Access Biology 1 (#7920015) 

{ Biology 1 - 2000310 }


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Course Standards

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SC.912.E.7.1: Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.
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SC.912.E.7.In.1: Identify cycles that occur on Earth, such as the water and carbon cycles, and the role energy plays in them.
SC.912.E.7.Su.1: Recognize the phases of the water cycle that occur on Earth and the role energy plays in the water cycle.
SC.912.E.7.Pa.1: Recognize that clouds release rain (part of the water cycle).

SC.912.L.14.1: Describe the scientific theory of cells (cell theory) and relate the history of its discovery to the process of science.
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SC.912.L.14.In.1: Identify that all living things are made of cells and cells function in similar ways (cell theory).
SC.912.L.14.Su.1: Identify that the cell is the smallest basic unit of life and that all living things are made of cells.
SC.912.L.14.Pa.1: Match parts of common living things to their functions.

SC.912.L.14.2: Relate structure to function for the components of plant and animal cells. Explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (passive and active transport).
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SC.912.L.14.In.2: Identify the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, and cytoplasm, and their basic functions.
SC.912.L.14.Su.2: Recognize that cells have different parts and each has a function.
SC.912.L.14.Pa.1: Match parts of common living things to their functions.

SC.912.L.14.3: Compare and contrast the general structures of plant and animal cells. Compare and contrast the general structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
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SC.912.L.14.In.2: Identify the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, and cytoplasm, and their basic functions.
SC.912.L.14.Su.2: Recognize that cells have different parts and each has a function.
SC.912.L.14.Pa.1: Match parts of common living things to their functions.

SC.912.L.14.4: Compare and contrast structure and function of various types of microscopes.
SC.912.L.14.6: Explain the significance of genetic factors, environmental factors, and pathogenic agents to health from the perspectives of both individual and public health.
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SC.912.L.14.In.4: Describe common human health issues.
SC.912.L.14.Su.3: Recognize common human health issues.
SC.912.L.14.Pa.3: Identify ways to prevent infection from bacteria and viruses, such as hand washing and first aid.

SC.912.L.14.7: Relate the structure of each of the major plant organs and tissues to physiological processes.
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SC.912.L.14.In.5: Describe the general processes of food production, support, water transport, and reproduction in the major parts of plants.
SC.912.L.14.Su.4: Relate parts of plants, such as leaf, stem, root, seed, and flower, to the functions of food production, support, water transport, and reproduction.
SC.912.L.14.Pa.4: Recognize major plant parts, such as root, stem, leaf, and flower.

SC.912.L.14.26: Identify the major parts of the brain on diagrams or models.
SC.912.L.14.36: Describe the factors affecting blood flow through the cardiovascular system.
SC.912.L.14.52: Explain the basic functions of the human immune system, including specific and nonspecific immune response, vaccines, and antibiotics.
SC.912.L.15.1: Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change.
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SC.912.L.15.In.1: Identify that prehistoric plants and animals changed over time (evolved) or became extinct.
SC.912.L.15.Su.1: Match fossils to related species.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.1: Recognize that plants and animals change as they age.

SC.912.L.15.4: Describe how and why organisms are hierarchically classified and based on evolutionary relationships.
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SC.912.L.15.In.2: Classify living organisms into their kingdoms.
SC.912.L.15.Su.2: Match organisms to the animal, plant, and fungus kingdoms.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.2: Sort common living things into plant and animal kingdoms.

SC.912.L.15.5: Explain the reasons for changes in how organisms are classified.
SC.912.L.15.6: Discuss distinguishing characteristics of the domains and kingdoms of living organisms.
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SC.912.L.15.In.2: Classify living organisms into their kingdoms.
SC.912.L.15.Su.2: Match organisms to the animal, plant, and fungus kingdoms.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.2: Sort common living things into plant and animal kingdoms.

