Solar Energy 2 Honors (#2002550) 


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org
You are not viewing the current course, please click the current year’s tab.

Course Standards

Integrate Standards for Mathematical Practice (MP) as applicable.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.1.1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.2.1 Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.3.1 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.4.1 Model with mathematics.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.5.1 Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.6.1 Attend to precision.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.7.1 Look for and make use of structure.
  • MAFS.K12.MP.8.1 Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Career and Technical Education: Solar Energy Technician

19.01 Define basic solar terms (e.g., irradiation, Langley, azimuth)
19.05 Describe angular effects on the irradiance of array
19.06 Identify factors that reduce/enhance solar irradiation
19.07 Determine average solar irradiation on various surfaces
19.08 Describe how a photovoltaic solar cell works
19.09 Draw and label a diagram of PV cells
19.10 Explain the differences between monocrystalline, polycrystalline, thin-film, and nano-solar cells
20.02 Identify personal and environmental safety hazards and accetable practices
21.08 Estimate the peak load and average energy use in order to determine the size and amount of solar equipment needed
22.05 Select appropriate conductor types and rating for each electrical circuit in the open or closed system
22.09 Determine voltage drop for any electrical circuit based on size and length of conductors
29.01 Discuss the role of creativity in constructing scientific questions, methods, and explanations.
29.02 Formulate scientifically investigatable questions, construct investigations, college and evaluate data, and develop scientific recommendations based on findings.
31.04 Conduct technical research to gather information necessary for decision-making
Name Description
SC.912.E.5.4: Explain the physical properties of the Sun and its dynamic nature and connect them to conditions and events on Earth.
SC.912.E.6.6: Analyze past, present, and potential future consequences to the environment resulting from various energy production technologies.
SC.912.E.7.1: Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.
SC.912.L.17.11: Evaluate the costs and benefits of renewable and nonrenewable resources, such as water, energy, fossil fuels, wildlife, and forests.
SC.912.L.17.13: Discuss the need for adequate monitoring of environmental parameters when making policy decisions.
SC.912.L.17.15: Discuss the effects of technology on environmental quality.
SC.912.L.17.16: Discuss the large-scale environmental impacts resulting from human activity, including waste spills, oil spills, runoff, greenhouse gases, ozone depletion, and surface and groundwater pollution.
SC.912.L.17.17: Assess the effectiveness of innovative methods of protecting the environment.
SC.912.L.17.18: Describe how human population size and resource use relate to environmental quality.
SC.912.L.17.20: Predict the impact of individuals on environmental systems and examine how human lifestyles affect sustainability.
SC.912.N.1.1: Define a problem based on a specific  body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following: 
  1. Pose questions about the natural world, (Articulate the purpose of the investigation and identify the relevant scientific concepts).
  2. Conduct systematic observations, (Write procedures that are clear and replicable. Identify observables and examine relationships between test (independent) variable and outcome (dependent) variable. Employ appropriate methods for accurate and consistent observations; conduct and record measurements at appropriate levels of precision. Follow safety guidelines).
  3. Examine books and other sources of information to see what is already known,
  4. Review what is known in light of empirical evidence, (Examine whether available empirical evidence can be interpreted in terms of existing knowledge and models, and if not, modify or develop new models).
  5. Plan investigations, (Design and evaluate a scientific investigation).
  6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs), (Collect data or evidence in an organized way. Properly use instruments, equipment, and materials (e.g., scales, probeware, meter sticks, microscopes, computers) including set-up, calibration, technique, maintenance, and storage).
  7. Pose answers, explanations, or descriptions of events,
  8. Generate explanations that explicate or describe natural phenomena (inferences),
  9. Use appropriate evidence and reasoning to justify these explanations to others,
  10. Communicate results of scientific investigations, and
  11. Evaluate the merits of the explanations produced by others.
SC.912.N.1.2: Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.
SC.912.N.1.3: Recognize that the strength or usefulness of a scientific claim is evaluated through scientific argumentation, which depends on  critical and logical thinking, and the active consideration of alternative scientific explanations to explain the data presented.
SC.912.N.1.4: Identify sources of information and assess their reliability according to the strict standards of scientific investigation.
SC.912.N.1.5: Describe and provide examples of how similar investigations conducted in many parts of the world result in the same outcome.
SC.912.N.1.6: Describe how scientific inferences are drawn from scientific observations and provide examples from the content being studied.
SC.912.N.1.7: Recognize the role of creativity in constructing scientific questions, methods and explanations.
SC.912.N.2.1: Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).
SC.912.N.2.2: Identify which questions can be answered through science and which questions are outside the boundaries of scientific investigation, such as questions addressed by other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, and religion.
SC.912.N.2.3: Identify examples of pseudoscience (such as astrology, phrenology) in society.
SC.912.N.2.4: Explain that scientific knowledge is both durable and robust and open to change. Scientific knowledge can change because it is often examined and re-examined by new investigations and scientific argumentation. Because of these frequent examinations, scientific knowledge becomes stronger, leading to its durability.
SC.912.N.2.5: Describe instances in which scientists' varied backgrounds, talents, interests, and goals influence the inferences and thus the explanations that they make about observations of natural phenomena and describe that competing interpretations (explanations) of scientists are a strength of science as they are a source of new, testable ideas that have the potential to add new evidence to support one or another of the explanations.
SC.912.N.3.1: Explain that a scientific theory is the culmination of many scientific investigations drawing together all the current evidence concerning a substantial range of phenomena; thus, a scientific theory represents the most powerful explanation scientists have to offer.
SC.912.N.3.5: Describe the function of models in science, and identify the wide range of models used in science.
SC.912.N.4.1: Explain how scientific knowledge and reasoning provide an empirically-based perspective to inform society's decision making.
SC.912.N.4.2: Weigh the merits of alternative strategies for solving a specific societal problem by comparing a number of different costs and benefits, such as human, economic, and environmental.
SC.912.P.8.12: Describe the properties of the carbon atom that make the diversity of carbon compounds possible.
SC.912.P.10.1: Differentiate among the various forms of energy and recognize that they can be transformed from one form to others.
SC.912.P.10.2: Explore the Law of Conservation of Energy by differentiating among open, closed, and isolated systems and explain that the total energy in an isolated system is a conserved quantity.
SC.912.P.10.3: Compare and contrast work and power qualitatively and quantitatively.
SC.912.P.10.4: Describe heat as the energy transferred by convection, conduction, and radiation, and explain the connection of heat to change in temperature or states of matter.
SC.912.P.10.5: Relate temperature to the average molecular kinetic energy.
SC.912.P.10.8: Explain entropy's role in determining the efficiency of processes that convert energy to work.
SC.912.P.10.14: Differentiate among conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.
LAFS.1112.RST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.
LAFS.1112.RST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.
LAFS.1112.RST.1.3 (Archived Standard): Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.
LAFS.1112.RST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.
LAFS.1112.RST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Analyze how the text structures information or ideas into categories or hierarchies, demonstrating understanding of the information or ideas.
LAFS.1112.RST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, identifying important issues that remain unresolved.
LAFS.1112.RST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
LAFS.1112.RST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.
LAFS.1112.RST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.
LAFS.1112.RST.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 11–12 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
LAFS.1112.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
LAFS.1112.SL.2.5 (Archived Standard): Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
LAFS.1112.WHST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
LAFS.1112.WHST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.1112.WHST.4.10 (Archived Standard): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
LAFS.910.RST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.
LAFS.910.RST.1.3 (Archived Standard): Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks, attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.
LAFS.910.RST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force, energy).
LAFS.910.RST.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.910.WHST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
LAFS.910.WHST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
ELD.K12.ELL.SC.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
MAFS.912.F-IF.3.7 (Archived Standard): Graph functions expressed symbolically and show key features of the graph, by hand in simple cases and using technology for more complicated cases.

