Access Social Studies - Grade 1 (#7721012) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.1.A.1.1: Develop an understanding of a primary source.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to,  pictures, letters, audio/video recordings, and other artifacts.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.1.In.a: Identify a primary source, such as pictures or artifacts.
SS.1.A.1.Su.a: Recognize a primary source, such as pictures or artifacts.
SS.1.A.1.Pa.a: Recognize an object or photograph related to a person or event.

SS.1.A.1.2: Understand how to use the media center/other sources to find answers to questions about a historical topic.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, databases, audio or video recordings, and books. 
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.1.In.b: Locate information in pictures or print about a historical topic.
SS.1.A.1.Su.b: Use pictures to answer a question about a historical topic.
SS.1.A.1.Pa.b: Recognize a person as a source of information.

SS.1.A.2.1: Understand history tells the story of people and events of other times and places.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.2.In.a: Recognize examples of people and events from other times in stories.
SS.1.A.2.Su.a: Recognize a story about someone living in a different time.
SS.1.A.2.Pa.a: Recognize a past event.

SS.1.A.2.2: Compare life now with life in the past.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, comparing school, families, work, and community life.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.2.In.b: Recognize examples of daily life that are different from long ago.
SS.1.A.2.Su.b: Recognize items that did not exist long ago.
SS.1.A.2.Pa.b: Recognize family members of older generations.

SS.1.A.2.3: Identify celebrations and national holidays as a way of remembering and honoring the heroism and achievements of the people, events, and our nation's ethnic heritage.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, federal holidays and ethnic celebrations.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.2.In.c: Identify national holidays as a way of remembering and honoring people and events, such as Thanksgiving, Independence Day, and Memorial Day.
SS.1.A.2.Su.c: Recognize a national holiday as a way of remembering and honoring people and events, such as Thanksgiving or Independence Day.
SS.1.A.2.Pa.c: Recognize an activity associated with a national celebration, such as a family dinner on Thanksgiving.

SS.1.A.2.4: Identify people from the past who have shown character ideals and principles including honesty, courage, and responsibility.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Presidents, war veterans, community members, and leaders.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.2.In.d: Identify a person from the past who showed bravery, honesty, or responsibility.
SS.1.A.2.Su.d: Recognize a person who showed honesty, bravery, or responsibility.
SS.1.A.2.Pa.d: Recognize a school leader, such as the principal.

SS.1.A.2.5: Distinguish between historical fact and fiction using various materials.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to,  tall tales, fables and non-fiction (expository) text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.2.In.e: Identify events or characters in a story that are not real (fiction), such as Pecos Bill riding a tornado.
SS.1.A.2.Su.e: Recognize a character in a story that is not real (fiction), such as Babe the Blue Ox.
SS.1.A.2.Pa.e: Recognize a character in a story that is not real.

SS.1.A.3.1: Use terms related to time to sequentially order events that have occurred in school, home, or community.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, days, weeks, months, and years.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.3.In.a: Identify concepts of time, including yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
SS.1.A.3.Su.a: Recognize concepts of time, including morning and afternoon, related to school activities.
SS.1.A.3.Pa.a: Associate morning with a common school activity, such as circle time.

SS.1.A.3.2: Create a timeline based on the student's life or school events, using primary sources.
Clarifications:
Examples of sources may include, but are not limited to, photographs, birth certificates, report cards, and diaries.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.A.3.In.b: Sequence three events in a student’s life using photographs or pictures on a timeline.
SS.1.A.3.Su.b: Sequence two events in a student’s life using photographs or pictures.
SS.1.A.3.Pa.b: Recognize one activity that comes next on a classroom daily schedule.

SS.1.C.1.1: Explain the purpose of rules and laws in the school and community.
Clarifications:
Examples are keeping order and ensuring safety.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.1.In.a: Identify reasons for rules that keep students safe in the classroom and school, such as keeping order.
SS.1.C.1.Su.a: Recognize reasons for rules that keep students safe in the classroom and school, such as keeping order.
SS.1.C.1.Pa.a: Associate a classroom rule with a consequence.

SS.1.C.1.2: Give examples of people who have the power and authority to make and enforce rules and laws in the school and community.
Clarifications:
Examples are principals, teachers, parents, government leaders, and police.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.1.In.b: Identify authority figures in the school, such as the teacher, principal, and cafeteria manager.
SS.1.C.1.Su.b: Recognize an authority figure in the school, such as the teacher or principal.
SS.1.C.1.Pa.b: Recognize the teacher as the classroom leader.

SS.1.C.1.3: Give examples of the use of power without authority in the school and community.
Clarifications:
Examples are bullying, stealing, and peer pressure.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.1.In.c: Identify an example of the use of power without authority in the classroom or school, such as bullying and stealing.
SS.1.C.1.Su.c: Recognize an example of the use of power without authority in the classroom or school, such as bullying or stealing.
SS.1.C.1.Pa.c: Recognize ownership of personal belongings.