SC.912.L.15.8: Describe the scientific explanations of the origin of life on Earth.
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SC.912.L.15.In.3: Identify that there are scientific explanations of the origin of life on Earth.
SC.912.L.15.Su.3: Recognize that there are scientific explanations of how life began.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.1: Recognize that plants and animals change as they age.

SC.912.L.15.10: Identify basic trends in hominid evolution from early ancestors six million years ago to modern humans, including brain size, jaw size, language, and manufacture of tools.
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SC.912.L.15.In.4: Recognize ways that the appearance of humans, their language, and their tools have changed over time.
SC.912.L.15.Su.4: Recognize that humans have changed in appearance over a very long period of time.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.1: Recognize that plants and animals change as they age.

SC.912.L.15.13: Describe the conditions required for natural selection, including: overproduction of offspring, inherited variation, and the struggle to survive, which result in differential reproductive success.
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SC.912.L.15.In.5: Recognize that some living things produce very large numbers of offspring to ensure that enough survive to continue the species (a condition for natural selection).
SC.912.L.15.Su.5: Recognize that some living things, such as fish and turtles, produce very large numbers of offspring because most will die as a result of dangers in the environment before they grow up.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.3: Recognize that animals produce offspring.

SC.912.L.15.14: Discuss mechanisms of evolutionary change other than natural selection such as genetic drift and gene flow.
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SC.912.L.15.In.6: Identify that prehistoric plants and animals changed over time (evolved) or became extinct.
SC.912.L.15.Su.1: Match fossils to related species.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.1: Recognize that plants and animals change as they age.

SC.912.L.15.15: Describe how mutation and genetic recombination increase genetic variation.
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SC.912.L.15.Su.6: Recognize that characteristics of the offspring of living things are sometimes different from their parents.
SC.912.L.15.Pa.4: Recognize differences in physical characteristics within a species of animals, such as different types of dogs.

SC.912.L.16.1: Use Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment to analyze patterns of inheritance.
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SC.912.L.16.In.1: Identify that genes are sets of instructions that determine which characteristics are passed from parent to offspring.
SC.912.L.16.Su.1: Recognize characteristics (traits) that offspring inherit from parents.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.1: Recognize similar characteristics (traits) between a child and parents, such as hair, eye, and skin color, or height.

SC.912.L.16.2: Discuss observed inheritance patterns caused by various modes of inheritance, including dominant, recessive, codominant, sex-linked, polygenic, and multiple alleles.
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SC.912.L.16.In.2: Identify traits that plants and animals, including humans, inherit.
SC.912.L.16.Su.1: Recognize characteristics (traits) that offspring inherit from parents.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.1: Recognize similar characteristics (traits) between a child and parents, such as hair, eye, and skin color, or height.

SC.912.L.16.3: Describe the basic process of DNA replication and how it relates to the transmission and conservation of the genetic information.
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SC.912.L.16.In.3: Recognize that a substance called DNA carries genetic information in all organisms, and changes (mutations) in DNA can be helpful or harmful to an organism.
SC.912.L.16.Su.2: Recognize that all organisms have a substance called DNA with unique information.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.2: Recognize similarities in characteristics of plants and animals of the same type (species).

SC.912.L.16.4: Explain how mutations in the DNA sequence may or may not result in phenotypic change. Explain how mutations in gametes may result in phenotypic changes in offspring.
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SC.912.L.16.In.3: Recognize that a substance called DNA carries genetic information in all organisms, and changes (mutations) in DNA can be helpful or harmful to an organism.
SC.912.L.16.Su.2: Recognize that all organisms have a substance called DNA with unique information.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.2: Recognize similarities in characteristics of plants and animals of the same type (species).

SC.912.L.16.5: Explain the basic processes of transcription and translation, and how they result in the expression of genes.
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SC.912.L.16.In.3: Recognize that a substance called DNA carries genetic information in all organisms, and changes (mutations) in DNA can be helpful or harmful to an organism.
SC.912.L.16.Su.2: Recognize that all organisms have a substance called DNA with unique information.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.2: Recognize similarities in characteristics of plants and animals of the same type (species).

