Reviewed and Approved

Crash Course U.S History: The Industrial Economy

Resource ID#: 154858

Primary Type: Tutorial


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind tour of America during the Industrial Revolution. After the Civil War, many changes in technology and ideas gave rise to a new industrialism. You'll learn about industry leaders of the time, such as Vanderbilt, Carnegie, Rockefeller, and Morgan. Enjoy this "crash course" review about trusts, combinations, and how the government responded to these new business practices!

General Information

Subject(s): Social Studies
Grade Level(s): 11
Intended Audience: Students
Suggested Technology: Computers for Students, Internet Connection, Speakers/Headphones
   
Instructional Time: 13 Minute(s)
 
Keywords: U.S. History, tutorial, Grade 11, Industrial Revolution, industry, farming, railroad, trusts, monopolies, Homestead Act, urbanization, Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D Rockefeller, JP Morgan, Andrew Carnegie, unions, Knights of Labor, AFL
Instructional Component Type(s): Tutorial Video/Audio/Animation
Resource Collection: Social Studies - U.S. History Existing Student Tutorials



Aligned Standards

Name Description
SS.912.A.3.2: Examine the social, political, and economic causes, course, and consequences of the second Industrial Revolution that began in the late 19th century.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.3.4: Determine how the development of steel, oil, transportation, communication, and business practices affected the United States economy.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, railroads, the telegraph, pools, holding companies, trusts, corporations, contributed to westward expansion, expansion of trade and development of new industries, vertical and horizontal integration.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.6: Analyze changes that occurred as the United States shifted from agrarian to an industrial society.
Clarifications:

Examples may include, but are not limited to, Social Darwinism, laissez-faire, government regulations of food and drugs, migration to cities, urbanization, changes to the family structure, Ellis Island, angel Island, push-pull factors.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.