Access M/J Comprehensive Science 1 (#7820015) 

{ M/J Comprehensive Science 1 - 2002040 }


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org
You are not viewing the current course, please click the current year’s tab.

Course Standards

Name Description
SC.6.E.6.1: Describe and give examples of ways in which Earth's surface is built up and torn down by physical and chemical weathering, erosion, and deposition.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.6.In.1: Describe how weathering and erosion reshape the Earth’s surface.
SC.6.E.6.Su.1: Recognize that wind and water cause physical weathering and erosion.
SC.6.E.6.Pa.1: Recognize that water can move soil.

SC.6.E.6.2: Recognize that there are a variety of different landforms on Earth's surface such as coastlines, dunes, rivers, mountains, glaciers, deltas, and lakes and relate these landforms as they apply to Florida.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.6.In.2: Identify various landforms in Florida, including coastlines, rivers, lakes, and dunes.
SC.6.E.6.Su.2: Recognize different landforms in Florida, including beaches (coastlines), rivers, and lakes.
SC.6.E.6.Pa.2: Recognize a landform in Florida, such as a beach (coastline), river, or lake.

SC.6.E.7.1: Differentiate among radiation, conduction, and convection, the three mechanisms by which heat is transferred through Earth's system.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.1: Recognize that heat is a flow of energy that moves through Earth’s land, air, and water in different ways, including conduction, convection, and radiation.
SC.6.E.7.Su.1: Recognize that heat can transfer from the Sun to the water, land, and air. Recognize that heat can transfer from the Sun to the water, land, and air.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.1: Recognize that the Sun is a source of heat.

SC.6.E.7.2: Investigate and apply how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere has an effect on weather patterns and climate.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.2: Identify components in the water cycle, including evaporation, condensation, precipitation, ground water, and runoff.
SC.6.E.7.Su.2: Recognize parts of the water cycle such as clouds (condensation), rain (precipitation), and evaporation.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.2: Recognize that rain comes from clouds.

SC.6.E.7.3: Describe how global patterns such as the jet stream and ocean currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, air pressure, wind direction and speed, and humidity and precipitation.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.3: Identify the way elements of weather are measured, including temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation.
SC.6.E.7.Su.3: Recognize the way temperature and wind speed are measured.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.3: Recognize different types of weather conditions, including hot/cold, raining/not raining, and windy/calm.

SC.6.E.7.4: Differentiate and show interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.4: Recognize that Earth consists of different parts, including air that is over the Earth (atmosphere), water that covers much of the Earth (hydrosphere), and the parts that support all living things on Earth (biosphere).
SC.6.E.7.Su.4: Recognize where living things are found (biosphere) and where the air is found (atmosphere) on Earth.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.4: Recognize that air covers Earth (atmosphere).

SC.6.E.7.5: Explain how energy provided by the sun influences global patterns of atmospheric movement and the temperature differences between air, water, and land.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.5: Recognize that there are general patterns of weather that move around Earth, and in North America the patterns typically move from west to east.
SC.6.E.7.Su.5: Recognize that there are patterns of weather that move.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.3: Recognize different types of weather conditions, including hot/cold, raining/not raining, and windy/calm.

SC.6.E.7.6: Differentiate between weather and climate.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.6: Identify climate as the expected weather patterns in a region.
SC.6.E.7.Su.6: Identify the major characteristics of climate in Florida, including temperature and precipitation.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.3: Recognize different types of weather conditions, including hot/cold, raining/not raining, and windy/calm.

SC.6.E.7.7: Investigate how natural disasters have affected human life in Florida.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.7: Identify possible effects of hurricanes and other natural disasters on humans in Florida.
SC.6.E.7.Su.7: Recognize possible effects of severe storms, hurricanes, or other natural disasters in Florida.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.5: Recognize where to go in severe weather situations or drills at school and at home.