SC.912.L.16.8: Explain the relationship between mutation, cell cycle, and uncontrolled cell growth potentially resulting in cancer.
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SC.912.L.16.In.4: Identify that cancer can result when cells change or grow uncontrollably.
SC.912.L.16.Su.3: Recognize that cancer may result when cells change or grow too fast.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.3: Recognize that illness can result when parts of our bodies are not working properly.

SC.912.L.16.9: Explain how and why the genetic code is universal and is common to almost all organisms.
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Name Description
SC.912.L.16.In.3: Recognize that a substance called DNA carries genetic information in all organisms, and changes (mutations) in DNA can be helpful or harmful to an organism.
SC.912.L.16.Su.2: Recognize that all organisms have a substance called DNA with unique information.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.2: Recognize similarities in characteristics of plants and animals of the same type (species).

SC.912.L.16.10: Evaluate the impact of biotechnology on the individual, society and the environment, including medical and ethical issues.
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SC.912.L.16.In.5: Identify ways that biotechnology has impacted society and the environment, such as the development of new medicines and farming techniques.
SC.912.L.16.Su.4: Recognize that new medicines and foods can be developed by science (biotechnology).
SC.912.L.16.Pa.4: Recognize a food.

SC.912.L.16.13: Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the human reproductive system. Describe the process of human development from fertilization to birth and major changes that occur in each trimester of pregnancy.
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SC.912.L.16.In.6: Describe the basic process of human development from fertilization to birth.
SC.912.L.16.Su.5: Recognize major phases in the process of human development from fertilization to birth.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.5: Recognize the sequence of human development from baby to child to adult.

SC.912.L.16.14: Describe the cell cycle, including the process of mitosis. Explain the role of mitosis in the formation of new cells and its importance in maintaining chromosome number during asexual reproduction.
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SC.912.L.16.In.7: Recognize that cells reproduce by dividing to produce new cells that are identical (mitosis) or new cells that are different (meiosis).
SC.912.L.16.Su.6: Recognize that cells reproduce by dividing.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.6: Recognize that living things produce offspring (reproduce).

SC.912.L.16.16: Describe the process of meiosis, including independent assortment and crossing over. Explain how reduction division results in the formation of haploid gametes or spores.
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Name Description
SC.912.L.16.In.7: Recognize that cells reproduce by dividing to produce new cells that are identical (mitosis) or new cells that are different (meiosis).
SC.912.L.16.Su.6: Recognize that cells reproduce by dividing.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.6: Recognize that living things produce offspring (reproduce).

SC.912.L.16.17: Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis and relate to the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction and their consequences for genetic variation.
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SC.912.L.16.Su.6: Recognize that cells reproduce by dividing.
SC.912.L.16.Pa.6: Recognize that living things produce offspring (reproduce).

SC.912.L.17.2: Explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.
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SC.912.L.17.In.1: Recognize that living things in oceans and fresh water are affected by the location, availability of light, depth of the water, and temperature.
SC.912.L.17.Su.1: Recognize that living things in bodies of water are affected by the location and depth of the water.
SC.912.L.17.Pa.1: Recognize common living things in bodies of water.

SC.912.L.17.4: Describe changes in ecosystems resulting from seasonal variations, climate change and succession.
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SC.912.L.17.In.2: Identify that living things in an ecosystem are affected by changes in the environment, such as changes to the food supply, climate change, or the introduction of predators.
SC.912.L.17.Su.2: Recognize how animals and plants in an ecosystem may be affected by changes to the food supply or climate.
SC.912.L.17.Pa.2: Recognize what happens to plants and animals when they don’t get enough food or water.

