Humane Letters 3 History (#2109344) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.912.A.1.1: Describe the importance of historiography, which includes how historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted, when interpreting events in history.
SS.912.A.1.2: Utilize a variety of primary and secondary sources to identify author, historical significance, audience, and authenticity to understand a historical period.
Clarifications:
Examples of primary and secondary sources may be found on various websites such as the site for The Kinsey Collection.
SS.912.A.1.3: Utilize timelines to identify the time sequence of historical data.
SS.912.A.1.6: Use case studies to explore social, political, legal, and economic relationships in history.
SS.912.A.3.10: Review different economic and philosophic ideologies.
Clarifications:
Economic examples may include, but are not limited to, market economy, mixed economy, planned economy and philosophic examples are capitalism, socialism, communism, anarchy.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.H.1.4: Explain philosophical beliefs as they relate to works in the arts.
Clarifications:
Examples are classical architecture, protest music, Native American dance, Japanese Noh.
SS.912.H.2.3: Apply various types of critical analysis (contextual, formal, and intuitive criticism) to works in the arts, including the types and use of symbolism within art forms and their philosophical implications.
SS.912.H.2.4: Examine the effects that works in the arts have on groups, individuals, and cultures.
SS.912.H.3.1: Analyze the effects of transportation, trade, communication, science, and technology on the preservation and diffusion of culture.
SS.912.P.8.2: Discuss the relationship between language and thought.
SS.912.P.10.2: Identify how cultures change over time and vary within nations and internationally.
SS.912.P.10.3: Discuss the relationship between culture and conceptions of self and identity.
SS.912.S.2.1: Define the key components of a culture, such as knowledge, language and communication, customs, values, norms, and physical objects.
SS.912.S.2.9: Prepare original written and oral reports and presentations on specific events, people or historical eras.
SS.912.S.3.3: Examine and analyze various points of view relating to historical and current events.
SS.912.S.5.1: Identify basic social institutions and explain their impact on individuals, groups and organizations within society and how they transmit the values of society.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, familial, religious, educational, economic, and political institutions.
SS.912.S.6.1: Describe how and why societies change over time.
SS.912.S.6.8: Investigate the consequences in society as result of changes.
SS.912.W.1.1: Use timelines to establish cause and effect relationships of historical events.
SS.912.W.1.2: Compare time measurement systems used by different cultures.
Clarifications:
Examples are Chinese, Gregorian, and Islamic calendars, dynastic periods, decade, century, era.
SS.912.W.1.3: Interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources.
Clarifications:
Examples are artifacts, images, auditory and written sources.
SS.912.W.1.4: Explain how historians use historical inquiry and other sciences to understand the past.
Clarifications:
Examples are archaeology, economics, geography, forensic chemistry, political science, physics.
SS.912.W.1.5: Compare conflicting interpretations or schools of thought about world events and individual contributions to history (historiography).
SS.912.W.1.6: Evaluate the role of history in shaping identity and character.
Clarifications:
Examples are ethnic, cultural, personal, national, religious.
MA.K12.MTR.1.1: Actively participate in effortful learning both individually and collectively.  

Mathematicians who participate in effortful learning both individually and with others: 

  • Analyze the problem in a way that makes sense given the task. 
  • Ask questions that will help with solving the task. 
  • Build perseverance by modifying methods as needed while solving a challenging task. 
  • Stay engaged and maintain a positive mindset when working to solve tasks. 
  • Help and support each other when attempting a new method or approach.

 

Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to participate actively in effortful learning both individually and with others:
  • Cultivate a community of growth mindset learners. 
  • Foster perseverance in students by choosing tasks that are challenging. 
  • Develop students’ ability to analyze and problem solve. 
  • Recognize students’ effort when solving challenging problems.
MA.K12.MTR.2.1: Demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways.  

Mathematicians who demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways:  

  • Build understanding through modeling and using manipulatives.
  • Represent solutions to problems in multiple ways using objects, drawings, tables, graphs and equations.
  • Progress from modeling problems with objects and drawings to using algorithms and equations.
  • Express connections between concepts and representations.
  • Choose a representation based on the given context or purpose.
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways: 
  • Help students make connections between concepts and representations.
  • Provide opportunities for students to use manipulatives when investigating concepts.
  • Guide students from concrete to pictorial to abstract representations as understanding progresses.
  • Show students that various representations can have different purposes and can be useful in different situations. 
MA.K12.MTR.3.1: Complete tasks with mathematical fluency. 

Mathematicians who complete tasks with mathematical fluency:

  • Select efficient and appropriate methods for solving problems within the given context.
  • Maintain flexibility and accuracy while performing procedures and mental calculations.
  • Complete tasks accurately and with confidence.
  • Adapt procedures to apply them to a new context.
  • Use feedback to improve efficiency when performing calculations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to complete tasks with mathematical fluency:
  • Provide students with the flexibility to solve problems by selecting a procedure that allows them to solve efficiently and accurately.
  • Offer multiple opportunities for students to practice efficient and generalizable methods.
  • Provide opportunities for students to reflect on the method they used and determine if a more efficient method could have been used. 
MA.K12.MTR.4.1: Engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others. 

