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Resource ID#: 156676

Primary Type: Tutorial


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1903-1927. Topics include the Wright Brothers, World War I, women's suffrage, Prohibition, jazz, Hollywood in the 1920s, and Charles Lindbergh. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources. Enjoy this journey into American history!

General Information

Subject(s): Social Studies
Grade Level(s): 11
Intended Audience: Students
Suggested Technology: Computers for Students, Internet Connection, Speakers/Headphones
   
Instructional Time: 30 Minute(s)
Resource supports reading in content area: Yes
Keywords: Grade 11, U.S. history, tutorial, Wright Brothers, American isolationism, World War I, trench warfare, No Man's Land, Lusitania, Wilson's War Message to Congress, Woodrow Wilson, Eddie Rickenbacker, Wilson's 14 Points, League of Nations, 19th Amendment, Alice Paul, W.E.B. DuBois, Roaring Twenties, Jazz Age, flapper, Prohibition, speakeasy, Louis Armstrong, Charles Lindbergh
Instructional Component Type(s): Tutorial Video/Audio/Animation Image/Photograph Text Resource
Resource Collection: Social Studies - U.S. History Existing Student Tutorials



Aligned Standards

Name Description
SS.912.A.4.5: Examine causes, course, and consequences of United States involvement in World War I.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, militarism, entangling alliances vs. neutrality, Zimmerman Note, the Lusitania, the Selective Service Act, the homefront, the American Expeditionary Force, Wilson's Fourteen Points, the Treaty of Versailles (and opposition to it), isolationism.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.4.7: Examine the impact of airplanes, battleships, new weaponry and chemical warfare in creating new war strategies (trench warfare, convoys).
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.10: Examine the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles and the failure of the United States to support the League of Nations.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, self-determination, boundaries, demilitarized zone, sanctions reparations, and the League of Nations (including Article X of the Covenant).

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.6: Analyze the influence that Hollywood, the Harlem Renaissance, the Fundamentalist movement, and prohibition had in changing American society in the 1920s.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.10: Analyze support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.