SC.912.L.17.5: Analyze how population size is determined by births, deaths, immigration, emigration, and limiting factors (biotic and abiotic) that determine carrying capacity.
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SC.912.L.17.In.2: Identify that living things in an ecosystem are affected by changes in the environment, such as changes to the food supply, climate change, or the introduction of predators.
SC.912.L.17.Su.2: Recognize how animals and plants in an ecosystem may be affected by changes to the food supply or climate.
SC.912.L.17.Pa.2: Recognize what happens to plants and animals when they don’t get enough food or water.

SC.912.L.17.8: Recognize the consequences of the losses of biodiversity due to catastrophic events, climate changes, human activity, and the introduction of invasive, non-native species.
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SC.912.L.17.In.4: Recognize possible changes in an ecosystem (biodiversity) that can result from natural catastrophic events, changes in climate, and human activity.
SC.912.L.17.Su.4: Recognize changes in living things (biodiversity) that can result from natural catastrophic events and human activity.
SC.912.L.17.Pa.4: Recognize actions that are harmful to living things.

SC.912.L.17.9: Use a food web to identify and distinguish producers, consumers, and decomposers. Explain the pathway of energy transfer through trophic levels and the reduction of available energy at successive trophic levels.
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SC.912.L.17.In.5: Identify the components of a food web, including sunlight, producers, consumers, and decomposers, and trace the flow of energy from the Sun.
SC.912.L.17.Su.5: Identify producers, consumers, and decomposers in a simple food chain.
SC.912.L.17.Pa.5: Recognize that animals (consumers) eat animals and plants for food.

SC.912.L.17.11: Evaluate the costs and benefits of renewable and nonrenewable resources, such as water, energy, fossil fuels, wildlife, and forests.
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SC.912.L.17.In.7: Identify types of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources and explain the need for conservation.
SC.912.L.17.Su.7: Identify a way to conserve a familiar, nonrenewable, natural resource.
SC.912.L.17.Pa.6: Recognize the importance of clean water for living things.

SC.912.L.17.13: Discuss the need for adequate monitoring of environmental parameters when making policy decisions.
SC.912.L.17.20: Predict the impact of individuals on environmental systems and examine how human lifestyles affect sustainability.
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SC.912.L.17.In.8: Describe ways the lifestyles of individuals and groups can help or hurt the environment.
SC.912.L.17.Su.8: Identify ways individuals can help the environment.
SC.912.L.17.Pa.7: Recognize a way to help the local environment.

SC.912.L.18.1: Describe the basic molecular structures and primary functions of the four major categories of biological macromolecules.
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SC.912.L.18.In.1: Identify that carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and nucleic acids (macromolecules) are important for human organisms.
SC.912.L.18.Su.1: Recognize that humans use proteins, carbohydrates, and fats.
SC.912.L.18.Pa.1: Recognize that humans need different kinds of food.

SC.912.L.18.7: Identify the reactants, products, and basic functions of photosynthesis.
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SC.912.L.18.In.2: Identify the products and function of photosynthesis.
SC.912.L.18.Su.2: Recognize that the function of photosynthesis is to produce food for plants.
SC.912.L.18.Pa.2: Recognize that plants need water, light, and air to grow.

SC.912.L.18.8: Identify the reactants, products, and basic functions of aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration.
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SC.912.L.18.In.3: Identify that cells release energy from food so the organism can use it (cellular respiration).
SC.912.L.18.Su.3: Recognize that cells get energy from food.
SC.912.L.18.Pa.3: Identify that food is a source of energy.

SC.912.L.18.9: Explain the interrelated nature of photosynthesis and cellular respiration.
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SC.912.L.18.In.4: Recognize that plants give off oxygen that is used by animals and animals give off carbon dioxide that is used by plants.
SC.912.L.18.Su.4: Recognize that people and animals breathe in the oxygen that plants give off.
SC.912.L.18.Pa.2: Recognize that plants need water, light, and air to grow.

SC.912.L.18.10: Connect the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to energy transfers within a cell.
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SC.912.L.18.In.5: Recognize that energy is stored in cells.
SC.912.L.18.Su.3: Recognize that cells get energy from food.
SC.912.L.18.Pa.3: Identify that food is a source of energy.

SC.912.L.18.11: Explain the role of enzymes as catalysts that lower the activation energy of biochemical reactions. Identify factors, such as pH and temperature, and their effect on enzyme activity.
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SC.912.L.18.In.6: Recognize that enzymes break down food molecules during the digestive process.
SC.912.L.18.Su.5: Recognize that food is broken down in digestion (use of enzymes).
SC.912.L.18.Pa.4: Recognize that saliva helps people eat when they chew.

SC.912.L.18.12: Discuss the special properties of water that contribute to Earth's suitability as an environment for life: cohesive behavior, ability to moderate temperature, expansion upon freezing, and versatility as a solvent.
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SC.912.L.18.In.7: Identify that special properties of water, such as the ability to moderate temperature and dissolve substances, help to sustain living things on Earth.
SC.912.L.18.Su.6: Identify the important role of water in sustaining life of plants and animals.
SC.912.L.18.Pa.5: Recognize that plants and animals use water to live.

SC.912.N.1.1: Define a problem based on a specific  body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following: 
  1. Pose questions about the natural world, (Articulate the purpose of the investigation and identify the relevant scientific concepts).
  2. Conduct systematic observations, (Write procedures that are clear and replicable. Identify observables and examine relationships between test (independent) variable and outcome (dependent) variable. Employ appropriate methods for accurate and consistent observations; conduct and record measurements at appropriate levels of precision. Follow safety guidelines).
  3. Examine books and other sources of information to see what is already known,
  4. Review what is known in light of empirical evidence, (Examine whether available empirical evidence can be interpreted in terms of existing knowledge and models, and if not, modify or develop new models).
  5. Plan investigations, (Design and evaluate a scientific investigation).
  6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs), (Collect data or evidence in an organized way. Properly use instruments, equipment, and materials (e.g., scales, probeware, meter sticks, microscopes, computers) including set-up, calibration, technique, maintenance, and storage).
  7. Pose answers, explanations, or descriptions of events,
  8. Generate explanations that explicate or describe natural phenomena (inferences),
  9. Use appropriate evidence and reasoning to justify these explanations to others,
  10. Communicate results of scientific investigations, and
  11. Evaluate the merits of the explanations produced by others.
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SC.912.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Identify a scientific question 2. Examine reliable sources of informtion to identify what is already known 3. Develop a possible explanation (hypothesis) 4. Plan and carry out an experiment 5. Gather data based on measurement and observations 6. Evaluate the data 7. Use the data to support reasonable explanations, inferences, and conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Recognize a scientific question 2. Use reliable information and identify what is already known 3. Create possible explanation 4. Carry out a planned experiment 5. Record observations 6. Summarize results 7. Reach a reasonable conclusion.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Observe objects and activities 2. Follow planned procedures 3. Recognize a solution.

SC.912.N.1.3: Recognize that the strength or usefulness of a scientific claim is evaluated through scientific argumentation, which depends on  critical and logical thinking, and the active consideration of alternative scientific explanations to explain the data presented.
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SC.912.N.1.In.2: Describe the processes used in scientific investigations, including posing a research question, forming a hypothesis, reviewing what is known, collecting evidence, evaluating results, and reaching conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.2: Identify the basic process used in scientific investigations, including questioning, observing, recording, determining, and sharing results.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.2: Recognize a process used in science to solve problems, such as observing, following procedures, and recognizing results.

