Standard #: SC.912.P.10.16


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



Explain the relationship between moving charges and magnetic fields, as well as changing magnetic fields and electric fields, and their application to modern technologies.


General Information

Subject Area: Science
Grade: 912
Body of Knowledge: Physical Science
Standard: Energy -

A. Energy is involved in all physical and chemical processes. It is conserved, and can be transformed from one form to another and into work. At the atomic and nuclear levels energy is not continuous but exists in discrete amounts. Energy and mass are related through Einstein's equation E=mc2.

B. The properties of atomic nuclei are responsible for energy-related phenomena such as radioactivity, fission and fusion.

C. Changes in entropy and energy that accompany chemical reactions influence reaction paths. Chemical reactions result in the release or absorption of energy.

D. The theory of electromagnetism explains that electricity and magnetism are closely related. Electric charges are the source of electric fields. Moving charges generate magnetic fields.

E. Waves are the propagation of a disturbance. They transport energy and momentum but do not transport matter.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

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Related Access Points

Access Point Number Access Point Title
SC.912.P.10.In.5 Identify fundamental forces, including gravitational and electromagnetic.
SC.912.P.10.Su.9 Observe and identify the effects of magnetic attraction on iron.
SC.912.P.10.Pa.9 Recognize how magnets are used in real-world situations.


Related Resources

Educational Game

Name Description
Shoot an Electron


This interesting game is to hit the target located opposite a electron gun. The electron gun will fire an electron. This electron must not hit any walls or obstacles during the attempt. The user may direct the electron along a path by placing stationary positive and negative charges at various locations. This game will help support learning about the concept of the electric field, which is created when electrons repel other electrons.

Lesson Plans

Name Description
Strength of an Electromagnet

In this guided-inquiry lesson for advanced students in high school physics or integrated science classes, students will have an opportunity to conduct an experiment to test how the strength of an electromagnet can be affected by different variables. Students will derive equations from their data.

Magnetism Students investigate magnetism and which materials are attracted by magnets. Students describe the behavior of atoms in a magnet and explain why specific materials are or are not attracted to a magnet. The discussion questions explore several domains of science and relate them to magnetism.

Perspectives Video: Expert

Name Description
Electromagnetic Robot Muscles

Dr. Oates uses engineering practices to design artificial muscles that react to electrostatic fields.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Resource Collection

Name Description
Exploring Magnetism Lesson Series "These seven NASA-funded magnetism guides contain activity- or math-based lessons on magnetic fields. The science and mathematics education standards these activities cover are in the beginning of the guides... These guides were developed as part of the Education and Public Outreach programs of the following NASA science missions: STEREO-IMPACT, RHESSI, THEMIS, and FAST."

These are modules, including student worksheets, about magnetism in general and especially about the Earth's magnetic field.

Teaching Idea

Name Description
Magnet Lab This resource includes various programs, resources, and activities on electricity and magnetism developed by the FSU Mag Lab for teachers to better serve their students.

Text Resources

Name Description
World record for compact particle accelerator: Researchers ramp up energy of laser-plasma 'tabletop' accelerator

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Using one of the most powerful lasers in the world, researchers have accelerated subatomic particles to the highest energies ever recorded from a compact accelerator. The team used a specialized petawatt laser and a charged-particle gas called plasma to get the particles up to speed. The setup is known as a laser-plasma accelerator, an emerging class of particle accelerators that physicists believe can shrink traditional, miles-long accelerators to machines that can fit on a table.

Spider Webs More Effective at Snaring Electrically Charged Insects

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.

The text describes how negatively charged spider webs attract positively charged insects. The article includes a link to an optional video and two good pictures of insects interacting with spider webs. This resource also includes text-dependent questions.

X-ray 'Eyes'

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Scientists have discovered that X-rays can be used to photograph the movement of atoms and molecules in chemical reactions (i.e., photosynthesis).

Magnetism This site presents the basic ideas of magnetism and applies these ideas to the earth's magnetic field. There are several useful diagrams and pictures interspersed throughout this lesson, as well as links to more detailed subjects. This is an introduction to a larger collection on exploring the Earth's magnetosphere. A Spanish translation is available.

Tutorial

Name Description
Electromagnetic Wave Propagation
  • Observe that light is composed of oscillating electric and magnetic waves
  • Explore the propagation of an electromagnetic wave through its electric and magnetic field vectors
  • Observe the difference in propagation of light of different wavelengths

Video/Audio/Animations

Name Description
Paramagnetism Observe what happens when liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen are exposed to a high magnetic field
Learn the difference between diamagnetic and paramagnetic molecules
Superconductors Observe what happens when a magnet is placed on a superconductor
The Shrinking Quarter Machine

Magnetic and electric forces are used for shrinking a quarter to the size of a dime in a very short amount of time

Solar Wind's Effect on Earth The Sun produces a solar wind — a continuous flow of charged particles — that can affect us on Earth. It can, for example, disrupt communications, navigation systems, and satellites. Solar activity can also cause power outages, such as the extensive Canadian blackout in 1989. In this video segment adapted from NASA, learn about solar storms and their effects on Earth.