SS.1.C.2.1: Explain the rights and responsibilities students have in the school community.
Clarifications:
Examples are not littering, coming to school on time, and having a safe learning environment.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.2.In.a: Identify student responsibilities in the classroom and school, such as completing tasks and following rules.
SS.1.C.2.Su.a: Recognize ways to be responsible in the classroom, such as completing tasks.
SS.1.C.2.Pa.a: Associate completing a task with a classroom responsibility.

SS.1.C.2.2: Describe the characteristics of responsible citizenship in the school community.
Clarifications:
Examples are follow rules, care about the environment, and respect others.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.2.In.b: Identify ways to be good citizens in the school, such as by taking care of school property and following school rules.
SS.1.C.2.Su.b: Recognize a way to be a good citizen in the school, such as by taking care of school property.
SS.1.C.2.Pa.b: Associate completing a task with responsible citizenship in the classroom.

SS.1.C.2.3: Identify ways students can participate in the betterment of their school and community.
Clarifications:
Examples are responsible decision making, classroom jobs, and school service projects.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.2.In.c: Identify ways to be good citizens in the school, such as by taking care of school property and following school rules.
SS.1.C.2.Su.c: Recognize a way to be a good citizen in the school, such as by taking care of school property.
SS.1.C.2.Pa.c: Associate completing a task with responsible citizenship in the classroom.

SS.1.C.2.4: Show respect and kindness to people and animals.
SS.1.C.3.1: Explain how decisions can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways.
Clarifications:
Examples are talking about problems, role playing, listening, and sharing.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.3.In.a: Identify ways to make a decision or resolve a conflict, such as talking about problems or listening to each other.
SS.1.C.3.Su.a: Recognize ways to make a decision or resolve a conflict, such as talking about problems or listening to each other.
SS.1.C.3.Pa.a: Recognize a way to make a decision or resolve a conflict, such as making a choice or taking turns.

SS.1.C.3.2: Recognize symbols and individuals that represent American constitutional democracy.
Clarifications:
Examples are United States flag, Pledge of Allegiance, National Anthem, Statue of Liberty, bald eagle, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and the current President.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.C.3.In.b: Recognize symbols and individuals that represent America, such as the American flag, Pledge of Allegiance, bald eagle, and current president.
SS.1.C.3.Su.b: Recognize symbols that represent America, such as the American flag or Pledge of Allegiance.
SS.1.C.3.Pa.b: Recognize the American flag.

SS.1.E.1.1: Recognize that money is a method of exchanging goods and services.
Clarifications:
An example is coins/bills versus bartering or trading.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.E.1.In.a: Identify coins and bills as forms of money that can be used to buy things.
SS.1.E.1.Su.a: Identify coins as money that can be used to buy things.
SS.1.E.1.Pa.a: Recognize an item that can be traded for something else in the classroom.

SS.1.E.1.2: Define opportunity costs as giving up one thing for another.
Clarifications:
Examples are giving up television to do homework and buying candy versus saving for later purchase.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.E.1.In.b: Recognize an example of opportunity costs, such as giving up watching television to play with a friend.
SS.1.E.1.Su.b: Recognize a situation that involves making a choice, such as watching a video or playing a game.
SS.1.E.1.Pa.b: Recognize an item that can be traded for something else in the classroom.

SS.1.E.1.3: Distinguish between examples of goods and services.
Clarifications:
Examples are goods: hamburger; services: sweeping the floor.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.E.1.In.c: Recognize examples of goods and services.
SS.1.E.1.Su.c: Recognize examples of goods.
SS.1.E.1.Pa.c: Recognize an example of goods.

SS.1.E.1.4: Distinguish people as buyers, sellers, and producers of goods and services.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.E.1.In.d: Identify the difference between a buyer and seller.
SS.1.E.1.Su.d: Recognize that people buy goods in a store.
SS.1.E.1.Pa.d: Recognize an item that can be traded for something else in the classroom.

SS.1.E.1.5: Recognize the importance of saving money for future purchases.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.E.1.In.e: Recognize ways that people save money, such as in a bank or other safe place.
SS.1.E.1.Su.e: Recognize a way to save money, such as putting it in a bank.
SS.1.E.1.Pa.e: Recognize that an item can be saved for later.

SS.1.E.1.6: Identify that people need to make choices because of scarce resources.
Clarifications:
Examples are not enough time to do all activities or not enough red crayons.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.E.1.In.f: Recognize that when there is not enough of something (scarce resource), people need to make choices, such as sharing, saving, or doing without.
SS.1.E.1.Su.f: Recognize when there is not enough of something (scarce resource).
SS.1.E.1.Pa.f: Associate not enough with no more.

