Expectation 3: Make inferences to support comprehension.

General Information
Number: ELA.K12.EE.3
Title: Make inferences to support comprehension.
Type: Expectation
Subject: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: K12
Strand: Expectations

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Lesson Plans

We the Kids: The Preamble of the Constitution: Introduction to the Preamble of the Constitution of the United States:

This is lesson #1 in the text unit series for We the Kids by David Catrow. In this lesson, students will demonstrate their background knowledge on the Constitution of the United States, including the Preamble, by completing the sentence “We the People. . .” They will create a KWL chart that will be used throughout the unit to keep track of information learned. They will listen to first page of the text read aloud to them to begin to learn about the Preamble.

This unit will help students gain an understanding of the preamble and its direct effect on their daily lives. Students will engage in various activities such as debating parts of the preamble and complete a play interpreting patriotism. Throughout the unit students will have to identify and interpret vocabulary, analyze the provided text, and demonstrate an understanding of the Preamble by providing relevant details. The teacher’s role in this unit will be to support their students' understanding of the Preamble by facilitating research and reviewing student writing.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Currency Symbol Scavenger Hunt:

This is lesson 6 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl, pages 12-19. Students will analyze the symbols used to create the Great Seal. Students will have a chance to explore artifacts such as the dollar bill, penny, and quarter with a magnifying glass. Students will add to background knowledge by continuing to discover how the Great Seal of the United States was created and what it stands for. Students will also create a great seal using symbols and explain the meanings behind the symbols.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Units is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lesson 3: Productivity:

 This lesson covers:

•Why microalgae are important to all life on Earth

•How nutrients enter the ocean

•The relationship between microalgae, nutrients, and productivity

Type: Lesson Plan

The Democratic Process: Bill of Rights - Rights and Responsibilities:

This is lesson #3 in the text unit series for The Democratic Process by Mark Friedman. The lesson will explore citizen’s individual rights, which rights were influenced by the ancient Greek and Roman democratic process, and current challenges to democracy. Students will read the text for background information, make personal and real-world connections, and research current challenges to democracy and how it impacts their lives.

The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Getting to Know the Great Seal:

This is lesson #1 in the paired text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl. In this lesson students will make observations about relevant details on The Great Seal of the United States, as a prereading activity. Then students will complete a graphic organizer to demonstrate what they see, what they inferred or predicted each symbol represents in regard to the United States, and what they still wonder about The Great Seal.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Units is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of both The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to ither documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Long Walk to Water Lesson 5: Government Obligations/Services:

This is lesson #5 in the text unit series for A Long Walk to Water. Using prior knowledge students have acquired pertaining to the U.S. Constitution and the establishment of shared powers, students will read, infer, paraphrase, classify, and describe the government's obligations and services extended to citizens of Sudan at the Federal and State levels.  Additionally, students will be able to compare the impact of Federal and State powers on the citizens of Sudan explaining it's importance on U.S. history.

?This unit is a unit focused on students examining the ways in which political and social issues impact an individual’s survival in a challenging experience. The unit’s activities will allow students to make connections to U.S. Founding Documents, citizenship, rights of citizens, common good, government responsibilities and foreign policies created to protect all individuals.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Paraphrasing President Lincoln: The Words of Honest Abe:

In this lesson, students will review the basic rules for effective paraphrasing. Students will read a short speech that President Abraham Lincoln delivered to Union troops during the civil war. They will paraphrase several key sections to strengthen their paraphrasing skills and analyze the use of figurative language to deepen their knowledge of the United States' foundational principles. Students will also answer text-dependent questions to further analyze Lincoln’s remarks.

Type: Lesson Plan

Language of Liberty: The Declaration of Independence:

In this lesson, students will learn the basic rules for effective paraphrasing. Students will read an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence and paraphrase several key sentences to develop their paraphrasing skills and deepen their knowledge of this foundational document. Students will also use reference materials to determine the appropriate definitions of advanced vocabulary within the Declaration of Independence excerpt. Finally, students will answer text-dependent questions to deepen their analysis of the essential rights outlined in this foundational document.

