Creating Suspense Lesson 1: Analyzing Literary Devices in Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"

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Resource ID#: 35575 Primary Type: Lesson Plan

General Information

Subject(s): English Language Arts
Grade Level(s): 9, 10
Intended Audience: Educators educators
Suggested Technology: Document Camera, Computer for Presenter, LCD Projector, Overhead Projector
Instructional Time: 3 Hour(s)
Keywords: Poe, foreshadowing, imagery, similes, personification, characterization, suspense, mood, theme, "The Masque of the Red Death", symbolism
Instructional Design Framework(s): Direct Instruction

Aligned Standards

This vetted resource aligns to concepts or skills in these benchmarks.

1 Lesson Plan

Creating Suspense Lesson 2: Analyzing Literary Devices in "The Lottery"

In this lesson (part 2 of 2 in a unit), students will read and analyze literary devices in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery." Students will practice text-coding the story to note uses of characterization and references to tradition. Students will complete a handout where they will analyze how Jackson creates suspense through the use of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. Students will also compare/contrast a short (ten minute) film version of "The Lottery" to Jackson's story. Students will also participate in a Socratic Seminar covering topics such as Jackson's use of irony, tone, theme, and symbolism. For the summative assessment, students will write an essay comparing and contrasting Edgar Allan Poe's use of suspense with Jackson's, making a claim as to which author more successfully creates a suspenseful mood.

 

Related Resources

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Lesson Plan

Creating Suspense Lesson 2: Analyzing Literary Devices in "The Lottery":

In this lesson (part 2 of 2 in a unit), students will read and analyze literary devices in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery." Students will practice text-coding the story to note uses of characterization and references to tradition. Students will complete a handout where they will analyze how Jackson creates suspense through the use of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. Students will also compare/contrast a short (ten minute) film version of "The Lottery" to Jackson's story. Students will also participate in a Socratic Seminar covering topics such as Jackson's use of irony, tone, theme, and symbolism. For the summative assessment, students will write an essay comparing and contrasting Edgar Allan Poe's use of suspense with Jackson's, making a claim as to which author more successfully creates a suspenseful mood.

 

Type: Lesson Plan