SC.6.E.7.8: Describe ways human beings protect themselves from hazardous weather and sun exposure.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.8: Identify ways humans get ready for severe storms and protect themselves from sun exposure.
SC.6.E.7.Su.8: Recognize ways people prepare for severe storms and protect themselves from sun exposure.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.5: Recognize where to go in severe weather situations or drills at school and at home.

SC.6.E.7.9: Describe how the composition and structure of the atmosphere protects life and insulates the planet.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.E.7.In.9: Identify that the atmosphere protects Earth from radiation from the Sun and regulates the temperature.
SC.6.E.7.Su.9: Recognize that the air that surrounds Earth (atmosphere) protects living things from the intense heat of the Sun.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.4: Recognize that air covers Earth (atmosphere).

SC.6.L.14.1: Describe and identify patterns in the hierarchical organization of organisms from atoms to molecules and cells to tissues to organs to organ systems to organisms.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.L.14.In.1: Identify how the major structures of plants and organs of animals work as parts of larger systems, such as the heart is part of the circulatory system that pumps blood.
SC.6.L.14.Su.1: Identify the major internal organs of animals and external structures of plants and their functions.
SC.6.L.14.Pa.1: Recognize that the human body is made up of various parts.

SC.6.L.14.2: Investigate and explain the components of the scientific theory of cells (cell theory): all organisms are composed of cells (single-celled or multi-cellular), all cells come from pre-existing cells, and cells are the basic unit of life.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.L.14.In.2: Identify that the cell is the smallest basic unit of life and most living things are composed of many cells.
SC.6.L.14.Su.2: Recognize that there are smaller parts in all living things, too small to be seen without magnification, called cells.
SC.6.L.14.Pa.2: Recognize that the human body is made up of various parts.

SC.6.L.14.3: Recognize and explore how cells of all organisms undergo similar processes to maintain homeostasis, including extracting energy from food, getting rid of waste, and reproducing.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.L.14.In.3: Identify that cells carry out important functions within an organism, such as using energy from food.
SC.6.L.14.Su.3: Recognize that animals, including humans, use energy from food.
SC.6.L.14.Pa.3: Identify basic needs of plants and animals.

SC.6.L.14.4: Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.L.14.In.4: Recognize that plant and animal cells have different parts and each part has a function.
SC.6.L.14.Su.2: Recognize that there are smaller parts in all living things, too small to be seen without magnification, called cells.
SC.6.L.14.Pa.3: Identify basic needs of plants and animals.

SC.6.L.14.5: Identify and investigate the general functions of the major systems of the human body (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, excretory, immune, nervous, and musculoskeletal) and describe ways these systems interact with each other to maintain homeostasis.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.L.14.In.1: Identify how the major structures of plants and organs of animals work as parts of larger systems, such as the heart is part of the circulatory system that pumps blood.
SC.6.L.14.Su.1: Identify the major internal organs of animals and external structures of plants and their functions.
SC.6.L.14.Pa.4: Recognize body parts related to basic needs, such as mouth for eating.

SC.6.L.14.6: Compare and contrast types of infectious agents that may infect the human body, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.L.14.In.5: Recognize that bacteria and viruses can infect the human body.
SC.6.L.14.Su.4: Identify ways to prevent infection from bacteria and viruses, such as hand washing.
SC.6.L.14.Pa.5: Recognize practices that keep the body free from infection, such as hand washing.

SC.6.L.15.1: Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.L.15.In.1: Classify animals into major groups, such as insects, fish, reptiles, mammals, and birds.
SC.6.L.15.Su.1: Sort common animals by their physical characteristics.
SC.6.L.15.Pa.1: Match animals based on a given shared characteristic.

SC.6.N.1.1: Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use reference materials to gather information, carry out an experiment, collect and record data, and report results.
SC.6.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use materials to gather information, carry out a simple experiment, and record and share results.
SC.6.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to the sixth grade curriculum, observe and explore objects or activities, and recognize a solution.