Type: Lesson Plan

Declaration of Sentiments: Recognizing and Analyzing Rhetorical Appeals:

In this lesson, students will read Elizabeth Cady Stanton's "Declaration of Sentiments," delivered at America's first women's rights convention in the United States, the Seneca Falls Convention. Students will identify the rhetorical appeals (ethos, pathos, and logos) Stanton uses throughout her speech. Students will explain how Stanton's varied purposes are achieved through those appeals.

Students will also complete text-dependent questions to further analyze the speech. As part of this analysis, they will make connections between Stanton's speech and the foundational principles established in the Declaration of Independence.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Peaceful & Prosperous World: Paraphrasing President Carter:

In this lesson, students will learn and implement the basic rules for effective paraphrasing. Students will read the 1979 State of the Union address by President Jimmy Carter. They will paraphrase several key sections to develop their paraphrasing skills and deepen their knowledge of the United States’ foundational principles referenced in the address, particularly those related to the Bill of Rights. Students will also answer text-dependent questions to further analyze President Carter’s address.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let Us Continue:

In this lesson plan, students will read excerpts from President Lyndon Johnson’s “Let Us Continue” speech. Johnson delivered this speech to a joint session of Congress on November 27, 1963, just days after being sworn into office due to the death of President John F. Kennedy. Students will study excerpts from the speech, analyzing and comparing two central ideas and their supporting evidence. During the lesson, students will collaborate on their analysis, write observations based on their evidence, and answer text-dependent and standards-based questions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Paraphrasing LBJ: American Progress:

In this lesson, students will sharpen their paraphrasing skills using a speech by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Students will paraphrase several key sections from LBJ's speech following the 1968 Civil Rights Act. In doing so, they will learn the four steps to paraphrasing effectively.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Tasks of Our Time: Paraphrasing President Biden's Inaugural Address:

In this lesson, students will learn the basic rules for effective paraphrasing. Students will read the 2021 inaugural address of President Joseph Biden. They will paraphrase several key sections to sharpen their paraphrasing skills and deepen their knowledge of the United States’ foundational principles referenced in the address. Students will also answer text-dependent questions to further analyze President Biden’s address.

Type: Lesson Plan

Paraphrasing President Obama: Answering the Call:

In this lesson, students will read President Barack Obama’s second inaugural address from 2013. Students will paraphrase several important sections of President Obama’s speech to develop their paraphrasing skills and evaluate the president’s use of figurative language and emotional appeal to establish purpose. Students will also complete text-dependent questions to further analyze the speech. As part of this analysis, they will express their comprehension of the key elements and overall message of his speech.

Type: Lesson Plan

Civics Literacy John F. Kennedy - A Moral Issue:

In this lesson, students will read an excerpt from John F. Kennedy's speech, commonly titled "A Moral Issue", in response to the Civil Rights Movement. Upon reading the text, students will analyze and evaluate President Kennedy's use of ethos, as well as the impact of delivering the speech via live broadcast. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Spirit of Liberty: Analyzing Two Central Ideas:

In this lesson, students will read “The Spirit of Liberty” delivered by Learned Hand in 1944 to a crowd of more than a million people in New York's Central Park for an event billed as "I Am an American Day." Students will analyze the two distinct central ideas that emerge in the speech. They will identify the textual evidence within the speech that supports each central idea. Students will also complete text-dependent questions to further analyze the speech. Students will also make connections with civics content by analyzing Hand’s speech to examine how he emphasizes the common good as a responsibility of citizenship.

Type: Lesson Plan

Florida's History and Geography :

Students will use a self-guided reference presentation to complete a mapping activity of Florida and learn about its early history. 

