, drug addiction, child abuse, school dropout rates, and unemployment.
SS.912.S.7.5: Examine how individual and group responses are often associated with social problems.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, “But everyone else is doing it” and “If I ignore it, it will go away.”
SS.912.S.7.6: Evaluate possible solutions to resolving social problems and the consequences that might result from those solutions.
SS.912.S.7.7: Survey local agencies involved in addressing social problems to determine the extent of the problems in the local community.
SS.912.S.7.8: Design and carry out school- and community-based projects to address a local aspect of a social problem.
SS.912.S.8.1: Describe traditions, roles, and expectations necessary for a community to continue.
SS.912.S.8.2: Describe how collective behavior (working in groups) can influence and change society. Use historical and contemporary examples to define collective behavior.
SS.912.S.8.3: Discuss theories that attempt to explain collective behavior.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, contagion theory and convergence theory.
SS.912.S.8.4: Define a social issue to be analyzed.
SS.912.S.8.5: Examine factors that could lead to the breakdown and disruption of an existing community.
SS.912.S.8.6: Discuss the impact of leaders of different social movements.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Gandhi, Hitler, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Susan B. Anthony.
SS.912.S.8.7: Define propaganda and discuss the methods of propaganda and discuss the methods of propaganda used to influence social behavior.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, news media and advertisements.
SS.912.S.8.8: Discuss both the benefits and social costs of collective behavior in society.
SS.912.S.8.9: Identify a community social problem and discuss appropriate actions to address the problem.
SS.912.S.8.10: Investigate how incorrect communications, such as rumors or gossip, can influence group behavior.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Orson Welles “The War of the Worlds” radio broadcast, and rumors in the mass media, on the internet, or in the community.
MA.K12.MTR.1.1: Actively participate in effortful learning both individually and collectively.  

Mathematicians who participate in effortful learning both individually and with others: 

  • Analyze the problem in a way that makes sense given the task. 
  • Ask questions that will help with solving the task. 
  • Build perseverance by modifying methods as needed while solving a challenging task. 
  • Stay engaged and maintain a positive mindset when working to solve tasks. 
  • Help and support each other when attempting a new method or approach.

 

Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to participate actively in effortful learning both individually and with others:
  • Cultivate a community of growth mindset learners. 
  • Foster perseverance in students by choosing tasks that are challenging. 
  • Develop students’ ability to analyze and problem solve. 
  • Recognize students’ effort when solving challenging problems.
MA.K12.MTR.2.1: Demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways.  

Mathematicians who demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways:  

  • Build understanding through modeling and using manipulatives.
  • Represent solutions to problems in multiple ways using objects, drawings, tables, graphs and equations.
  • Progress from modeling problems with objects and drawings to using algorithms and equations.
  • Express connections between concepts and representations.
  • Choose a representation based on the given context or purpose.
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways: 
  • Help students make connections between concepts and representations.
  • Provide opportunities for students to use manipulatives when investigating concepts.
  • Guide students from concrete to pictorial to abstract representations as understanding progresses.
  • Show students that various representations can have different purposes and can be useful in different situations. 
MA.K12.MTR.3.1: Complete tasks with mathematical fluency. 

Mathematicians who complete tasks with mathematical fluency:

  • Select efficient and appropriate methods for solving problems within the given context.
  • Maintain flexibility and accuracy while performing procedures and mental calculations.
  • Complete tasks accurately and with confidence.
  • Adapt procedures to apply them to a new context.
  • Use feedback to improve efficiency when performing calculations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to complete tasks with mathematical fluency:
  • Provide students with the flexibility to solve problems by selecting a procedure that allows them to solve efficiently and accurately.
  • Offer multiple opportunities for students to practice efficient and generalizable methods.
  • Provide opportunities for students to reflect on the method they used and determine if a more efficient method could have been used. 
MA.K12.MTR.4.1: Engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others. 

Mathematicians who engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:

  • Communicate mathematical ideas, vocabulary and methods effectively.
  • Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.
  • Compare the efficiency of a method to those expressed by others.
  • Recognize errors and suggest how to correctly solve the task.
  • Justify results by explaining methods and processes.
  • Construct possible arguments based on evidence. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:
  • Establish a culture in which students ask questions of the teacher and their peers, and error is an opportunity for learning.
  • Create opportunities for students to discuss their thinking with peers.
  • Select, sequence and present student work to advance and deepen understanding of correct and increasingly efficient methods.
  • Develop students’ ability to justify methods and compare their responses to the responses of their peers. 
MA.K12.MTR.5.1: Use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts. 

Mathematicians who use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:

  • Focus on relevant details within a problem.
  • Create plans and procedures to logically order events, steps or ideas to solve problems.
  • Decompose a complex problem into manageable parts.
  • Relate previously learned concepts to new concepts.
  • Look for similarities among problems.
  • Connect solutions of problems to more complicated large-scale situations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:
  • Help students recognize the patterns in the world around them and connect these patterns to mathematical concepts.
  • Support students to develop generalizations based on the similarities found among problems.
  • Provide opportunities for students to create plans and procedures to solve problems.
  • Develop students’ ability to construct relationships between their current understanding and more sophisticated ways of thinking.
MA.K12.MTR.6.1: Assess the reasonableness of solutions. 