Virtual Manipulatives

Name Description
Reversing Velocity of a charged particle with magnetic field

This virtual manipulative will allow the user to see how a magnetic field will effect the motion of a charged particle. The charge of the particle and the size of the magnetic field can be changed.

Lorentz Force


This visual interactive simulation will help the student watch how a charged particle moves in a magnetic field. This force is defined as the Lorentz force which is the force on a point charge due to electromagnetic fields. There is a relationship between the movement of the particle through the magnetic field, the strength of that magnetic field and the force on the particle. The following equation described the force: F=qvB
Where:

  • F is the force in Newtons
  • q is the electric charge in coulombs
  • v is the velocity of the charge in meters/sound
  • B is the strength of the magnetic field.
Magnets and Electromagnets


This virtual manipulative will allow the students to explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet. Students can discover that magnetic fields are produced when all the electrons in a metal object are spinning in the same direction, either as a natural phenomenon, in an artificially created magnet, or when they are induced to do so by an electromagnetic field.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:

  • Predict the direction of the magnet field for different locations around a bar magnet and electromagnet.
  • Compare and contrast bar magnets and electromagnets.
  • Identify the characteristics of electromagnets that are variable and what effects each variable has on the magnetic field's strength and direction.
  • Relate magnetic field strength to distance quantitatively and qualitatively.
Generator
This virtual manipulative will help the students generate electricity with a bar magnet. Students can discover the physics behind the phenomena by exploring magnets and how they can be used to make a bulb light. They will recognize that any change in the magnetic environment of a coil of wire will cause a voltage to be induced in the coil.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:
  • Identify equipment and conditions that produce induction.
  • Compare and contrast how both a light bulb and voltmeter can be used to show characteristics of the induced current.
  • Predict how the current will change when the conditions are varied.
  • Explain practical applications of Faraday's Law.
  • Explain what is the cause of the induction.
Simplified MRI

Whether it is a tumor or not, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can tell. Your head is full of tiny radio transmitters (the nuclear spins of the hydrogen nuclei of your water molecules). In an MRI unit, these little radios can be made to broadcast their positions, giving a detailed picture of the inside of your head.

In this simulation you can:

  • Recognize that light can flip spins if the energy of the photons matches the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down.
  • Recognize that the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down is proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field.
  • Describe how to put these two ideas together to detect where there is a higher density of spins.
Faraday's Law
Light a bulb by waving a magnet. This demonstration of Faraday's law will help you to:
  • Explain what happens when the magnet moves through the coil at different speeds and how this affects the brightness of the bulb and the magnitude and sign of the voltage.
  • Explain the difference between moving the magnet through the coil from the right side versus the left side.
  • Explain the difference between moving magnet through the big coil versus the smaller coil.

Student Resources

Educational Game

Name Description
Shoot an Electron:


This interesting game is to hit the target located opposite a electron gun. The electron gun will fire an electron. This electron must not hit any walls or obstacles during the attempt. The user may direct the electron along a path by placing stationary positive and negative charges at various locations. This game will help support learning about the concept of the electric field, which is created when electrons repel other electrons.

Perspectives Video: Expert

Name Description
Electromagnetic Robot Muscles:

Dr. Oates uses engineering practices to design artificial muscles that react to electrostatic fields.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Text Resource

Name Description
Magnetism: This site presents the basic ideas of magnetism and applies these ideas to the earth's magnetic field. There are several useful diagrams and pictures interspersed throughout this lesson, as well as links to more detailed subjects. This is an introduction to a larger collection on exploring the Earth's magnetosphere. A Spanish translation is available.

Tutorial

Name Description
Electromagnetic Wave Propagation:
  • Observe that light is composed of oscillating electric and magnetic waves
  • Explore the propagation of an electromagnetic wave through its electric and magnetic field vectors
  • Observe the difference in propagation of light of different wavelengths

Video/Audio/Animation

Name Description
Solar Wind's Effect on Earth: The Sun produces a solar wind — a continuous flow of charged particles — that can affect us on Earth. It can, for example, disrupt communications, navigation systems, and satellites. Solar activity can also cause power outages, such as the extensive Canadian blackout in 1989. In this video segment adapted from NASA, learn about solar storms and their effects on Earth.