Type: Lesson Plan

“Ain’t I a Woman?” – Using Ethos to Achieve Purpose:

In this lesson, students will read Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech, delivered in 1851 to men and women attending the Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. Students will analyze how the use of rhetorical appeals, specifically ethos, helps Truth establish and achieve her purpose. Students will describe how this use of ethos supports Truth’s purpose to persuade Americans to support equal voting rights, especially for women, citing text evidence when appropriate.

Students will complete text-dependent questions to clarify their comprehension of the speech. In addition, they will make connections between Truth’s speech and the foundational principles expressed in an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Power of Ideas: Paraphrasing President Clinton's Inaugural Address:

In this lesson, students will learn the basic rules for effective paraphrasing. Students will read the 1993 inaugural address of President Bill Clinton. They will paraphrase several key sections to develop their paraphrasing skills and deepen their knowledge of the United States foundational principles and global leadership referenced in the address. Students will also answer text-dependent questions to further analyze the ideas and content of President Clinton’s address.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Pledge of Allegiance:

Students will learn the history of the Pledge of Allegiance, the proper behaviors to display while reciting the pledge, and the meaning behind the words. 

Type: Lesson Plan

I Am the Greatest-Athenian Leadership:

This lesson will be taught during the Ancient Greece unit. While the lesson teaches about the civic accomplishments of Solon, Cleisthenes, Themistocles, and Pericles, students are asked to go one step further by selecting the most influential leader and justifying their selections.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bill of Rights Visual and Manipulatives :

Students will use visuals to match descriptions of the Bill of Rights. Students will reflect on the impact of the Bill of Rights in a writing prompt. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Florida's History :

Introduce students to Florida's History. In a student-guided/self-paced presentation, students will learn about the influence of Majroie Stoneman Douglas and Andrew Jackson. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Trial Process and Role of Juries:

In this lesson plan, students will describe the trial process and role of juries in the administration of justice at both state and federal levels. Students will act out a Mock Trial and answer questions based on the process shown during the play. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Over There: America Prepares for War:

This lesson will be part of the World War I unit. Students will analyze George M. Cohan’s song, “Over There” to evaluate how he used propaganda techniques to gather support for the nation’s entry into WWI. It will also demonstrate how one individual can influence public policy and how the song helped boost morale and prepare the people for war.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reconstruction and Jim Crow: Gallery Walk:

In this lesson, students will review important legislation and reactions to it during and after Reconstruction, and analyze how both impacted the lives of African Americans.

Type: Lesson Plan

Holidays that Celebrate America:

In this lesson plan, students will explore the history and meaning behind various patriotic holidays and make personal connections with those holidays including, Constitution Day, Memorial Day, Veteran’s Day, Patriot Day, President’s Day, Independence Day, and Medal of Honor Day.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Rule of Law in the United States of America:

In this lesson plan students will identify characteristics of rule of law and decide if rule of law is present or lacking in certain situations and to trace the development of the concept of rule of law in different historical settings. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Breaking Up with Britain:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the Declaration of Independence. The teacher will lead a discussion, breaking down the document into four sections and introducing challenging vocabulary. Student groups will use inferencing skills to complete cloze notes with terms given in a word bank.

Type: Lesson Plan

Classroom Civility:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze images in order to identify characteristics of civility and civic virtue.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Power of the Veto:

In this lesson, students will analyze the U.S. Constitution and other primary sources to evaluate the power and impact of the presidential veto. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of checks and balances by answering a higher-level short-answer question about the power of the veto. 

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. Constitution Amendment Process:

In this lesson plan, students will explain the methods to propose and ratify amendments to the U.S. Constitution while recognizing the difficulty to successfully amend the document.

Type: Lesson Plan

Resolving State versus Federal Issues:

In this lesson plan, students will explain how issues between Florida, other states and the federal government are resolved.

Type: Lesson Plan

Why the Constitution Was Ratified:

In this lesson plan, students analyze excerpts from the Federalist Papers and Anti-Federalist Essays and determine the founding principles presented in each one. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Reconstruction Amendments:

In this lesson plan, students will evaluate how amendments to the U.S. Constitution expanded opportunities for civic participation through Reconstruction.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ratification of the Constitution:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists and their role in the debates over ratification of the U.S. Constitution.

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. Citizenship: Permanent Residents and Naturalization:

In this lesson plan, students will identify permanent residency and explain the naturalization process for becoming a U.S. citizen. Students will read about the naturalization process, complete an analysis of the reading, and finish with scenarios, identifying whether or not someone can become a citizen.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Independent Regulatory Agency Interactions:

In this lesson plan, students will explore the interactions between the branches of the government, independent regulatory agencies, the American people, and industry.  

Type: Lesson Plan

The Declaration of Independence: Analyzing Two Central Ideas:

In this lesson, students will analyze the Declaration of Independence, one of America's founding documents. Students will analyze two central ideas of this text and their supporting evidence. Students will also answer text-dependent questions to convey their understanding of the text, and they'll examine the foundational ideals and principles that are expressed within the document. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Build a New School:

Students will calculate, interpret, and use measures of center and spread of different populations to determine in which city in Manatee County new schools should be built. Students will also use percentages to estimate the future population of school-aged children which will be used to determine where new schools should be built.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.They resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sources of Income: Scenarios:

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of different sources of income by analyzing then sorting career and job scenarios into income categories, in this lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lesson 5: Harmful Algal Blooms:

 This lesson covers:

•What harmful algal blooms are

•How harmful algal blooms occur

•Different types of harmful algal blooms and where they occur in Florida

Type: Lesson Plan

Lesson 4: Interannual Variability- El Nino & La Nina:

 This lesson covers:

•The El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle

•How El Niño/La Niña events affect Florida

•How El Niño/La Niña events affect productivity off the coast of Peru

Type: Lesson Plan

Lesson 1: Introduction to Oceanography & Remote Sensing:

This lesson covers:

•How the ocean moves and why it is important to all life on Earth

•Different geologic features in the ocean and how they impact currents

•How the Earth and ocean are studied by satellites and remote sensing

•How to use a web based program to interpret real world satellite data

Type: Lesson Plan

Lesson 2: Currents and Temperature:

This lesson covers:

  • How wind influences ocean currents
  • How currents transport heat and water around the world
  • Florida specific currents and oceanography
  • How currents connect the world’s climate

Type: Lesson Plan

Let Me Introduce You: Character Introductions in The Canterbury Tales:

In this lesson series, students will analyze how Geoffrey Chaucer introduces some of his characters in the prologue to The Canterbury Tales. Students will analyze Chaucer's introduction and portrayal of the characters. They will examine the text for directly stated characteristics, and draw inferences supported by appropriate evidence from the text. The lesson includes a graphic organizer and sample answer key. A number of writing prompts have been included throughout the lesson, and a writing rubric has been provided as well.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bringing Characters to Life: Characterization in The Illustrated Man:

In this lesson, students will study the prologue of The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury. They'll examine how the author reveals aspects of a character through the use of direct and indirect characterization. They'll also make inferences about a character based on the characterization and text evidence provided. Further, they'll analyze how characterization connects to the specific setting and events within the prologue. At the end of the lesson, students will create a detailed character sketch based on direct and indirect characterization as well as inferences made when reading the text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Charlotte's Web: Chapter 1:

In this reading lesson, students will determine the meaning of vocabulary words and explain the development of the main character, Fern, using Chapter 1 of E.B. White's Charlotte's Web. Students will respond to the text by writing an opinion paragraph.

