M/J Civics (#2106010) 


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org
You are not viewing the current course, please click the current year’s tab.

Course Standards

Name Description
SS.7.C.1.1: Recognize how Enlightenment ideas including Montesquieu's view of separation of power and John Locke's theories related to natural law and how Locke's social contract influenced the Founding Fathers.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 18-19. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.1.2: Trace the impact that the Magna Carta, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, and Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" had on colonists' views of government.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 20-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.1.3: Describe how English policies and responses to colonial concerns led to the writing of the Declaration of Independence.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 22-23. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.7.C.1.4: Analyze the ideas (natural rights, role of the government) and complaints set forth in the Declaration of Independence.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 24-25. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.


 

SS.7.C.1.5: Identify how the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation led to the writing of the Constitution.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually eavluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.1.6: Interpret the intentions of the Preamble of the Constitution.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 27. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.1.7: Describe how the Constitution limits the powers of government through separation of powers and checks and balances.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 28-29. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.1.8: Explain the viewpoints of the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists regarding the ratification of the Constitution and inclusion of a bill of rights.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 30. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.1.9: Define the rule of law and recognize its influence on the development of the American legal, political, and governmental systems.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.1: Define the term "citizen," and identify legal means of becoming a United States citizen.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 32-33. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.2: Evaluate the obligations citizens have to obey laws, pay taxes, defend the nation, and serve on juries.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 34-35. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.3: Experience the responsibilities of citizens at the local, state, or federal levels.
Clarifications:
Examples are registering or pre-registering to vote, volunteering, communicating with government officials, informing others about current issues, participating in a political campaign/mock election.
SS.7.C.2.4: Evaluate rights contained in the Bill of Rights and other amendments to the Constitution.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 36-37. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.5: Distinguish how the Constitution safeguards and limits individual rights.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 38-39. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.6: Simulate the trial process and the role of juries in the administration of justice.
SS.7.C.2.7: Conduct a mock election to demonstrate the voting process and its impact on a school, community, or local level.
SS.7.C.2.8: Identify America's current political parties, and illustrate their ideas about government.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 40. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.9: Evaluate candidates for political office by analyzing their qualifications, experience, issue-based platforms, debates, and political ads.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 41-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.10: Examine the impact of media, individuals, and interest groups on monitoring and influencing government.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 43. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.11: Analyze media and political communications (bias, symbolism, propaganda).
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 44-45. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.12: Develop a plan to resolve a state or local problem by researching public policy alternatives, identifying appropriate government agencies to address the issue, and determining a course of action.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 46-47. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.13: Examine multiple perspectives on public and current issues.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 48-49. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.2.14: Conduct a service project to further the public good.
Clarifications:
The project can be at the school, community, state, national, or international level.
SS.7.C.3.1: Compare different forms of government (direct democracy, representative democracy, socialism, communism, monarchy, oligarchy, autocracy).
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 50. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.2: Compare parliamentary, federal, confederal, and unitary systems of government.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 51-52. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.7.C.3.3: Illustrate the structure and function (three branches of government established in Articles I, II, and III with corresponding powers) of government in the United States as established in the Constitution.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 53-54. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.4: Identify the relationship and division of powers between the federal government and state governments.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 55. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.5: Explain the Constitutional amendment process.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 56. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.6: Evaluate Constitutional rights and their impact on individuals and society.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 57. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.7: Analyze the impact of the 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th amendments on participation of minority groups in the American political process.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 58-59. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.8: Analyze the structure, functions, and processes of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 60-61. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.9: Illustrate the law making process at the local, state, and federal levels.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 60-61. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.10: Identify sources and types (civil, criminal, constitutional, military) of law.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 62. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.11: Diagram the levels, functions, and powers of courts at the state and federal levels.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 63-64. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.12: Analyze the significance and outcomes of landmark Supreme Court cases including, but not limited to, Marbury v. Madison, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Gideon v. Wainwright, Miranda v. Arizona, in re Gault, Tinker v. Des Moines, Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, United States v. Nixon, and Bush v. Gore.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 65. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.13: Compare the constitutions of the United States and Florida.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 66-67. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.14: Differentiate between local, state, and federal governments' obligations and services.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 68-69. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.4.1: Differentiate concepts related to United States domestic and foreign policy.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 70-71. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.4.2: Recognize government and citizen participation in international organizations.
Clarifications:
Examples are United Nations, NATO, Peace Corps, World Health Organization, World Trade Organization, International Court of Justice.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 72-73. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.7.C.4.3: Describe examples of how the United States has dealt with international conflicts.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 74-75. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.E.1.1: Explain how the principles of a market and mixed economy helped to develop the United States into a democratic nation.
SS.7.E.1.2: Discuss the importance of borrowing and lending in the United States, the government's role in controlling financial institutions, and list the advantages and disadvantages of using credit.
SS.7.E.1.3: Review the concepts of supply and demand, choice, scarcity, and opportunity cost as they relate to the development of the mixed market economy in the United States.
SS.7.E.1.4: Discuss the function of financial institutions in the development of a market economy.
SS.7.E.1.5: Assess how profits, incentives, and competition motivate individuals, households, and businesses in a free market economy.
SS.7.E.1.6: Compare the national budget process to the personal budget process.
Clarifications:
Prepare an individual budget which includes housing, food, leisure, communication, and miscellaneous categories and compare that to federal government budget allocations.
SS.7.E.2.1: Explain how federal, state, and local taxes support the economy as a function of the United States government.
SS.7.E.2.2: Describe the banking system in the United States and its impact on the money supply.
Clarifications:
Examples are the Federal Reserve System and privately owned banks.
SS.7.E.2.3: Identify and describe United States laws and regulations adopted to promote economic competition.
SS.7.E.2.4: Identify entrepreneurs from various gender, social, and ethnic backgrounds who started a business seeking to make a profit.
SS.7.E.2.5: Explain how economic institutions impact the national economy.
Clarifications:
Examples are the stock market, banks, credit unions.
SS.7.E.3.1: Explain how international trade requires a system for exchanging currency between and among nations.
SS.7.E.3.2: Assess how the changing value of currency affects trade of goods and services between nations.
SS.7.E.3.3: Compare and contrast a single resource economy with a diversified economy.
SS.7.E.3.4: Compare and contrast the standard of living in various countries today to that of the United States using gross domestic product (GDP) per capita as an indicator.
SS.7.G.1.1: Locate the fifty states and their capital cities in addition to the nation's capital on a map.
SS.7.G.1.2: Locate on a world map the territories and protectorates of the United States of America.
Clarifications:
Examples are American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands.
SS.7.G.1.3: Interpret maps to identify geopolitical divisions and boundaries of places in North America.
SS.7.G.2.1: Locate major cultural landmarks that are emblematic of the United States.
Clarifications:
Examples are Statue of Liberty, White House, Mount Rushmore, Capitol, Empire State Building, Gateway Arch, Independence Hall, Alamo, Hoover Dam.
SS.7.G.2.2: Locate major physical landmarks that are emblematic of the United States.
Clarifications:
Examples are Grand Canyon, Mt. Denali, Everglades, Great Salt Lake, Mississippi River, Great Plains.
SS.7.G.2.3: Explain how major physical characteristics, natural resources, climate, and absolute and relative location have influenced settlement, economies, and inter-governmental relations in North America.
SS.7.G.2.4: Describe current major cultural regions of North America.
Clarifications:
Examples are the South, Rust-belt, Silicon Valley.
SS.7.G.3.1: Use maps to describe the location, abundance, and variety of natural resources in North America.
SS.7.G.4.1: Use geographic terms and tools to explain cultural diffusion throughout North America.
SS.7.G.4.2: Use maps and other geographic tools to examine the importance of demographics within political divisions of the United States.
SS.7.G.5.1: Use a choropleth or other map to geographically represent current information about issues of conservation or ecology in the local community.
Clarifications:
Examples are tri-county mangrove decimation, beach erosion.
SS.7.G.6.1: Use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or other technology to view maps of current information about the United States.
Clarifications:
Examples are population density, changes in census data, and district reapportionment over time.
LAFS.68.RH.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
LAFS.68.RH.1.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
LAFS.68.RH.1.3: Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
LAFS.68.RH.2.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
LAFS.68.RH.2.5: Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally).
LAFS.68.RH.2.6: Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
LAFS.68.RH.3.7: Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
LAFS.68.RH.3.8: Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
LAFS.68.RH.3.9: Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.
LAFS.68.WHST.1.1: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce claim(s) about a topic or issue, acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
  2. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text, using credible sources.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
LAFS.68.WHST.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
  3. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
LAFS.68.WHST.2.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.68.WHST.2.5: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.
LAFS.68.WHST.2.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently.
LAFS.68.WHST.3.7: Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
LAFS.68.WHST.3.8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.68.WHST.3.9: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and research.
LAFS.68.WHST.4.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
LAFS.7.SL.1.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
  2. Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
  3. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed.
  4. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.
LAFS.7.SL.1.2: Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.
LAFS.7.SL.1.3: Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
LAFS.7.SL.2.4: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
MAFS.6.SP.1.1: Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers. For example, “How old am I?” is not a statistical question, but “How old are the students in my school?” is a statistical question because one anticipates variability in students’ ages.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.6.SP.1.2: Understand that a set of data collected to answer a statistical question has a distribution which can be described by its center, spread, and overall shape.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.6.SP.1.3: Recognize that a measure of center for a numerical data set summarizes all of its values with a single number, while a measure of variation describes how its values vary with a single number.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.K12.MP.1.1:

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1:

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1: Use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
MAFS.K12.MP.6.1:

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.7.P.8.2: Articulate a position on a health-related issue and support it with accurate health information.
Clarifications:
Bullying prevention, Internet safety, and nutritional choices.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

The primary content for the course pertains to the principles, functions, and organization of government; the origins of the American political system; the roles, rights, responsibilities of United States citizens; and methods of active participation in our political system. The course is embedded with strong geographic and economic components to support civic education instruction.

Mathematics Benchmark Guidance - Social Studies instruction should include opportunities for students to interpret and create representations of historical events and concepts using mathematical tables, charts, and graphs.

Special Notes:

Additional content that may be included in the Grade 8 NAEP Civics assessment includes:

  • Distinctive characteristics of American society
  • Unity/diversity in American society
  • Civil society: nongovernmental associations, groups
  • Nation-states
  • Interaction among nation-states
  • Major governmental, nongovernmental international organizations

The NAEP frameworks for Civics may be accessed at http://www.nagb.org/publications/frameworks/civicsframework.pdf

Instructional Practices
Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

Literacy Standards in Social Studies
Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection is provided by the Florida Association of School Administrators: http://www.fasa.net/4DCGI/cms/review.html?Action=CMS_Document&DocID=139. Please be aware that these resources have not been reviewed by CPALMS and there may be a charge for the use of some of them in this collection.


General Information

Course Number: 2106010 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 6 to 8 Education Courses > Subject: Social Studies > SubSubject: Political Sciences >
Abbreviated Title: M/J CIVICS
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
  • Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Core Academic Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 6,7,8



Educator Certifications

Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Political Science (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 5-9)
History (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Elementary Education (Grades K-6)


There are more than 592 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/17036