Virtual Manipulatives

Name Description
Reversing Velocity of a charged particle with magnetic field:

This virtual manipulative will allow the user to see how a magnetic field will effect the motion of a charged particle. The charge of the particle and the size of the magnetic field can be changed.

Generator:
This virtual manipulative will help the students generate electricity with a bar magnet. Students can discover the physics behind the phenomena by exploring magnets and how they can be used to make a bulb light. They will recognize that any change in the magnetic environment of a coil of wire will cause a voltage to be induced in the coil.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:
  • Identify equipment and conditions that produce induction.
  • Compare and contrast how both a light bulb and voltmeter can be used to show characteristics of the induced current.
  • Predict how the current will change when the conditions are varied.
  • Explain practical applications of Faraday's Law.
  • Explain what is the cause of the induction.
Simplified MRI:

Whether it is a tumor or not, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can tell. Your head is full of tiny radio transmitters (the nuclear spins of the hydrogen nuclei of your water molecules). In an MRI unit, these little radios can be made to broadcast their positions, giving a detailed picture of the inside of your head.

In this simulation you can:

  • Recognize that light can flip spins if the energy of the photons matches the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down.
  • Recognize that the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down is proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field.
  • Describe how to put these two ideas together to detect where there is a higher density of spins.
Faraday's Law:
Light a bulb by waving a magnet. This demonstration of Faraday's law will help you to:
  • Explain what happens when the magnet moves through the coil at different speeds and how this affects the brightness of the bulb and the magnitude and sign of the voltage.
  • Explain the difference between moving the magnet through the coil from the right side versus the left side.
  • Explain the difference between moving magnet through the big coil versus the smaller coil.


Parent Resources

Educational Game

Name Description
Shoot an Electron:


This interesting game is to hit the target located opposite a electron gun. The electron gun will fire an electron. This electron must not hit any walls or obstacles during the attempt. The user may direct the electron along a path by placing stationary positive and negative charges at various locations. This game will help support learning about the concept of the electric field, which is created when electrons repel other electrons.

Virtual Manipulatives

Name Description
Reversing Velocity of a charged particle with magnetic field:

This virtual manipulative will allow the user to see how a magnetic field will effect the motion of a charged particle. The charge of the particle and the size of the magnetic field can be changed.

Lorentz Force:


This visual interactive simulation will help the student watch how a charged particle moves in a magnetic field. This force is defined as the Lorentz force which is the force on a point charge due to electromagnetic fields. There is a relationship between the movement of the particle through the magnetic field, the strength of that magnetic field and the force on the particle. The following equation described the force: F=qvB
Where:

  • F is the force in Newtons
  • q is the electric charge in coulombs
  • v is the velocity of the charge in meters/sound
  • B is the strength of the magnetic field.
Magnets and Electromagnets:


This virtual manipulative will allow the students to explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet. Students can discover that magnetic fields are produced when all the electrons in a metal object are spinning in the same direction, either as a natural phenomenon, in an artificially created magnet, or when they are induced to do so by an electromagnetic field.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:

  • Predict the direction of the magnet field for different locations around a bar magnet and electromagnet.
  • Compare and contrast bar magnets and electromagnets.
  • Identify the characteristics of electromagnets that are variable and what effects each variable has on the magnetic field's strength and direction.
  • Relate magnetic field strength to distance quantitatively and qualitatively.
Generator:
This virtual manipulative will help the students generate electricity with a bar magnet. Students can discover the physics behind the phenomena by exploring magnets and how they can be used to make a bulb light. They will recognize that any change in the magnetic environment of a coil of wire will cause a voltage to be induced in the coil.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:
  • Identify equipment and conditions that produce induction.
  • Compare and contrast how both a light bulb and voltmeter can be used to show characteristics of the induced current.
  • Predict how the current will change when the conditions are varied.
  • Explain practical applications of Faraday's Law.
  • Explain what is the cause of the induction.
Simplified MRI:

Whether it is a tumor or not, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can tell. Your head is full of tiny radio transmitters (the nuclear spins of the hydrogen nuclei of your water molecules). In an MRI unit, these little radios can be made to broadcast their positions, giving a detailed picture of the inside of your head.

In this simulation you can:

  • Recognize that light can flip spins if the energy of the photons matches the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down.
  • Recognize that the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down is proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field.
  • Describe how to put these two ideas together to detect where there is a higher density of spins.
Faraday's Law:
Light a bulb by waving a magnet. This demonstration of Faraday's law will help you to:
  • Explain what happens when the magnet moves through the coil at different speeds and how this affects the brightness of the bulb and the magnitude and sign of the voltage.
  • Explain the difference between moving the magnet through the coil from the right side versus the left side.
  • Explain the difference between moving magnet through the big coil versus the smaller coil.


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