Type: Lesson Plan

Where Should I Go to College? :

Students will create and use data displays to determine which college is the right fit for him or her / for hypothetical students. They will justify the data displays they selected, present this information to classmates and write an essay justifying their choice.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fast Food Frenzy:

In this activity, students will engage critically with nutritional information and macronutrient content of several fast food meals. This is an MEA that requires students to build on prior knowledge of nutrition and working with percentages.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Select a Healthcare Plan:

Students are asked to determine a procedure for ranking healthcare plans based on their assumptions and the cost of each plan given as a function. Then, they are asked to revise their ranking based on a new set of data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Prom Preparations:

Students will make decisions concerning features of their prom. Students will perform operations with percent and decimals to solve real-world problems involving money.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Fast Can You Go:

Students will apply skills (making a scatter plot, finding Line of Best Fit, finding an equation and predicting the y-value of a point on the line given its x-coordinate) to a fuel efficiency problem and then consider other factors such as color, style, and horsepower when designing a new coupe vehicle.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

We Learned About the Challenger:

This series includes four parts focused on the Challenger explosion. Students will read President Reagan’s address to the nation presented on the evening of the Challenger Space Shuttle explosion in January 1986. Students will then analyze the speech and determine which relevant details support Reagan’s central idea. Additionally, students will complete close reading activities individually, with partners, and in small groups as they prepare to draft an expository essay outlining the relevant details that support Reagan’s central idea.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pack It Up:

Students use geometry formulas to solve a fruit growing company's dilemma of packing fruit into crates of varying dimensions. Students calculate the volume of the crates and the volume of the given fruit when given certain numerical facts about the fruit and the crates.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Is That How It Happened?:

In this lesson, students will participate in various sequencing activities using a teacher selected text. With a partner, students will recall events from the text to complete a graphic organizer that outlines the beginning, middle, and end of the story being read. Students will independently sequence pre-selected pictures from the text and write sentences that describe the pictures.

Type: Lesson Plan

"Paul Revere's Ride": How Longfellow Creates a Hero in a Long Poem:

In this lesson, students will identify examples of metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole, and imagery in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem, “Paul Revere’s Ride.” Students will analyze how figurative language contributes to meaning in the text and explain how the different figurative language devices work together to depict Paul Revere as a historical hero.

Type: Lesson Plan

Disappearing Frogs: Percentage and Environment:

Students will explore and assess the implications various human and environmental factors are having on the yellow-legged frog population in California. Students will use knowledge of percentages to calculate population size and will complete research to explore the affects of human impact on the environment and the process of adaptation through natural and artificial selection.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Type: Lesson Plan

The Rise of the Mongoose: Analyzing Character Confrontations in "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi":

In this lesson, students will study the short story "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" by Rudyard Kipling. Students will analyze the confrontations that drive the story's plot, noting what happens and who is involved, how Rikki's character is developed through each confrontation, and how each confrontation helps develop the plot. A copy of the story is included with the lesson, as well as a text discussion guide for teachers, comprehension questions, a vocabulary key, a graphic organizer and key, and an optional rubric for the summative assessment. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lessons

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 14 Beat the Heat MEA Part 1: Setting up the Cooler Experiment:

this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In Part 1 of this activity, students will learn how to set up the
cooler experiment. They will watch a video and take notes. Students will also develop their
hypothesis in preparation to perform the experiment. In part 2, students will be asked to
use ice to test the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons.
Students will take measurements and collect data on their cooler. In part 3, students will
analyze the data they collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting
the most effective cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. In the optional
twist, students will need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit ofSaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 15 Beat the Heat MEA Part 2: Cooler Experiment:

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will use ice to test
the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons. Students will take
measurements and collect data on their cooler. In part 3, students will analyze the data
they collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting the most
effective cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. In the optional twist,
students will need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 16 Beat the Heat MEA Part 3: Analyzing Cooler Data:

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will be asked to use
ice to test the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons.
Students will take measurements and collect data on their cooler. In Part 3 of this activity,
students will analyze the data they collected in Part 2 by drawing and interpreting a scaled
bar graph and line graph. Students will participate in a discussion about how to interpret the
data that was collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting the best
cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. In the optional twist, students will
need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 17 Beat the Heat MEA Part 4: Ranking Procedure:

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will be asked to use
ice to test the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons.
Students will take measurements and collect data on their cooler. In part 3, students will
analyze the data they collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting
the best cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. They will communicate their
findings and procedure via a letter to next year’s class. In the optional twist, students will
need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 9 Cool Cooler Design Model-Eliciting Activity (MEA):

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. Students
will be asked to rank coolers based on data to solve an open-ended, realistic problem, while
considering constraints and tradeoffs. In the optional twist, students will need to take the
mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit ofSaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

 

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Original Student Tutorials

Risky Betting: Text Evidence and Inferences (Part Two):

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Risky Betting: Text Evidence and Inferences (Part One):

Read the famous short story “The Bet” by Anton Chekhov and explore the impact of a fifteen-year bet made between a lawyer and a banker in this three-part tutorial series.

