Reviewed and Approved

Deconstructing Reconstruction

Resource ID#: 155464

Primary Type: Student Tutorial


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



Learn about the successes and failures of Reconstruction, one of the most controversial periods of American history, in this interactive tutorial. After the rise of the Ku Klux Klan and "Redeemer" resistance, this remarkably progressive period ended with the Election of 1876.

Check out our other tutorials about the Reconstruction era:

Attachments

Accessible Version: Accessible verison of the tutorial content in pdf format.

General Information

Subject(s): Social Studies
Grade Level(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
Intended Audience: Students
   
Instructional Time: 30 Minute(s)
 
Keywords: Grade 11, U.S. History, tutorial, Reconstruction, Black Codes, Civil War, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, Election of 1876, Samuel Tilden, Rutherford B. Hayes, Ku Klux Klan, KKK, Redeemers, sharecropping, sharecroppers, Colfax Massacre, Freedmen, Freedmen’s Bureau, Republican Party, carpetbaggers, scalawags
Instructional Component Type(s): Original Student Tutorial
Resource Collection: Original Student Tutorials Social Studies - U.S. History - Grades 9-12



Aligned Standards

Name Description
SS.912.A.2.2: Assess the influence of significant people or groups on Reconstruction.
Clarifications:

Examples may include, but are not limited to, Alexander H. Stephens, Andrew Johnson, carpetbaggers, Charles Sumner, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frederick Douglass, Hiram Revels, Hiram Rhodes Revels, Jefferson Davis, Ku Klux Klan, Oliver O. Howard, Radical Republicans, Rutherford B. Hayes, scalawags, Thaddeus Stevens, Ulysses S. Grant, and William T. Sherman.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.2.3: Describe the issues that divided Republicans during the early Reconstruction era.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, southern whites, blacks, black legislators and white extremist organizations such as the KKK, Knights of the White Camellia, The White League, Red Shirts, and Pale Faces.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.2.4: Distinguish the freedoms guaranteed to African Americans and other groups with the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, abolition of slavery, citizenship, suffrage, equal protection.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.2.6: Compare the effects of the Black Codes and the Nadir on freed people, and analyze the sharecropping system and debt peonage as practiced in the United States.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.



Suggested Tutorials

Name Description
The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 2:

Learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the Nadir of American race relations, in this interactive tutorial.

Check out The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 1 here.

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 1:

Learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the Nadir of American race relations, in this interactive tutorial.

Check out The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 2 here.

Booker T. and W.E.B Part 2:

Learn about Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois and their rivalry of ideas in part 2 of this interactive tutorial. Both men were African American leaders during the "Nadir" of race relations, but their visions were very different.

After the War: Reconstruction Begins, Part 2:

Learn what happened after the guns of the Civil War fell silent, the beginning of the Reconstruction era, in this 2-part interactive tutorial. You'll learn about Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Radical Republicans, and the impeachment of a president!

After the War: Reconstruction Begins, Part 1 can be found here.

The related tutorial, Deconstructing Reconstruction can be found here.

After the War: Reconstruction Begins, Part 1:

Learn what happened after the guns of the Civil War fell silent, the beginning of the Reconstruction era, in this 2-part interactive tutorial. You'll learn about Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Radical Republicans, and the impeachment of a president!

After the War: Reconstruction Begins, Part 2 can be found here.

The related tutorial, Deconstructing Reconstruction can be found here.

Booker T. and W.E.B. Part 1:

Learn about Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois and their rivalry of ideas in part 1 of this interactive tutorial.  Both men were African American leaders during the "Nadir" of race relations, but their visions were very different.  

Click HERE to open part 2.

The Civil War's Legacy:

Learn how and why the Civil War came to an end, and what its consequences were for Americans in the North and South, as well as future generations.  In this interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the Constitution and how they form an important legacy of the war.