SC.912.N.1.4: Identify sources of information and assess their reliability according to the strict standards of scientific investigation.
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SC.912.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Identify a scientific question 2. Examine reliable sources of informtion to identify what is already known 3. Develop a possible explanation (hypothesis) 4. Plan and carry out an experiment 5. Gather data based on measurement and observations 6. Evaluate the data 7. Use the data to support reasonable explanations, inferences, and conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Recognize a scientific question 2. Use reliable information and identify what is already known 3. Create possible explanation 4. Carry out a planned experiment 5. Record observations 6. Summarize results 7. Reach a reasonable conclusion.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Observe objects and activities 2. Follow planned procedures 3. Recognize a solution.

SC.912.N.1.6: Describe how scientific inferences are drawn from scientific observations and provide examples from the content being studied.
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SC.912.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Identify a scientific question 2. Examine reliable sources of informtion to identify what is already known 3. Develop a possible explanation (hypothesis) 4. Plan and carry out an experiment 5. Gather data based on measurement and observations 6. Evaluate the data 7. Use the data to support reasonable explanations, inferences, and conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Recognize a scientific question 2. Use reliable information and identify what is already known 3. Create possible explanation 4. Carry out a planned experiment 5. Record observations 6. Summarize results 7. Reach a reasonable conclusion.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Observe objects and activities 2. Follow planned procedures 3. Recognize a solution.

SC.912.N.2.1: Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).
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SC.912.N.2.In.1: Identify examples of investigations that involve science.
SC.912.N.2.Su.1: Identify questions that can be answered by science.
SC.912.N.2.Pa.1: Recognize an example of work by scientists.

SC.912.N.2.2: Identify which questions can be answered through science and which questions are outside the boundaries of scientific investigation, such as questions addressed by other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, and religion.
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SC.912.N.2.In.2: Distinguish between questions that can be answered by science and observable information and questions that can’t be answered by science and observable information.
SC.912.N.2.Su.1: Identify questions that can be answered by science.
SC.912.N.2.Pa.1: Recognize an example of work by scientists.

SC.912.N.3.1: Explain that a scientific theory is the culmination of many scientific investigations drawing together all the current evidence concerning a substantial range of phenomena; thus, a scientific theory represents the most powerful explanation scientists have to offer.
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SC.912.N.3.In.1: Recognize that a scientific theory is developed by repeated investigations of many scientists and agreement on the likely explanation.
SC.912.N.3.Su.1: Recognize that scientific theories are supported by evidence and agreement of many scientists.
SC.912.N.3.Pa.1: Recognize examples of cause-effect descriptions or explanations related to science.

SC.912.N.3.4: Recognize that theories do not become laws, nor do laws become theories; theories are well supported explanations and laws are well supported descriptions.
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SC.912.N.3.In.1: Recognize that a scientific theory is developed by repeated investigations of many scientists and agreement on the likely explanation.
SC.912.N.3.In.2: Identify examples of scientific laws that describe relationships in the natural world, such as Newton’s laws.
SC.912.N.3.Su.1: Recognize that scientific theories are supported by evidence and agreement of many scientists.
SC.912.N.3.Su.2: Recognize examples of scientific laws that describe relationships in nature, such as Newton’s laws.
SC.912.N.3.Pa.1: Recognize examples of cause-effect descriptions or explanations related to science.

LAFS.910.RST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.
LAFS.910.RST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.
LAFS.910.RST.1.3 (Archived Standard): Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks, attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.
LAFS.910.RST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.
LAFS.910.RST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force, energy).
LAFS.910.RST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, defining the question the author seeks to address.
LAFS.910.RST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
LAFS.910.RST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claim or a recommendation for solving a scientific or technical problem.
LAFS.910.RST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those from other sources (including their own experiments), noting when the findings support or contradict previous explanations or accounts.
LAFS.910.RST.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.1a: Clarify, verify or challenge ideas and conclusions within a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.1b: Summarize points of agreement and disagreement within a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.1c: Use evidence and reasoning presented in discussion on topic or text to make new connections with own view or understanding.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.1d: Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision making.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.1e: Actively seek the ideas or opinions of others in a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.1f: Engage appropriately in discussion with others who have a diverse or divergent perspective.