Mathematicians who engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:

  • Communicate mathematical ideas, vocabulary and methods effectively.
  • Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.
  • Compare the efficiency of a method to those expressed by others.
  • Recognize errors and suggest how to correctly solve the task.
  • Justify results by explaining methods and processes.
  • Construct possible arguments based on evidence. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:
  • Establish a culture in which students ask questions of the teacher and their peers, and error is an opportunity for learning.
  • Create opportunities for students to discuss their thinking with peers.
  • Select, sequence and present student work to advance and deepen understanding of correct and increasingly efficient methods.
  • Develop students’ ability to justify methods and compare their responses to the responses of their peers. 
MA.K12.MTR.5.1: Use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts. 

Mathematicians who use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:

  • Focus on relevant details within a problem.
  • Create plans and procedures to logically order events, steps or ideas to solve problems.
  • Decompose a complex problem into manageable parts.
  • Relate previously learned concepts to new concepts.
  • Look for similarities among problems.
  • Connect solutions of problems to more complicated large-scale situations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:
  • Help students recognize the patterns in the world around them and connect these patterns to mathematical concepts.
  • Support students to develop generalizations based on the similarities found among problems.
  • Provide opportunities for students to create plans and procedures to solve problems.
  • Develop students’ ability to construct relationships between their current understanding and more sophisticated ways of thinking.
MA.K12.MTR.6.1: Assess the reasonableness of solutions. 

Mathematicians who assess the reasonableness of solutions: 

  • Estimate to discover possible solutions.
  • Use benchmark quantities to determine if a solution makes sense.
  • Check calculations when solving problems.
  • Verify possible solutions by explaining the methods used.
  • Evaluate results based on the given context. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to assess the reasonableness of solutions:
  • Have students estimate or predict solutions prior to solving.
  • Prompt students to continually ask, “Does this solution make sense? How do you know?”
  • Reinforce that students check their work as they progress within and after a task.
  • Strengthen students’ ability to verify solutions through justifications. 
MA.K12.MTR.7.1: Apply mathematics to real-world contexts. 

Mathematicians who apply mathematics to real-world contexts:

  • Connect mathematical concepts to everyday experiences.
  • Use models and methods to understand, represent and solve problems.
  • Perform investigations to gather data or determine if a method is appropriate. • Redesign models and methods to improve accuracy or efficiency. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to apply mathematics to real-world contexts:
  • Provide opportunities for students to create models, both concrete and abstract, and perform investigations.
  • Challenge students to question the accuracy of their models and methods.
  • Support students as they validate conclusions by comparing them to the given situation.
  • Indicate how various concepts can be applied to other disciplines.
ELA.K12.EE.1.1: Cite evidence to explain and justify reasoning.
Clarifications:
K-1 Students include textual evidence in their oral communication with guidance and support from adults. The evidence can consist of details from the text without naming the text. During 1st grade, students learn how to incorporate the evidence in their writing.

2-3 Students include relevant textual evidence in their written and oral communication. Students should name the text when they refer to it. In 3rd grade, students should use a combination of direct and indirect citations.

4-5 Students continue with previous skills and reference comments made by speakers and peers. Students cite texts that they’ve directly quoted, paraphrased, or used for information. When writing, students will use the form of citation dictated by the instructor or the style guide referenced by the instructor. 

6-8 Students continue with previous skills and use a style guide to create a proper citation.

9-12 Students continue with previous skills and should be aware of existing style guides and the ways in which they differ.

ELA.K12.EE.2.1: Read and comprehend grade-level complex texts proficiently.
Clarifications:
See Text Complexity for grade-level complexity bands and a text complexity rubric.
ELA.K12.EE.3.1: Make inferences to support comprehension.
Clarifications:
Students will make inferences before the words infer or inference are introduced. Kindergarten students will answer questions like “Why is the girl smiling?” or make predictions about what will happen based on the title page. Students will use the terms and apply them in 2nd grade and beyond.
ELA.K12.EE.4.1: Use appropriate collaborative techniques and active listening skills when engaging in discussions in a variety of situations.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten, students learn to listen to one another respectfully.

In grades 1-2, students build upon these skills by justifying what they are thinking. For example: “I think ________ because _______.” The collaborative conversations are becoming academic conversations.

In grades 3-12, students engage in academic conversations discussing claims and justifying their reasoning, refining and applying skills. Students build on ideas, propel the conversation, and support claims and counterclaims with evidence.