SC.6.N.1.2: Explain why scientific investigations should be replicable.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.1.In.2: Identify that scientific investigations can be repeated the same way by others.
SC.6.N.1.Su.2: Recognize that experiments involve procedures that can be repeated the same way by others.
SC.6.N.1.Pa.2: Recognize that when a common activity is repeated, it has the same result.

SC.6.N.1.3: Explain the difference between an experiment and other types of scientific investigation, and explain the relative benefits and limitations of each.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.1.In.3: Identify that scientists can use different kinds of experiments, methods, and explanations to find answers to scientific questions.
SC.6.N.1.Su.3: Recognize that scientists perform experiments, make observations, and gather evidence to answer scientific questions.
SC.6.N.1.Pa.3: Recognize that people conduct activities and share information about science.

SC.6.N.1.4: Discuss, compare, and negotiate methods used, results obtained, and explanations among groups of students conducting the same investigation.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.1.In.3: Identify that scientists can use different kinds of experiments, methods, and explanations to find answers to scientific questions.
SC.6.N.1.Su.3: Recognize that scientists perform experiments, make observations, and gather evidence to answer scientific questions.
SC.6.N.1.Pa.3: Recognize that people conduct activities and share information about science.

SC.6.N.1.5: Recognize that science involves creativity, not just in designing experiments, but also in creating explanations that fit evidence.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.1.In.4: Compare results of observations and experiments of self and others.
SC.6.N.1.Su.4: Identify information based on observations and experiments of self and others.
SC.6.N.1.Pa.3: Recognize that people conduct activities and share information about science.

SC.6.N.2.1: Distinguish science from other activities involving thought.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.2.In.1: Identify familiar topics included in the study of science.
SC.6.N.2.Su.1: Recognize familiar topics in the study of science.
SC.6.N.2.Pa.1: Recognize objects and pictures related to science.

SC.6.N.2.2: Explain that scientific knowledge is durable because it is open to change as new evidence or interpretations are encountered.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.2.In.2: Identify that scientific knowledge changes with new evidence or new interpretations.
SC.6.N.2.Su.2: Recognize that scientific knowledge changes when new things are discovered.
SC.6.N.2.Pa.1: Recognize objects and pictures related to science.

SC.6.N.2.3: Recognize that scientists who make contributions to scientific knowledge come from all kinds of backgrounds and possess varied talents, interests, and goals.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.1.In.3: Identify that scientists can use different kinds of experiments, methods, and explanations to find answers to scientific questions.
SC.6.N.2.Su.3: Recognize contributions of well-known scientists.
SC.6.N.2.Pa.2: Recognize a scientist as a person who works with science.

SC.6.N.3.1: Recognize and explain that a scientific theory is a well-supported and widely accepted explanation of nature and is not simply a claim posed by an individual.   Thus, the use of the term theory in science is very different than how it is used in everyday life.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.3.In.1: Identify that a scientific theory is an explanation of nature supported by evidence.
SC.6.N.3.Su.1: Recognize that a scientific theory is an explanation of nature.
SC.6.N.3.Pa.1: Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic.

SC.6.N.3.2: Recognize and explain that a scientific law is a description of a specific relationship under given conditions in the natural world. Thus, scientific laws are different from societal laws.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.3.In.2: Identify examples of scientific laws (proven descriptions of nature), such as the law of gravity.
SC.6.N.3.Su.2: Recognize events that are based on scientific laws, such as the law of gravity.
SC.6.N.3.Pa.1: Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic.

SC.6.N.3.3: Give several examples of scientific laws.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.3.In.2: Identify examples of scientific laws (proven descriptions of nature), such as the law of gravity.
SC.6.N.3.Su.2: Recognize events that are based on scientific laws, such as the law of gravity.
SC.6.N.3.Pa.1: Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic.

SC.6.N.3.4: Identify the role of models in the context of the sixth grade science benchmarks.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.N.3.In.3: Identify models used in the context of sixth grade science access points.
SC.6.N.3.Su.3: Recognize models used in the context of sixth grade science access points.
SC.6.N.3.Pa.2: Associate a model with an activity used in the context of sixth grade science access points.