LAFS.910.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.2a: Analyze credibility of sources and accuracy of information presented in social media regarding a given topic or text.

LAFS.910.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.3a: Determine the speaker’s point of view or purpose in a text.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.3b: Determine what arguments the speaker makes.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.3c: Evaluate the evidence used to make the argument.
LAFS.910.SL.1.AP.3d: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning and use of evidence for false statements, faulty reasoning or exaggeration.

LAFS.910.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.910.SL.2.AP.4a: Orally report on a topic, with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details that support the main ideas.

LAFS.910.SL.2.5 (Archived Standard): Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.910.SL.2.AP.5a: Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.

LAFS.910.WHST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
LAFS.910.WHST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
LAFS.910.WHST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.910.WHST.4.10 (Archived Standard): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
HE.912.C.1.3: Evaluate how environment and personal health are interrelated.
Clarifications:
Food options within a community; prenatal-care services; availability of recreational facilities; air quality; weather-safety awareness; and weather, air, and water conditions.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.912.C.1.In.c: Explain how environment and personal health are interrelated, such as food options within a community and availability of recreational facilities.
HE.912.C.1.Su.c: Identify ways selected environmental factors can affect personal health, such as food options within a community and availability of recreational facilities.
HE.912.C.1.Pa.c: Recognize environmental factors and related personal health behaviors, such as having recreational facilities available and increased physical activity.

HE.912.C.1.5: Analyze strategies for prevention, detection, and treatment of communicable and chronic diseases.
Clarifications:
Health prevention, detection, and treatment of: breast and testicular cancer, suicide, obesity, and industrial-related chronic disease.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.912.C.1.In.e: Describe strategies for prevention, detection, and treatment of common communicable and chronic diseases, such as preventing and treating obesity, early detection of cancer, and getting adequate physical exercise to help prevent diabetes and heart disease.
HE.912.C.1.Su.e: Identify common strategies for prevention, detection, and treatment of common communicable and chronic diseases, such as preventing and treating obesity, early detection of cancer, and getting adequate physical exercise to help prevent diabetes and heart disease.
HE.912.C.1.Pa.e: Recognize selected strategies for prevention of common communicable diseases, such as sanitization, avoiding direct contact with infection, and proper disposal of hygiene products.

HE.912.C.1.7: Analyze how heredity and family history can impact personal health.
Clarifications:
Drug use, family obesity, heart disease, mental health, and non-communicable illness or disease.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.912.C.1.In.g: Explain how heredity and family history can impact personal health, such as drug use, family obesity, heart disease, and mental health.
HE.912.C.1.Su.g: Describe ways personal health can be affected by heredity and family history, such as drug use, family obesity, heart disease, and mental health.
HE.912.C.1.Pa.g: Recognize ways personal health can be affected by heredity or family history, such as drug use, family obesity, heart disease, and mental health.

ELD.K12.ELL.SC.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.1 (Archived Standard): Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1a: Interpret units in the context of the problem.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1b: When solving a multi-step problem, use units to evaluate the appropriateness of the solution.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1c: Choose the appropriate units for a specific formula and interpret the meaning of the unit in that context.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1d: Choose and interpret both the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

MAFS.912.N-Q.1.3 (Archived Standard): Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.3a: Describe the accuracy of measurement when reporting quantities (you can lessen your limitations by measuring precisely).




General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Science.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/sc.pdf.


VERSION REQUIREMENTS

Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection:


General Information

Course Number: 7920015 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Senior High and Adult > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS BIOLOGY 1
Number of Credits: Course may be taken for up to two credits
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12,30,31
Graduation Requirement: Biology



Educator Certifications

Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Biology (Grades 6-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Biology (Grades 6-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Biology (Grades 6-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Biology (Grades 6-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Biology (Grades 6-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


There are more than 1398 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/15514