Standard #: MA.3.M.2.1


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Using analog and digital clocks tell and write time to the nearest minute using a.m. and p.m. appropriately.


Clarifications


Clarification 1: Within this benchmark, the expectation is not to understand military time.

General Information

Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 3
Strand: Measurement
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Benchmark Instructional Guide

Connecting Benchmarks/Horizontal Alignment

 

Terms from the K-12 Glossary

  • NA

Vertical Alignment

Previous Benchmarks

 

Next Benchmarks

 

Purpose and Instructional Strategies

The purpose of this benchmark is for students to tell time to the nearest minute, using a.m. and p.m. appropriately. In Grade 2, students tell and write time on analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, including using language that expressions fractional parts of an hour (e.g., “half of,” “half past,” “quarter of,” “quarter after,” and “quarter til”). Students also bring understanding about a.m. and p.m. from Grade 2, and they also related partitioned circles to number lines with the purpose of helping them count by 5s. 
  • Instruction should connect how students can count by fives and ones to identify the exact time on an analog clock. For example, if the time on an analog clock shows 3:19, students should know that they can use the minute hand to count by 5s to land at the 3 on the clock (15 minutes after the hour), and then count ahead 4 more minutes to represent 19 minutes. Students could also count by 5s to get to the 4 on the clock (20 minutes after the hour), and then count back one to get to 3:19. During instruction, allowing students opportunities to use flexible strategies for telling time will build understanding and continue to connect telling time to using number lines (MTR.4.1, MTR.5.1). 
  • Manipulatives that help students tell and write time are Judy clocks, virtual clocks, and number lines (that can be folded as a circle around a clock and unfolded to show a linear representation) (MTR.2.1). It is important to note that when using number lines during instruction, students should be given the opportunities to determine the intervals and size of jumps on their number line. This approach also connects to measuring lengths (MA.3.M.1.1).

 

Common Misconceptions or Errors

  • Students can misrepresent the location of the hour hand when expressing a given time on an analog clock. For example, when representing the hour hand for 3:19, students can be unsure where the hour hand is located between the 3 and 4. Model reasoning with students that the hour hand should be less than half way between 3 and 4 because 3:19 is before 3:30 when the hour hand would be in the middle. Allow for classroom discussions that encourage students to justify the location of hour hands between benchmarks when representing analog time.

 

Strategies to Support Tiered Instruction

  • Instruction includes classroom discussions that encourage students to justify the location of hour hands between benchmarks when representing analog time. 
  • Instruction includes how the hour hand moves around the clock. Instruction includes using a one-handed (hour hand only) clock. As students receive given times from the teacher, they should reason the location of the hour hand for that given time. 
    • For example, the teacher models where the hour hand of the clock should be if the time is 2:37, reasoning for the students so they understand that they should point the hour hand slightly more than halfway between the 2 and the 3 on the clock because 2:37 is just past 2:30. 

Analog clock

  • Instruction includes understanding that the hour hand moves around the clock. Instruction includes using a geared manipulative clock. This clock will demonstrate the relationship between the minute hand and hour hand moving around the clock. 
    • For example, the teacher moves the hands on the clock so the hour hand is slightly more than half-way between the 2 and the 3 asking, “What time do you think it is on the clock?” (The clock reads approximately 2:37.) The teacher allows for classroom discussions that encourage students to justify the location of hour hands between benchmarks when representing analog time.

 

Instructional Tasks

Instructional Task 1 

Digital clock

Show the same time represented on the digital clock on the analog clock below.
analog clock without arms

 

Instructional Items

Instructional Item 1 

Alex goes to the grocery store in the morning at the time shown. 

analog clock

What time does Alex go to the grocery store? Write the time on the line and circle a.m. or p.m. 
_________ a.m./p.m. 

 

*The strategies, tasks and items included in the B1G-M are examples and should not be considered comprehensive.




Related Courses

Course Number1111 Course Title222
5012050: Grade Three Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712040: Access Mathematics Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012055: Grade 3 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012015: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 3-5 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))


Related Access Points

Access Point Number Access Point Title
MA.3.M.2.AP.1 Using analog and digital clocks, express the time to the nearest five minutes using a.m. and p.m. appropriately.


Related Resources

Formative Assessment

Name Description
Telling Time

Students determine time shown on an analog clock to the nearest minute.

Lesson Plans

Name Description
Patriotism Fair

Students will create a schedule for a Patriotism Fair using their knowledge of four national holidays (Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Founders Month) and elapsed time.  An extension activity is included for students to create a banner based on one of the holidays that could be used during an actual Patriotism Fair.

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 6 Condensation Experiment

Students set up an experiment and gather data to investigate the condensation of water.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

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Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 4 Melting Experiment

Students set up an experiment and gather data to investigate the melting of solid water.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit ofSaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

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Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 2 Changes to Water: Boiling and Freezing

Students learn water can change state of matter through the addition or removal of heat.
Students will learn the boiling and freezing points of water at standard pressure. Students
will also review how data can be used to create line graphs and these graphs can show
patterns and changes to temperature over time.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit  https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

"Amazing Race-Elapsed Time"

In this lesson, which focuses specifically on the elapsed time portion of the standard, students work in small groups in a "race" to solve real world problems involving time.

Sweet Donut Shop

In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, students will help the Sweet Donut Shop determine what the newest donut will be. Students are given the cost to make each batch along with the selling price and are asked to determine the profit for each batch. Students create a procedure for ranking the donuts and write a letter explaining the procedure and the ranking. In the “twist” students are provided the starting and finishing times for each batch. They must determine the total amount of time, decide if their procedure should change based on the new information, and write a letter explaining whether the procedure changed and the new ranking of the donuts.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Your Time Is Up!

Time Out! In this lesson, students will learn about elapsed time. Watching one short video, working with number lines, and working with an online tool will all be ways that the students learn about elapsed time.

Hands on the Clock

This lesson gives students an opportunity to apply time knowledge to identify time intervals to the nearest minute.

Do You Have a Minute?

In this lesson students use an analog clock to tell time to the nearest minute. Addition word problems involving time increments of minutes are solved by students using a number line.

Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lessons

Name Description
Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 15 Beat the Heat MEA Part 2: Cooler Experiment

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will use ice to test
the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons. Students will take
measurements and collect data on their cooler. In part 3, students will analyze the data
they collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting the most
effective cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. In the optional twist,
students will need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 16 Beat the Heat MEA Part 3: Analyzing Cooler Data

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will be asked to use
ice to test the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons.
Students will take measurements and collect data on their cooler. In Part 3 of this activity,
students will analyze the data they collected in Part 2 by drawing and interpreting a scaled
bar graph and line graph. Students will participate in a discussion about how to interpret the
data that was collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting the best
cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. In the optional twist, students will
need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 17 Beat the Heat MEA Part 4: Ranking Procedure

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will be asked to use
ice to test the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons.
Students will take measurements and collect data on their cooler. In part 3, students will
analyze the data they collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting
the best cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. They will communicate their
findings and procedure via a letter to next year’s class. In the optional twist, students will
need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Original Student Tutorial

Name Description
Count Every Minute

Learn to read analog and digital clocks to the nearest minute in this interactive tutorial.

Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Name Description
One Handed Clocks

Unlock an effective teaching strategy for using one-handed clocks to help students learn to tell time in this Teacher Perspectives video for educators.

Student Resources

Original Student Tutorial

Name Description
Count Every Minute:

Learn to read analog and digital clocks to the nearest minute in this interactive tutorial.



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