SC.6.P.11.1: Explore the Law of Conservation of Energy by differentiating between potential and kinetic energy. Identify situations where kinetic energy is transformed into potential energy and vice versa.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.P.11.In.1: Identify energy as stored (potential) or expressed in motion (kinetic).
SC.6.P.11.Su.1: Recognize examples of stored energy, such as in a roller coaster.
SC.6.P.11.Pa.1: Distinguish between objects in motion (kinetic energy) and at rest.

SC.6.P.12.1: Measure and graph distance versus time for an object moving at a constant speed. Interpret this relationship.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.P.12.In.1: Identify that speed describes the distance and time in which an object is moving, such as miles per hour.
SC.6.P.12.Su.1: Recognize that speed describes how far an object travels in a given amount of time.
SC.6.P.12.Pa.1: Recognize that traveling longer distances takes more time, such as going to the cafeteria takes longer than going across the classroom.

SC.6.P.13.1: Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.P.13.In.1: Identify examples of gravitational and contact forces, such as falling objects or push and pull.
SC.6.P.13.Su.1: Distinguish between pushing and pulling forces (contact) and falling (gravitational force) of an object.
SC.6.P.13.Pa.1: Recognize that pushing or pulling makes an object move (contact force).

SC.6.P.13.2: Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.P.13.In.1: Identify examples of gravitational and contact forces, such as falling objects or push and pull.
SC.6.P.13.Su.1: Distinguish between pushing and pulling forces (contact) and falling (gravitational force) of an object.
SC.6.P.13.Pa.1: Recognize that pushing or pulling makes an object move (contact force).
SC.6.P.13.Pa.2: Recognize that objects fall unless supported by something.

SC.6.P.13.3: Investigate and describe that an unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed, or direction of motion, or both.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SC.6.P.13.In.2: Demonstrate and describe how forces can change the speed and direction of objects in motion.
SC.6.P.13.Su.2: Recognize that force can change the speed and direction of an object in motion.
SC.6.P.13.Pa.3: Recognize the speed (fast or slow) of a moving object.

LAFS.6.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
  2. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
  3. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.
  4. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.1a: Make appropriate comments that contribute to a collaborative discussion.
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.1b: Review the key ideas expressed within a collaborative discussion.

LAFS.6.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.2a: Explain information learned from various mediums.
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.2b: Explain how information gained via media and formats contributes to the understanding of a topic, text or issue under study.

LAFS.6.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.3a: Summarize the points a speaker makes.
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.3b: Summarize the points an author makes.
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.3c: Distinguish claims or arguments that are supported by evidence from those that are not.
LAFS.6.SL.1.AP.3d: Distinguish claims presented orally or in writing that are supported by reasons and claims that are not.

LAFS.6.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.6.SL.2.AP.4a: Report on a topic, story or claim with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details

LAFS.6.SL.2.5 (Archived Standard): Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.6.SL.2.AP.5a: Use captioned pictures, labeled diagrams, tables or other visual displays in presentations when appropriate to support the topic or theme.
LAFS.6.SL.2.AP.5b: Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information.

LAFS.68.RST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.
LAFS.68.RST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
LAFS.68.RST.1.3 (Archived Standard): Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
LAFS.68.RST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.
LAFS.68.RST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to an understanding of the topic.
LAFS.68.RST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text.
LAFS.68.RST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
LAFS.68.RST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a text.
LAFS.68.RST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic.
LAFS.68.WHST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce claim(s) about a topic or issue, acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
  2. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text, using credible sources.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
LAFS.68.WHST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
  3. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
LAFS.68.WHST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.68.WHST.2.5 (Archived Standard): With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.
LAFS.68.WHST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently.
LAFS.68.WHST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
LAFS.68.WHST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.68.WHST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and research.
LAFS.68.WHST.4.10 (Archived Standard): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
MAFS.6.EE.3.9 (Archived Standard): Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable. Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation. For example, in a problem involving motion at constant speed, list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and write the equation d = 65t to represent the relationship between distance and time.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.6.EE.3.AP.9a: Write an equation using variables to represent two quantities where one variable represents the dependent variable and the second represents the independent variable.
MAFS.6.EE.3.AP.9b: Write an expression that illustrates the relationship between two variables from a provided table.

