Reviewed and Approved

Coming to America: The Era of Mass Immigration

Resource ID#: 151552

Primary Type: Student Tutorial


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



Learn about the era of mass immigration from 1865 to 1914, when as many as 25 million immigrants entered the United States, many of them through Ellis Island. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn where immigrants came from, why they emigrated, how they adjusted to life in the U.S., and compare the experiences of European and Asian immigrants.

Attachments

Accessible Version: Accessible version of the tutorial in PDF format.

General Information

Subject(s): Social Studies
Grade Level(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
Intended Audience: Students
   
Instructional Time: 30 Minute(s)
 
Keywords: tutorial, Grade 11, U.S. History, immigration, immigrant, quotas, Ellis Island, Angel Island, Immigration Act, emigrant, emigration, Statue of Liberty, political bosses, political machines, nativism, Social Darwinism, Chinese, Japanese, China, Japan, history, interactive, tutorials, elearning, e-learning
Instructional Component Type(s): Original Student Tutorial
Resource Collection: Original Student Tutorials Social Studies - U.S. History - Grades 9-12



Aligned Standards

Name Description
SS.912.A.1.4: Analyze how images, symbols, objects, cartoons, graphs, charts, maps, and artwork may be used to interpret the significance of time periods and events from the past.
SS.912.A.3.7: Compare the experience of European immigrants in the east to that of Asian immigrants in the west (the Chinese Exclusion Act, Gentlemen's Agreement with Japan).
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to nativism, integration of immigrants into society when comparing "Old" [before 1890] and "New" immigrants [after 1890], Immigration Act of 1924.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.11: Analyze the impact of political machines in United States cities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but aren ot limited to, Boss Tweed, Tammany Hall, George Washington Plunkitt, Washington Gladden, Thomas Nast.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.


Suggested Tutorials

Name Description
The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

Analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including minorities, during WWII.

War and Peace? (Part 2 of 2):

Experience the end of World War I and the Paris Peace Conference that followed, from the point of view of the United States and President Woodrow Wilson.  In part 2 of this two-part, interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about the Treaty of Versailles that ended the war with Germany, about the League of Nations, and about Wilson's failure to make the U.S. a part of the newly created international organization.  

Click below to open Part 1.

War and Peace? (Part 1)

War and Peace? (Part 1 of 2):

Learn about the end of World War I and the Paris Peace Conference that followed, from the point of view of the United States and President Woodrow Wilson. In part one of this two-part, interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about the Treaty of Versailles that ended the war with Germany, about the League of Nations, and about Wilson's failure to make the U.S. a part of the newly created international organization.  

Click below to open Part 2

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Learn how Americans on the home front experienced World War 1 while helping the U.S.A win the war.  In this 2-part interactive tutorial series, you'll learn about war bonds and the changes WWI brought to America's economy.  You'll also learn how propaganda and new laws against wartime dissent curbed Americans' civil liberties.  Finally, you'll learn how the war lead to increased opportunities for women and African Americans. 

Click below to open Part 1.

Check out the companion series, "Over There: Americans at War in World War I." Click below to open parts 1 and 2.

Over Here: Americans at Home in World War I (Part 1 of 2):

Learn how Americans on the home front experienced World War 1 while helping the U.S.A win the war.  In this 2-part interactive tutorial series, you'll learn about war bonds and the changes WWI brought to America's economy.  You'll also learn how propaganda and new laws against wartime dissent curbed Americans' civil liberties.  Finally, you'll learn how the war lead to increased opportunities for women and African Americans.  

Click below to open Part 2.

Check out the companion series, Over There: Americans at War in World War I. Click below to open parts 1 and 2.

World War II Begins (Part 2 of 2):

Learn how World War II began in Europe and Asia in Part 2 of this interactive tutorial.  You'll learn about the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan that threatened world peace, and you'll learn how the United States responded with isolationism...until the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 caused America to join the Allies.  

Click below to open Part 1.

World War II Begins (Part 1)

World War II Begins (Part 1 of 2):

Learn how World War II began in Europe and Asia in Part 1 of this interactive tutorial. You'll learn about the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan that threatened world peace, and you'll learn how the United States responded with isolationism...until the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 caused America to join the Allies.  

Click below to open Part 2.

World War II Begins (Part 2)

Captains of Industry: The Second Industrial Revolution:

Learn some of the differences between the First and Second Industrial Revolutions, as well as key developments that drove the Second Industrial Revolution with this interactive tutorial. You will also learn about some of the leaders of industry during this era, including John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and J.P. Morgan, and examine how their development of major industries and business practices affected America’s economy during the Second Industrial Revolution.

Check out the related tutorial: The Power of Innovation: Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Postwar Blues...and Reds:

Learn about the years immediately following World War I: 1919 and 1920 in this interactive tutorial.  These were dangerous years of economic depression, racial violence, and anti-immigrant nativism in the United States.  You'll learn about the Red Scare, the Palmer Raids, Sacco and Vanzetti, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan.