Art History and Criticism 2 Honors (#0100340) 


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Course Standards

The following Florida State Standards for Mathematical Practices are applicable to this course.
  • Attend to precision. (MP 6)
  • Look for and make use of structure. (MP 7)

Name Description
VA.912.C.1.4: Apply art knowledge and contextual information to analyze how content and ideas are used in works of art.
Clarifications:
e.g., symbolism, spatial relationship
VA.912.C.2.4: Classify artworks, using accurate art vocabulary and knowledge of art history to identify and categorize movements, styles, techniques, and materials.
VA.912.C.3.1: Use descriptive terms and varied approaches in art analysis to explain the meaning or purpose of an artwork.
Clarifications:
e.g., four-step method of art criticism, visual-thinking skills, aesthetic scanning
VA.912.C.3.3: Examine relationships among social, historical, literary, and/or other references to explain how they are assimilated into artworks.
VA.912.C.3.5: Make connections between timelines in other content areas and timelines in the visual arts.
VA.912.F.1.5: Create a digital or time-based presentation to analyze and compare artists, artworks, and concepts in historical context.
VA.912.F.2.3: Analyze the potential economic impact of arts entities to revitalize a community or region.
VA.912.F.2.8: Describe community resources to preserve, restore, exhibit, and view works of art.
VA.912.F.3.2: Examine the rationale for using procedural, analytical, and divergent thinking to achieve visual literacy.
Clarifications:
e.g., information literacy; media
VA.912.F.3.5: Use appropriately cited sources to document research and present information on visual culture.
Clarifications:
e.g., visual, digital, and textual information
VA.912.F.3.12: Use digital equipment and peripheral devices to record, create, present, and/or share accurate visual images with others.
VA.912.H.1.1: Analyze the impact of social, ecological, economic, religious, and/or political issues on the function or meaning of the artwork.
VA.912.H.1.5: Investigate the use of technology and media design to reflect creative trends in visual culture.
VA.912.H.1.8: Analyze and compare works in context, considering economic, social, cultural, and political issues, to define the significance and purpose of art.
Clarifications:
e.g., patronage, authority, iconography, gender, semiotics, deconstruction
VA.912.H.1.9: Describe the significance of major artists, architects, or masterworks to understand their historical influences.
VA.912.H.2.1: Identify transitions in art media, technique, and focus to explain how technology has changed art throughout history.
VA.912.H.2.4: Research the history of art in public places to examine the significance of the artwork and its legacy for the future.
Clarifications:
e.g., patron, corporate collections
VA.912.H.3.1: Synthesize knowledge and skills learned from non-art content areas to support the processes of creation, interpretation, and analysis.
VA.912.S.1.6: Describe processes and techniques used to record visual imagery.
Clarifications:
e.g., drawing, sculpting, digital multi-media
LAFS.910.RST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.
LAFS.910.RST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
LAFS.910.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
LAFS.910.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
LAFS.910.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

Students explore art and architecture as an expressive response to the artist’s experience. Through research and analysis of significant works and their historical contexts students examine changes in the understanding and structures of art production throughout the world. Students examine influential factors, such as people and events, societal and political changes, technological advancements, philosophical ideas, and cross-cultural influences as a means of discovering and tracing the changing definition of art. Student historians research and write about art using appropriate discipline-based methods (i.e., historical, critical, and aesthetic). This course may incorporate hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.

GENERAL NOTES

Special Notes:
Instructional Practices

Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students’ content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, textspecific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 0100340 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Art - Visual Arts > SubSubject: Art Appreciation/History/Criticism >
Abbreviated Title: ART HIST & CRIT 2 H
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
  • Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Core Academic Course Course Level: 3
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12,30,31
Graduation Requirement: Performing/Fine Arts



Educator Certifications

Art Education (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Humanities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Art (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


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