In Part One, you’ll cite textual evidence that supports an analysis of what the text states explicitly, or directly, and make inferences and support them with textual evidence. By the end of Part One, you should be able to make three inferences about how the bet has transformed the lawyer by the middle of the story and support your inferences with textual evidence.

Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click HERE to launch "Risky Betting: Text Evidence and Inferences (Part Two)."

Click HERE to launch "Risky Betting: Analyzing a Universal Theme (Part Three)." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part Two:

Get ready to travel back in time to London, England during the Victorian era in this interactive tutorial that uses text excerpts from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. You should complete Part One before beginning this tutorial. In Part Two, you will read excerpts from the last half of the story and practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text. In the third tutorial in this series, you’ll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. 

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click to HERE launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part One:

Practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text as you read excerpts from one of the most famous works of horror fiction of all time, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. 

This tutorial is Part One of a three-part tutorial. In Part Two, you'll continue your analysis of the text. In Part Three, you'll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. Make sure to complete all three parts! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Happy Halloween! Textual Evidence and Inferences:

Cite text evidence and make inferences about the "real" history of Halloween in this spooky interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Cyberwar! Citing Evidence and Making Inferences:

Learn how to cite evidence and draw inferences in this interactive tutorial. Using an informational text about cyber attacks, you'll practice identifying text evidence and making inferences based on the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Westward Bound: Exploring Evidence and Inferences:

Learn to identify explicit textual evidence and make inferences based on the text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll sharpen your analysis skills while reading about the famed American explorers, Lewis and Clark, and their trusted companion, Sacagawea. You'll practice analyzing the explicit textual evidence wihtin the text, and you'll also make your own inferences based on the available evidence. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Wild Words: Analyzing the Extended Metaphor in "The Stolen Child":

Learn to identify and analyze extended metaphors using W.B. Yeats' poem, "The Stolen Child." In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine how Yeats uses figurative language to express the extended metaphor throughout this poem. We'll focus on his use of these seven types of imagery: visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, tactile, kinesthetic, and organic. Finally, we'll analyze how the poem's extended metaphor conveys a deeper meaning within the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

"The Last Leaf" – Making Inferences:

Learn how to make inferences based on the information included in the text in this interactive tutorial. Using the short story "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry, you'll practice identifying both the explicit and implicit information in the story. You'll apply your own reasoning to make inferences based on what is stated both explicitly and implicitly in the text. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Texts:

Learn how to make inferences using the novel Hoot in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn how to identify both explicit and implicit information in the story to make inferences about characters and events.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Joy That Kills:

Learn how to make inferences when reading a fictional text using the textual evidence provided. In this tutorial, you'll read the short story "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin. You'll practice identifying what is directly stated in the text and what requires the use of inference. You'll practice making your own inferences and supporting them with evidence from the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Idea

A New Birth of Freedom: Lincoln's Gettysburg Address:

This teaching resource will provide teachers the tools to analyze the “Gettysburg Address” delivered by President Abraham Lincoln (1863) in which he dedicates a portion of the Civil War battlefield at Gettysburg to honor the country’s Founders and the soldiers who died in the name of American ideals. He also urges the audience to continue to fight for the core principles upon which America was founded: equality and liberty. Students will analyze the two central ideas of Lincoln’s address. Students will also make connections between an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence and Lincoln’s speech, and they will make connections between the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution and Lincoln’s speech.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resources

Hope During War: Analyzing Rhetorical Appeals:

This teaching resource provides the tools for teachers to help students analyze the use of rhetorical appeals in President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. This resource will help students understand how President Lincoln specifically used ethos, pathos, and logos to achieve his purpose.

