M/J Literacy through Philosophy (#1010020) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
LAFS.8.L.1.1 (Archived Standard): Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  1. Explain the function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) in general and their function in particular sentences.
  2. Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.
  3. Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood.
  4. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.
LAFS.8.L.1.2 (Archived Standard): Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  1. Use punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause or break.
  2. Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission.
  3. Spell correctly.
LAFS.8.L.2.3 (Archived Standard): Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  1. Use verbs in the active and passive voice and in the conditional and subjunctive mood to achieve particular effects (e.g., emphasizing the actor or the action; expressing uncertainty or describing a state contrary to fact).
LAFS.8.L.3.4 (Archived Standard): Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  1. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  2. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede).
  3. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
  4. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
LAFS.8.L.3.5 (Archived Standard): Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  1. Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.
  2. Use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words.
  3. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., bullheaded, willful, firm, persistent, resolute).
LAFS.8.L.3.6 (Archived Standard): Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
LAFS.8.RI.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
LAFS.8.RI.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.8.RI.1.3 (Archived Standard): Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).
LAFS.8.RI.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.
LAFS.8.RI.2.5 (Archived Standard): Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept.
LAFS.8.RI.2.6 (Archived Standard): Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
LAFS.8.RI.3.8 (Archived Standard): Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced.
LAFS.8.RI.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.8.RL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
LAFS.8.RL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.8.RL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
LAFS.8.RL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.
LAFS.8.RL.2.5 (Archived Standard): Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.
LAFS.8.RL.2.6 (Archived Standard): Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.
LAFS.8.RL.3.9 (Archived Standard): Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.
LAFS.8.RL.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.8.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
  2. Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
  3. Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas.
  4. Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented.
LAFS.8.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation.
LAFS.8.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced.
LAFS.8.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
LAFS.8.SL.2.5 (Archived Standard): Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest.
LAFS.8.SL.2.6 (Archived Standard): Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
LAFS.8.W.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  1. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
  2. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
LAFS.8.W.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
  1. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
  3. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
LAFS.8.W.2.4 (Archived Standard): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
LAFS.8.W.2.6 (Archived Standard): Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
LAFS.8.W.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
LAFS.8.W.3.9 (Archived Standard): Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  1. Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new”).
  2. Apply grade 8 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced”).
LAFS.8.W.4.10 (Archived Standard): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
SS.6.G.2.4: Explain how the geographical location of ancient civilizations contributed to the culture and politics of those societies.
Clarifications:
Examples are Egypt, Rome, Greece, China, Kush.
SS.6.G.2.6: Explain the concept of cultural diffusion, and identify the influences of different ancient cultures on one another.
Clarifications:
Examples are Phoenicia on Greece and Greece on Rome.
SS.6.G.4.1: Explain how family and ethnic relationships influenced ancient cultures.
SS.6.W.1.1: Use timelines to identify chronological order of historical events.
SS.6.W.1.3: Interpret primary and secondary sources.
Clarifications:
Examples are artifacts, images, auditory sources, written sources.
SS.6.W.1.5: Describe the roles of historians and recognize varying historical interpretations (historiography).
SS.6.W.1.6: Describe how history transmits culture and heritage and provides models of human character.
SS.6.W.4.7: Explain the basic teachings of Laozi, Confucius, and Han Fei Zi.
Clarifications:
Examples are filial piety, the role of kinship in maintaining order, hierarchy in Chinese society.
SS.7.C.3.1: Compare different forms of government (direct democracy, representative democracy, socialism, communism, monarchy, oligarchy, autocracy).
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 50. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.7.C.3.10: Identify sources and types (civil, criminal, constitutional, military) of law.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the Civics End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the Civics End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 62. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.8.A.1.1: Provide supporting details for an answer from text, interview for oral history, check validity of information from research/text, and identify strong vs. weak arguments.
Clarifications:
Students should be encouraged to utilize FINDS (Focus, Investigage, Note, Develop, Score), Florida's research process model accessible at:  http://www.fldoe.org/bii/library_media/pdf/12totalfinds.pdf.
SS.8.A.1.4: Differentiate fact from opinion, utilize appropriate historical research and fiction/nonfiction support materials.
SS.8.A.1.7: View historic events through the eyes of those who were there as shown in their art, writings, music, and artifacts.
ELD.K12.ELL.LA.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
MAFS.K12.MP.1.1 (Archived Standard):

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1 (Archived Standard):

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.6.1 (Archived Standard):

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

WL.K12.IM.6.1: Distinguish patterns of behavior and social interaction in various settings in the target culture(s).
WL.K12.IM.6.3: Research contributions made by individuals from the target culture through the arts such as visual arts, architecture, music, dance, literature, etc.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

This course is intended to create opportunities for students to read, write, and speak beyond the Reading and Language Arts classroom settings.  Students will read independently and examine complex texts to increase critical thinking and critical reading skills.  The content of Literacy through Philosophy will include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • Exploring major philosophical ideas.
  • Extensive reading of, writing in response to, and discussing writings of great philosophers.
  • Analyzing the effects that philosophers have had on their cultures and on our modern culture.
  • Extensive readings of modern literature, and through discussion and writing, identifying and analyzing philosophical themes.
  • Evaluating how major philosophical ideas have affected their lives.
  • Critically think about and discuss how major philosophical ideas may affect their lives in the future.

English Language Development (ELD) Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.   For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf.


General Information

Course Number: 1010020 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 6 to 8 Education Courses > Subject: English/Language Arts > SubSubject: Literacy >
Abbreviated Title: M/J LITERACY PHILOS
Course Attributes:
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 8



Educator Certifications

English (Grades 6-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9) Plus Reading Endorsement
Social Science (Grades 5-9) Plus Middle Grades English (Middle Grades 5-9) Plus Reading Endorsement
Middle Grades English (Middle Grades 5-9) Plus Reading Endorsement Plus Social Science (Grades 6-12)
Reading (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Reading (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 6-12)


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