SS.1.G.1.1: Use physical and political/cultural maps to locate places in Florida.
Clarifications:
Examples are Tallahassee, student's hometown, Lake Okeechobee, Florida Keys, and the Everglades.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.G.1.In.a: Identify a map of the local community or Florida.
SS.1.G.1.Su.a: Recognize a pictorial map of the local community or Florida.
SS.1.G.1.Pa.a: Recognize a drawing of home or school.

SS.1.G.1.2: Identify key elements (compass rose, cardinal directions, title, key/legend with symbols) of maps and globes .
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.G.1.In.b: Recognize elements in a key/legend on a simple map or drawing of a location, such as pictures and symbols.
SS.1.G.1.Su.b: Recognize an element in a key/legend on a pictorial map or drawing of a location, such as pictures or symbols.
SS.1.G.1.Pa.b: Associate an object, picture, or symbol with a location.

SS.1.G.1.3: Construct a basic map using key elements including cardinal directions and map symbols.
Clarifications:
Examples are map of bedroom, classroom, or route to school
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.G.1.In.c: Construct a simple map using map symbols.
SS.1.G.1.Su.c: Complete a pictorial map using pictures or symbols for designated areas.
SS.1.G.1.Pa.c: Associate an object, picture, or symbol with a location.

SS.1.G.1.4: Identify a variety of physical features using a map and globe.
Clarifications:
Examples are oceans, peninsulas, lakes, rivers, swamps, and gulfs.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.G.1.In.d: Identify land and water on a map and globe, such as by using the color key—blue is water, and green/brown is land.
SS.1.G.1.Su.d: Recognize land and water on a map and globe, such as by using the color key—blue is water and green/brown is land.
SS.1.G.1.Pa.d: Recognize a picture of land or water.

SS.1.G.1.5: Locate on maps and globes the student's local community, Florida, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.G.1.In.e: Locate Florida and a major body of water on maps or globes, such as the Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico.
SS.1.G.1.Su.e: Recognize land and water on a map and globe, such as by using the color key—blue is water and green/brown is land.
SS.1.G.1.Pa.e: Recognize a picture of land or water.

SS.1.G.1.6: Describe how location, weather, and physical environment affect the way people live in our community.
Clarifications:
Examples are effects on their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.1.G.1.In.f: Recognize selected ways location, weather, and physical environment affect people in the student’s community, such as their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation.
SS.1.G.1.Su.f: Recognize a way location, weather, or physical environment affects people in the student’s community, such as their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, or recreation.
SS.1.G.1.Pa.f: Associate a selected characteristic of the student’s environment, such as food, clothing, or shelter, with its personal effect on the student.

LAFS.1.RI.1.1 (Archived Standard): Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.1a: Answer questions about key details in a text read, read aloud or viewed.
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.1b: Ask questions about key details in a text read, read aloud or viewed.

LAFS.1.RI.1.2 (Archived Standard): Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.2a: Discuss key details and the main topic of a preferred text.
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.2b: Identify the main topic of an informational text.
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.2c: Retell/identify key details in an informational text.

LAFS.1.RI.1.3 (Archived Standard): Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.3a: Describe the connection between two individuals in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.3b: Describe the connection between events in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.1.AP.3c: Describe the connection between pieces of information in a text.

LAFS.1.RI.2.4 (Archived Standard): Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.4a: Ask questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.4b: Answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.4c: Ask questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of phrases in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.4d: Answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of phrases in a text.

LAFS.1.RI.2.5 (Archived Standard): Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.5a: Identify text features to aid comprehension.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.5b: Use text features to aid comprehension.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.5c: Identify and use various text features (e.g., bold text, titles) to locate key facts or information in a text.

LAFS.1.RI.2.6 (Archived Standard): Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.6a: Identify the information provided by pictures or other illustrations in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.6b: Identify the information provided by words in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.6c: Compare and contrast the information provided by pictures or other illustrations in a text.
LAFS.1.RI.2.AP.6d: Compare and contrast the information provided by words in a text.

LAFS.1.RI.3.7 (Archived Standard): Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.3.AP.7a: Use the photos, diagrams or graphics in a text to describe or identify its key ideas.
LAFS.1.RI.3.AP.7b: Use the details in a text to describe its key ideas.

LAFS.1.RI.3.8 (Archived Standard): Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.3.AP.8a: Identify the facts and details an author gives to support points in a text.

LAFS.1.RI.3.9 (Archived Standard): Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.3.AP.9a: Identify basic similarities in two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions or procedures).
LAFS.1.RI.3.AP.9b: Identify basic differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions or procedures).

LAFS.1.RI.4.10 (Archived Standard): With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for grade 1.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.RI.4.AP.10a: Choose text of increasing complexity to read and reread, listen to or view for informational purposes (e.g., to answer questions; understand the world around them).