Type: Text Resource

Case Study: Clear the Path:

Using this case study, students can discuss, What factors contribute to a safe, productive workplace?

 

Type: Text Resource

Case Study: The Only Constant Is Change:

Using this case study, students can discuss types of strategies that would be successful for adjusting to changes or setbacks.

Type: Text Resource

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Risky Betting: Text Evidence and Inferences (Part Two):

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Risky Betting: Text Evidence and Inferences (Part One):

Read the famous short story “The Bet” by Anton Chekhov and explore the impact of a fifteen-year bet made between a lawyer and a banker in this three-part tutorial series.

In Part One, you’ll cite textual evidence that supports an analysis of what the text states explicitly, or directly, and make inferences and support them with textual evidence. By the end of Part One, you should be able to make three inferences about how the bet has transformed the lawyer by the middle of the story and support your inferences with textual evidence.

Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click HERE to launch "Risky Betting: Text Evidence and Inferences (Part Two)."

Click HERE to launch "Risky Betting: Analyzing a Universal Theme (Part Three)." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part Two:

Get ready to travel back in time to London, England during the Victorian era in this interactive tutorial that uses text excerpts from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. You should complete Part One before beginning this tutorial. In Part Two, you will read excerpts from the last half of the story and practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text. In the third tutorial in this series, you’ll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. 

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click to HERE launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part One:

Practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text as you read excerpts from one of the most famous works of horror fiction of all time, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. 

This tutorial is Part One of a three-part tutorial. In Part Two, you'll continue your analysis of the text. In Part Three, you'll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. Make sure to complete all three parts! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Happy Halloween! Textual Evidence and Inferences:

Cite text evidence and make inferences about the "real" history of Halloween in this spooky interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Cyberwar! Citing Evidence and Making Inferences:

Learn how to cite evidence and draw inferences in this interactive tutorial. Using an informational text about cyber attacks, you'll practice identifying text evidence and making inferences based on the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Westward Bound: Exploring Evidence and Inferences:

Learn to identify explicit textual evidence and make inferences based on the text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll sharpen your analysis skills while reading about the famed American explorers, Lewis and Clark, and their trusted companion, Sacagawea. You'll practice analyzing the explicit textual evidence wihtin the text, and you'll also make your own inferences based on the available evidence. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Wild Words: Analyzing the Extended Metaphor in "The Stolen Child":

Learn to identify and analyze extended metaphors using W.B. Yeats' poem, "The Stolen Child." In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine how Yeats uses figurative language to express the extended metaphor throughout this poem. We'll focus on his use of these seven types of imagery: visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, tactile, kinesthetic, and organic. Finally, we'll analyze how the poem's extended metaphor conveys a deeper meaning within the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

"The Last Leaf" – Making Inferences:

Learn how to make inferences based on the information included in the text in this interactive tutorial. Using the short story "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry, you'll practice identifying both the explicit and implicit information in the story. You'll apply your own reasoning to make inferences based on what is stated both explicitly and implicitly in the text. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Texts:

Learn how to make inferences using the novel Hoot in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn how to identify both explicit and implicit information in the story to make inferences about characters and events.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Joy That Kills:

Learn how to make inferences when reading a fictional text using the textual evidence provided. In this tutorial, you'll read the short story "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin. You'll practice identifying what is directly stated in the text and what requires the use of inference. You'll practice making your own inferences and supporting them with evidence from the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Lesson Plan

Holidays that Celebrate America:

In this lesson plan, students will explore the history and meaning behind various patriotic holidays and make personal connections with those holidays including, Constitution Day, Memorial Day, Veteran’s Day, Patriot Day, President’s Day, Independence Day, and Medal of Honor Day.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.