MAFS.6.SP.2.4 (Archived Standard): Display numerical data in plots on a number line, including dot plots, histograms, and box plots.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.6.SP.2.AP.4a: Display data on a line plot, such as dot plots, histograms or box plots.

MAFS.6.SP.2.5 (Archived Standard): Summarize numerical data sets in relation to their context, such as by:
  1. Reporting the number of observations.
  2. Describing the nature of the attribute under investigation, including how it was measured and its units of measurement.
  3. Giving quantitative measures of center (median and/or mean) and variability (interquartile range and/or mean absolute deviation), as well as describing any overall pattern and any striking deviations from the overall pattern with reference to the context in which the data were gathered.
  4. Relating the choice of measures of center and variability to the shape of the data distribution and the context in which the data were gathered.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.6.SP.2.AP.5a: Collect real-world data by surveying.
MAFS.6.SP.2.AP.5b: Plot the data.
MAFS.6.SP.2.AP.5c: Define the mean, mode, and range of the data.

ELD.K12.ELL.SC.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
HE.6.C.1.3: Identify environmental factors that affect personal health.
Clarifications:
Air and water quality, availability of sidewalks, contaminated food, and road hazards.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.6.C.1.In.c: Recognize environmental factors that affect personal health, such as air quality, availability of sidewalks, or spoiled food.
HE.6.C.1.Su.c: Recognize an environmental factor that affects personal health, such as air quality, availability of sidewalks, or spoiled food.
HE.6.C.1.Pa.c: Recognize a factor in the school environment that promotes personal health, such as having adequate lighting or a clean environment.

HE.6.C.1.5: Explain how body systems are impacted by hereditary factors and infectious agents.
Clarifications:
Cystic fibrosis affects respiratory and a digestive system, sickle-cell anemia affects the circulatory system, and influenza affects the respiratory system.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.6.C.1.In.e: Identify likely injuries or illnesses resulting from engaging in unhealthy/risky behaviors, such as obesity related to poor nutrition and inactivity, cancer and chronic lung disease related to tobacco use, injuries caused from failure to use seat restraint, and sexually transmitted diseases.
HE.6.C.1.Su.e: Recognize likely injuries or illnesses resulting from engaging in an unhealthy behavior, such as obesity related to poor nutrition and inactivity, cancer and chronic lung disease related to tobacco use, injuries caused from failure to use seat restraint, and sexually transmitted diseases.
HE.6.C.1.Pa.e: Recognize a likely injury or illness from engaging in an unhealthy behavior, such as obesity related to poor nutrition and inactivity or injuries caused from failure to use seat restraint.




General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Science.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/sc.pdf.

 

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection is provided by the Florida Association of School Administrators: http://www.fasa.net/4DCGI/cms/review.html?Action=CMS_Document&DocID=139. Please be aware that these resources have not been reviewed by CPALMS and there may be a charge for the use of some of them in this collection.


General Information

Course Number: 7820015 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Middle/Junior High > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS M/J COMPSCI 1
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 6,7,8



Educator Certifications

Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Chemistry (Grades 6-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Biology (Grades 6-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Physics (Grades 6-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Earth/Space Science (Grades 6-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Chemistry (Grades 6-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Biology (Grades 6-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Physics (Grades 6-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Earth/Space Science (Grades 6-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Chemistry (Grades 6-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Biology (Grades 6-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Physics (Grades 6-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Earth/Space Science (Grades 6-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Chemistry (Grades 6-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Biology (Grades 6-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Physics (Grades 6-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Earth/Space Science (Grades 6-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Chemistry (Grades 6-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Biology (Grades 6-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Physics (Grades 6-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Earth/Space Science (Grades 6-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


There are more than 984 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/15490