LAFS.1.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  1. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  2. Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.
  3. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.1b: Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.1c: Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics or texts under discussion.

LAFS.1.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.2a: Engage in small or large group discussion of texts or topics presented orally or through other media.
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.2b: Answer questions about key details in a story (e.g., who, what, when, where, why) or information presented orally or through other media.
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.2c: Ask questions about key details in a story or information presented orally or through other media.

LAFS.1.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.3a: Ask questions about information presented (orally or in writing) in order to clarify something that is not understood.
LAFS.1.SL.1.AP.3b: Answer questions about what a speaker says.

LAFS.1.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.SL.2.AP.4a: Retell a text, including key details.
LAFS.1.SL.2.AP.4b: Describe factual information about people, places, things and events with relevant details orally or in writing.
LAFS.1.SL.2.AP.4c: Present, orally or in writing, factual information of familiar people, places, things and events describing subtopics of larger topics.
LAFS.1.SL.2.AP.4d: Describe ideas about familiar people, places, things and events with details orally or in writing.
LAFS.1.SL.2.AP.4e: Describe people, places, things and events with relevant details.
LAFS.1.SL.2.AP.4f: Describe a single event or a series of events that includes details about what happened orally or in writing.
LAFS.1.SL.2.AP.4g: Describe familiar people, places, things and events with details orally or in writing.

LAFS.1.W.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.1a: Use descriptions and details of familiar people, places, things and events to support an opinion.
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.1b: Write, draw or dictate an opinion statement using accurate information as reasoning about a topic or book of interest.
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.1c: Organize an opinion piece starting with a topical or opinion statement followed by reasons.
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.1d: Write an opinion piece that includes a sense of closure.

LAFS.1.W.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.2a: Write simple statements that name a topic and supply some facts about the topic.
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.2b: Provide a concluding statement or section to a permanent product.

LAFS.1.W.1.3 (Archived Standard): Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.3a: Describe orally or in writing a single event or a series of events that includes details about what happened.
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.3b: When appropriate, write about a series of events in the order in which they occurred using signal words (e.g., first, then, next).
LAFS.1.W.1.AP.3c: Write a narrative that includes a sense of closure.

LAFS.1.W.2.5 (Archived Standard): With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.W.2.AP.5a: With guidance and support, use feedback on a topic (e.g., additional text, drawings, visual displays, labels) to strengthen writing.
LAFS.1.W.2.AP.5b: With guidance and support, use feedback (e.g., elaborate on story elements) to strengthen narrative writing.
LAFS.1.W.2.AP.5c: With guidance and support, use feedback (e.g., drawings, visual displays, labels) to strengthen persuasive writing.
LAFS.1.W.2.AP.5d: With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from others to strengthen writing.
LAFS.1.W.2.AP.5e: With guidance and support from adults, work with a peer to evaluate a permanent product.

LAFS.1.W.2.6 (Archived Standard): With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.W.2.AP.6a: With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools (e.g., word processing, Internet) to produce and publish writing, including collaborating with peers.
LAFS.1.W.2.AP.6b: With guidance and support from adults, use a writing template, tool or mentor text to develop writing skills.

LAFS.1.W.3.7 (Archived Standard): Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how-to” books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.W.3.AP.7a: Participate in shared research to gather information about a topic (e.g., drawings, visual displays, labels).
LAFS.1.W.3.AP.7b: Participate in a shared writing project to produce a product to represent the group's research.
LAFS.1.W.3.AP.7c: Generate ideas and/or opinions when participating in shared writing projects.

LAFS.1.W.3.8 (Archived Standard): With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1.W.3.AP.8a: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences to answer a question.
LAFS.1.W.3.AP.8b: Utilize various sources (e.g., word wall, book talks, visuals/images, Internet) that are provided to gather information in order to answer questions (how do we find out?).
LAFS.1.W.3.AP.8c: Use illustrations and details in a text to obtain facts and compose information on a topic.

MAFS.K12.MP.1.1 (Archived Standard):

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1 (Archived Standard):

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1 (Archived Standard): Use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
MAFS.K12.MP.6.1 (Archived Standard):

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.K.C.2.4: Explain the importance of rules to maintain health.
Clarifications:
Walk don't run, wait your turn, keep your hands and feet to yourself, and play fair.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.K.C.2.In.d: Recognize the importance of rules to maintain health, such as avoiding accidents by walking instead of running, waiting one’s turn, and keeping hands and feet to oneself.
HE.K.C.2.Su.d: Recognize the importance of a rule to maintain health, such as walking instead of running, waiting one’s turn, or keeping hands and feet to oneself.
HE.K.C.2.Pa.d: Associate a classroom rule with health, such as waiting one’s turn or keeping hands and feet to oneself.




General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf.


General Information

Course Number: 7721012 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Elementary > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS SOC ST - 1
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 1



Educator Certifications

Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


There are more than 181 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/15470