Standard #: LAFS.8.W.1.2


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
  1. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
  3. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.


Related Courses

Course Number1111 Course Title222
1000000: M/J Intensive Language Arts (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1001070: M/J Language Arts 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001080: M/J Language Arts 3 Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002020: M/J Language Arts 3 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002180: M/J English Language Development (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1007020: M/J Speech and Debate 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1100000: M/J Library Skills/Information Literacy (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700060: M/J Career Research and Decision Making (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7810013: Access M/J Language Arts 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1009050: M/J Writing 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1006020: M/J Journalism 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1010000: M/J Literacy through Film & Literature (Specifically in versions: 2016 and beyond (current))
1010010: M/J Literacy through World Literature (Specifically in versions: 2016 and beyond (current))
1010020: M/J Literacy through Philosophy (Specifically in versions: 2016 and beyond (current))
1400025: M/J Peers as Partners in Learning (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)


Related Access Points

Access Point Number Access Point Title
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2a Create an organizational structure for writing that groups information logically (e.g., cause/effect, compare/contrast, descriptions and examples) to support paragraph focus.
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2b Provide a clear introduction, previewing information to follow and summarizing stated focus.
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2c Develop the topic (e.g., add additional information related to the topic) with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations or other information and examples.
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2d Use transitional words, phrases and clauses that connect ideas and create cohesion within writing.
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2e Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2f Maintain a consistent style and voice throughout writing (e.g., third person for formal style, accurate and efficient word choice, sentence fluency, voice should be active versus passive).
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2g Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a coherent manner with relevant evidence.
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2h Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
LAFS.8.W.1.AP.2i Report on a topic with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details that support the main ideas.


Related Resources

Lesson Plans

Name Description
Gr. 8 Lesson 1-Sponging Off the Everglades

Students will be able to: 

  • Describe how social and economic needs for water affects the water in the Everglades ecosystem
  • Explain 3 ways that the Everglades are necessary for our daily lives
  • List 3 ways to conserve water
  • Quantify the percentages of water usage by different South Florida user groups
  • Create a mathematical model using a pie chart to illustrate water usage by user group in South Florida
  • Create an informational brochure about the importance of water to the Everglades and the need for water conservation
Gr. 8 Lesson 3-Everglades Dilemmas

Students will be able to:

  • Describe how different social and economic decisions impact the Everglades
  • Analyze and select actions related to water dilemmas associated with the Everglades
  • Write an explanatory essay about how decisions made on a daily basis have the potential to impact the Everglades
It's a Lovely Home, But...Using Multiple Texts to Aid in Decision Making

In this lesson, students will learn about a subject as they read and analyze multiple text types before writing a business letter explaining a decision they will be asked to make. This lesson incorporates poetry, authentic non-fiction, photography, and writing.

Rain in Summer: What a Bummer, Or Is It?

In this lesson, students will analyze the symbols and imagery present in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem "Rain in Summer" to determine its tone and theme. Formative assessment checks are included in the form of student handouts with text-based questions and charts. Students will also write a mini-essay as a summative assessment in which they will develop a claim about the poem's theme, providing text-based examples as support.

Remembering D-Day: A Close Reading Lesson

This is a close reading lesson based on the article "Remembering the D-Day Invasion with Salutes, Tears and Friendship." This article focuses on the anniversary of D-Day and the effect it had on soldiers and civilians who experienced the attack. This lesson provides an opportunity for close reading, vocabulary acquisition, and writing a summary. A vocabulary organizer and key, text-dependent questions and keys, and a writing rubric have been included.

CIS: Fat Weighs Heavy on the Brain

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended to be completed with 8th grade students. The article presents research regarding the impact obesity has not only on physical health, but on cognition as well. Students return to the article looking for information three times. Students present the evidence they collect while reading in a short writing assignment that is re-visited and shaped throughout the lesson.

Close Reading Exemplar: Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution

The goal of this one to two day exemplar from Student Achievement Partner web resources is to give students the opportunity to observe the dynamic nature of the Constitution through the practice of close reading and writing habits. By reading and re-reading the passage closely, and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will explore the questions Monk raises and perhaps even pursue additional avenues of inquiry. When combined with writing about the passage, not only will students form a deeper appreciation of Monk’s argument and the value of struggling with complex text, but of the Preamble of the Constitution itself.

What is Normal? Exploring Connotations and Denotations

The goal of this lesson is to give students the opportunity to explore the connotations and denotations of the word "normal" and its various meanings. Through the use of "Us and Them," a personal essay by David Sedaris, students will explore the various beliefs and points of view of "normal" based on the picture painted by Sedaris. Students will need to consider the emotional context of words and how diction reveals an author's tone and message, as well as how the use of irony can impact the tone of a piece. Students will also read and analyze a Time article, "An In-Depth View of America by the Numbers," by Nancy Gibbs. For the summative assessment, students will write an explanatory essay (several prompts are provided) about normality using evidence from the texts studied in the lesson for support.

To the Heart of Human Expression: Form and Theme in Poetry (Part 2 of 3)

In this second lesson of a three-part unit, students will explore how to identify and explain theme in poetry. Small group and full class discussions will be included as will a review of poetic and sound devices. Using Shakespeare's "Sonnet 71" and poetry of the Holocaust, students will analyze two poems and write theme analysis paragraphs for one of them with the help of a graphic organizer and rubric.

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier-An Intro to Analysis & Argumentation Part I of III

In this lesson, students will read chapters 1-7 of Ismael Beah's memoir, A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier while learning how to analyze the chapters using a reader response journal, create an oral argument through a Seed Discussion, and in writing a central idea statement.

Original Student Tutorial

Name Description
Surviving Extreme Conditions

In this tutorial, you will practice identifying relevant evidence within a text as you read excerpts from Jack London's short story, "To Build a Fire." Then, you'll practice your writing skills as you draft a short response using examples of relevant evidence from the story.

Tutorial

Name Description
Character Change: The Diary of Anne Frank

In this tutorial from PBS, students will explore what Anne Frank's writing and a video dramatization of her diary reveal about her character and how it changed while she was in hiding. They will develop their literacy skills as they explore how her character changes. During this process, they will also read informational text, learn and practice vocabulary words, and explore content through videos and interactive activities.

Student Resources

Original Student Tutorial

Name Description
Surviving Extreme Conditions:

In this tutorial, you will practice identifying relevant evidence within a text as you read excerpts from Jack London's short story, "To Build a Fire." Then, you'll practice your writing skills as you draft a short response using examples of relevant evidence from the story.



Printed On:9/23/2021 9:43:09 PM
Print Page | Close this window