Reviewed and Approved

Just Right Goldilocks’ Café: Turbidity

Resource ID#: 176008

Primary Type: Lesson Plan


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



This is lesson 2 of 3 in the Just Right Goldilocks’ Café unit. This lesson focuses on systematic investigation on getting a cup of coffee to be the “just right” level of turbidity. Students will use turbidity sensors and code using ScratchX during their investigation.

General Information

Subject(s): Science, Mathematics
Grade Level(s): 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Intended Audience: Educators
Suggested Technology: Computers for Students, Internet Connection, Probes for Data Collection
   
Instructional Time: 1 Hour(s) 45 Minute(s)
 
Keywords: code, coding, computer science, turbid, turibidity, sensor, probe, scratch, inequality
Instructional Component Type(s): Lesson Plan
Instructional Design Framework(s): Guided Inquiry (Level 3)



Aligned Standards

Name Description
SC.35.CS-CC.1.3: Identify ways that technology can foster teamwork, and collaboration can support problem solving and innovation.
SC.35.CS-CC.1.5: Explain that providing and receiving feedback from others can improve performance and outcomes for collaborative digital projects.
SC.35.CS-CP.2.2: Create, test, and modify a program in a graphical environment (e.g., block-based visual programming language), individually and collaboratively.
SC.35.CS-CP.2.3: Create a program using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.
SC.35.CS-CP.2.4: Explain that programs need known initial conditions (e.g., set initial score to zero in a game, initialize variables, or initial values set by hardware input).
SC.35.CS-CP.2.5: Detect and correct program errors, including those involving arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition, using interactive debugging.
SC.35.CS-CS.1.3: Answer a question, individually and collaboratively, using data from a simulation.
SC.35.CS-CS.2.2: Describe how computational thinking can be used to solve real life issues in science and engineering.
SC.35.CS-CS.2.6: Write an algorithm to solve a grade-level appropriate problem (e.g., move a character through a maze, instruct a character to draw a specific shape, have a character start, repeat or end activity as required or upon a specific event), individually or collaboratively.
SC.35.CS-CS.2.7: Identify and correct logical errors in algorithms; written, mapped, live action, or digital.
SC.35.CS-CS.2.8: Systematically test and identify logical errors in algorithms.
SC.4.E.6.5: Investigate how technology and tools help to extend the ability of humans to observe very small things and very large things.
SC.4.N.1.1: Raise questions about the natural world, use appropriate reference materials that support understanding to obtain information (identifying the source), conduct both individual and team investigations through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.
SC.4.N.1.2: Compare the observations made by different groups using multiple tools and seek reasons to explain the differences across groups.
SC.4.N.1.3: Explain that science does not always follow a rigidly defined method ("the scientific method") but that science does involve the use of observations and empirical evidence.
SC.4.N.1.5: Compare the methods and results of investigations done by other classmates.
SC.4.N.1.6: Keep records that describe observations made, carefully distinguishing actual observations from ideas and inferences about the observations.
SC.4.N.3.1: Explain that models can be three dimensional, two dimensional, an explanation in your mind, or a computer model.
SC.4.P.11.1: Recognize that heat flows from a hot object to a cold object and that heat flow may cause materials to change temperature.
SC.5.N.1.1: Define a problem, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigations of various types such as: systematic observations, experiments requiring the identification of variables, collecting and organizing data, interpreting data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
SC.5.N.1.3: Recognize and explain the need for repeated experimental trials.
SC.5.N.1.5: Recognize and explain that authentic scientific investigation frequently does not parallel the steps of "the scientific method."
SC.5.N.2.2: Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should be replicable by others.
SC.5.P.8.1: Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature.
SC.6.N.1.1: Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
SC.6.N.1.4: Discuss, compare, and negotiate methods used, results obtained, and explanations among groups of students conducting the same investigation.
SC.6.N.1.5: Recognize that science involves creativity, not just in designing experiments, but also in creating explanations that fit evidence.
SC.68.CS-CP.2.3: Develop problem solutions using a block programming language, including all of the following: looping behavior, conditional statements, expressions, variables, and functions.
SC.68.CS-CP.3.1: Select appropriate tools and technology resources to accomplish a variety of tasks and solve problems.
SC.68.CS-CS.1.3: Evaluate what kinds of real-world problems can be solved using modeling and simulation.
SC.68.CS-CS.2.2: Solve real-life issues in science and engineering (i.e., generalize a solution to open-ended problems) using computational thinking skills.
SC.68.CS-CS.2.6: Create a program that implements an algorithm to achieve a given goal, individually and collaboratively.
SC.68.CS-CS.2.7: Design solutions that use repetition and two-way selection (e.g., for, while, if/else).
SC.68.CS-CS.6.1: Explain why some tasks can be accomplished more easily by computers.
SC.68.CS-CS.6.3: Identify novel ways humans interact with computers, including software, probes, sensors, and handheld devices.
SC.7.N.1.1: Define a problem from the seventh grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
SC.7.N.1.3: Distinguish between an experiment (which must involve the identification and control of variables) and other forms of scientific investigation and explain that not all scientific knowledge is derived from experimentation.
SC.7.N.1.4: Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.
SC.7.N.3.2: Identify the benefits and limitations of the use of scientific models.
SC.7.P.11.1: Recognize that adding heat to or removing heat from a system may result in a temperature change and possibly a change of state.
SC.8.N.1.1: Define a problem from the eighth grade curriculum using appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigations of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
SC.8.N.1.2: Design and conduct a study using repeated trials and replication.
SC.8.N.3.1: Select models useful in relating the results of their own investigations.
MAFS.4.NBT.1.2: Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
MAFS.4.NBT.1.3: Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.
MAFS.6.EE.2.8: Write an inequality of the form x > c or x < c to represent a constraint or condition in a real-world or mathematical problem. Recognize that inequalities of the form x > c or x < c have infinitely many solutions; represent solutions of such inequalities on number line diagrams.
MAFS.7.EE.2.4: Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities.
  1. Solve word problems leading to equations of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Solve equations of these forms fluently. Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used in each approach. For example, the perimeter of a rectangle is 54 cm. Its length is 6 cm. What is its width?
  2. Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form px + q > r or px + q < r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Graph the solution set of the inequality and interpret it in the context of the problem. For example: As a salesperson, you are paid $50 per week plus $3 per sale. This week you want your pay to be at least $100. Write an inequality for the number of sales you need to make, and describe the solutions.

Clarifications:
Fluency Expectations or Examples of Culminating Standards

In solving word problems leading to one-variable equations of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r, students solve the equations fluently. This will require fluency with rational number arithmetic (7.NS.1.1–1.3), as well as fluency to some extent with applying properties operations to rewrite linear expressions with rational coefficients (7.EE.1.1).

Examples of Opportunities for In-Depth Focus

Work toward meeting this standard builds on the work that led to meeting 6.EE.2.7 and prepares students for the work that will lead to meeting 8.EE.3.7.