Mathematicians who assess the reasonableness of solutions: 

  • Estimate to discover possible solutions.
  • Use benchmark quantities to determine if a solution makes sense.
  • Check calculations when solving problems.
  • Verify possible solutions by explaining the methods used.
  • Evaluate results based on the given context. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to assess the reasonableness of solutions:
  • Have students estimate or predict solutions prior to solving.
  • Prompt students to continually ask, “Does this solution make sense? How do you know?”
  • Reinforce that students check their work as they progress within and after a task.
  • Strengthen students’ ability to verify solutions through justifications. 
MA.K12.MTR.7.1: Apply mathematics to real-world contexts. 

Mathematicians who apply mathematics to real-world contexts:

  • Connect mathematical concepts to everyday experiences.
  • Use models and methods to understand, represent and solve problems.
  • Perform investigations to gather data or determine if a method is appropriate. • Redesign models and methods to improve accuracy or efficiency. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to apply mathematics to real-world contexts:
  • Provide opportunities for students to create models, both concrete and abstract, and perform investigations.
  • Challenge students to question the accuracy of their models and methods.
  • Support students as they validate conclusions by comparing them to the given situation.
  • Indicate how various concepts can be applied to other disciplines.
ELA.K12.EE.1.1: Cite evidence to explain and justify reasoning.
Clarifications:
K-1 Students include textual evidence in their oral communication with guidance and support from adults. The evidence can consist of details from the text without naming the text. During 1st grade, students learn how to incorporate the evidence in their writing.

2-3 Students include relevant textual evidence in their written and oral communication. Students should name the text when they refer to it. In 3rd grade, students should use a combination of direct and indirect citations.

4-5 Students continue with previous skills and reference comments made by speakers and peers. Students cite texts that they’ve directly quoted, paraphrased, or used for information. When writing, students will use the form of citation dictated by the instructor or the style guide referenced by the instructor. 

6-8 Students continue with previous skills and use a style guide to create a proper citation.

9-12 Students continue with previous skills and should be aware of existing style guides and the ways in which they differ.

ELA.K12.EE.2.1: Read and comprehend grade-level complex texts proficiently.
Clarifications:
See Text Complexity for grade-level complexity bands and a text complexity rubric.
ELA.K12.EE.3.1: Make inferences to support comprehension.
Clarifications:
Students will make inferences before the words infer or inference are introduced. Kindergarten students will answer questions like “Why is the girl smiling?” or make predictions about what will happen based on the title page. Students will use the terms and apply them in 2nd grade and beyond.
ELA.K12.EE.4.1: Use appropriate collaborative techniques and active listening skills when engaging in discussions in a variety of situations.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten, students learn to listen to one another respectfully.

In grades 1-2, students build upon these skills by justifying what they are thinking. For example: “I think ________ because _______.” The collaborative conversations are becoming academic conversations.

In grades 3-12, students engage in academic conversations discussing claims and justifying their reasoning, refining and applying skills. Students build on ideas, propel the conversation, and support claims and counterclaims with evidence.

ELA.K12.EE.5.1: Use the accepted rules governing a specific format to create quality work.
Clarifications:
Students will incorporate skills learned into work products to produce quality work. For students to incorporate these skills appropriately, they must receive instruction. A 3rd grade student creating a poster board display must have instruction in how to effectively present information to do quality work.
ELA.K12.EE.6.1: Use appropriate voice and tone when speaking or writing.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten and 1st grade, students learn the difference between formal and informal language. For example, the way we talk to our friends differs from the way we speak to adults. In 2nd grade and beyond, students practice appropriate social and academic language to discuss texts.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.912.C.2.4: Evaluate how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.
Clarifications:
Seat-belt enforcement, underage alcohol sales, reporting communicable diseases, child care, and AED availability.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Sociology - Through the study of sociology, students acquire an understanding of group interaction and its impact on individuals in order that they may have a greater awareness of the beliefs, values and behavior patterns of others. In an increasingly interdependent world, students need to recognize how group behavior affects both the individual and society.

Instructional Practices

Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

Florida’s Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking (B.E.S.T.) Standards
This course includes Florida’s B.E.S.T. ELA Expectations (EE) and Mathematical Thinking and Reasoning Standards (MTRs) for students. Florida educators should intentionally embed these standards within the content and their instruction as applicable. For guidance on the implementation of the EEs and MTRs, please visit https://www.cpalms.org/Standards/BEST_Standards.aspx and select the appropriate B.E.S.T. Standards package.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection is provided by the Florida Association of School Administrators: http://www.fasa.net/4DCGI/cms/review.html?Action=CMS_Document&DocID=139. Please be aware that these resources have not been reviewed by CPALMS and there may be a charge for the use of some of them in this collection.


General Information

Course Number: 2108300 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Social Studies > SubSubject: Sociology >
Abbreviated Title: SOCIOLOGY
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Attributes:
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: State Board Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12



Educator Certifications

Sociology (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)


There are more than 679 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/21249