  1. Graph linear and quadratic functions and show intercepts, maxima, and minima.
  2. Graph square root, cube root, and piecewise-defined functions, including step functions and absolute value functions.
  3. Graph polynomial functions, identifying zeros when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior. 
  4. Graph rational functions, identifying zeros and asymptotes when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior. 
  5. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions, showing intercepts and end behavior, and trigonometric functions, showing period, midline, and amplitude, and using phase shift.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.3 (Archived Standard): Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.
SS.912.W.9.1: Identify major scientific figures and breakthroughs of the 20th century, and assess their impact on contemporary life.
Clarifications:
Examples are Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, Sigmund Freud, Wright Brothers, Charles R. Drew, mass vaccination, atomic energy, transistor, microchip, space exploration, Internet, discovery of DNA, Human Genome Project.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to educate students more specifically on the generation of heat from solar energy. Building on concepts from Solar Energy Honors, this course will focus largely on fluid mechanics and heat transfer in solar thermal systems (pool, space, and water heating), especially types of collectors, properties of suitable materials for collectors, open and closed loop systems, and types of heat storage. The course covers scientific, economic, and global impact analysis of current energy methods and new solar energy technologies for the generation of energy from heat, as well as careers in various areas of solar energy. Students will be guided through the process of certification for a solar energy technician.


Special Notes: 
Instructional Practices
 
Teaching from a range of complex text is optimized when teachers in all subject areas implement the following strategies on a routine basis: 

  1. Ensuring wide reading from complex text that varies in length.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Emphasizing text-specific complex questions, and cognitively complex tasks, reinforce focus on the text and cultivate independence.
  4. Emphasizing students supporting answers based upon evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).


Science and Engineering Practices
 (NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education, 2010)

  • Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering).
  • Developing and using models.
  • Planning and carrying out investigations.
  • Analyzing and interpreting data.
  • Using mathematics, information and computer technology, and computational thinking.
  • Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering).
  • Engaging in argument from evidence.
  • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

GENERAL NOTES

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work. Through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted, students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Science. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/sc.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 2002550 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Science > SubSubject: Integrated Sciences >
Abbreviated Title: SOLAR ENERGY 2 HON
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
  • Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 3
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12



Educator Certifications

Earth/Space Science (Grades 6-12)
Physics (Grades 6-12)
Biology (Grades 6-12)
Chemistry (Grades 6-12)


There are more than 981 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/13122