ELA.K12.EE.5.1: Use the accepted rules governing a specific format to create quality work.
Clarifications:
Students will incorporate skills learned into work products to produce quality work. For students to incorporate these skills appropriately, they must receive instruction. A 3rd grade student creating a poster board display must have instruction in how to effectively present information to do quality work.
ELA.K12.EE.6.1: Use appropriate voice and tone when speaking or writing.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten and 1st grade, students learn the difference between formal and informal language. For example, the way we talk to our friends differs from the way we speak to adults. In 2nd grade and beyond, students practice appropriate social and academic language to discuss texts.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

Humane Letters 3 - History is an integrated blending of History and Literature that focuses on the civilization, thought, and legacy of ancient Greece. Emphasizing the classical approach to teaching and learning, this course fosters reading, discussion, and writing based on great works from Ancient Greece. This course is designed to be paired with Humane Letters 3 - Literature.

Students study the emergence of Greek civilization from an oral to a literary culture.  They witness the historical effects of literacy as it generates the first surviving documents of historiography and comparative ethnography, while seeing first-hand how new ideas emerge from geo-political competition and the intellectual ferment enabled by the dissemination of texts throughout the Mediterranean.  By following the emergence of seminal ideas in history, politics, theology, philosophy, drama, and epic poetry, students will sharpen their abilities to distinguish between historical events and the social significance invested in interpretations of these events.  The emergence of the philosophical tradition provides an opportunity to reflect upon the nature and value of the theoretical outlook.  Recommended texts for this course include, but are not limited to: Iliad, Herodotus’ Histories, Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War, Antigone, Crito, Apology, Republic, Nicomachean Ethics.

Humane Letters 3 – History Learning Outcomes:

  •        Outline the ways in which ideas from Greek history, politics, philosophy, and literature continue to influence Western culture.
  •        Compare and contrast mythological and historical ways of relating to one’s cultural past.
  •        Compare and contrast the conditions and characteristics of oral culture with literary culture.
  •        Discuss the nature of education in an oral society and the role of Homer’s epic poetry.
  •        Describe the ideals of virtue seen in Homer (Homeric ethics), and compare these to later historical developments.
  •        Use Herodotus to discuss the motivations, methods, and conventions visible in the birth of Greek historiography and ethnography.
  •        Discuss the causes, significant events, and effects of the Persian wars and their relation to the prominence of Athens and Sparta among the Greek poleis.
  •        Describe the differences in approach and method which contrast Herodotus’ and Thucydides’ historiography.
  •        Analyze Thucydides description of the cause of the Peloponnesian wars, and explain how it embodies a conflict between the differing ideals of Athens and Sparta.
  •        Describe the social role of Greek tragedy and give examples of how it exemplifies the Greek attitude towards divinity.
  •        Compare and contrast ancient monotheism and ancient polytheism as evidenced among the Greeks
  •        Contrast the modern, aesthetic approach to Greek tragedy as “works of Art” with the original social and religious context of Greek drama; compare this to theories of artistic representation in Plato and/or Aristotle
  •        Describe the ways in which Greek tragedy approaches virtue and happiness (tragic ethics) and compare this to later and earlier instantiations of ethics
  •        Contrast the ancient Greek notion of “piety” in Euthyphro and Apology with the modern conception.
  •        Outline Meno’s description of learning and knowledge and lay out the apparent paradox regarding the possibility of education
  •        Use Pericles’ ‘funeral oration,’ Antigone, and Plato’s Republic to consider the social roles and challenges for women in ancient Greece.
  •        Discuss the relationship of the argument in Plato’s Crito to later European ideas regarding the ‘rule of law’ and ‘social contract theory’.
  •        Describe the purpose of philosophy, according to Apology, and be prepared to defend or critique it
  •        Relate the four ‘cardinal’ virtues found in Republic to previous conceptions of virtue in Homer and tragedy and to Aristotle’s subsequent conception of ‘ethics’ in Nicomachean Ethics.
  •        Distinguish between three types of political systems in evidence among the Greeks, and discuss Republic’s critique of each.
  •        Discuss the interrelation between freedom, tyranny, happiness, goodness, justice, virtue, and vice in relation to Greek politics and philosophy, and compare this network of concepts with later moments in Western civilization.
  •        Analyze how the democratic concepts developed in ancient Greece have influenced and continue to influence the United States’ federal republic.

GENERAL NOTES

Instructional Practices

The recommended primary mode of instruction in Humane Letters is the seminar, supplemented with direct instruction through lecture or coaching. The seminar format requires that students participate actively in their search for the fullest understanding of the texts under examination. While the instructor serves as a guide in the learning process, the students and the instructor together investigate and explore the many complex ideas presented in the texts. Students are expected to follow these rules governing the seminar format:

  • Students must come to class having read the assignment in its entirety before they can participate in seminar discussion
  • Students must mentally prepare serious questions for the class to consider during discussion.
  • Each student must attend fully to the discussion at hand and refrain from carrying on side discussions.
  • Students must limit their comments only to the selection assigned for homework, or previously discussed passages.
  • Students must support their observations, arguments, or claims with specific textual evidence.

 Literacy Standards in Social Studies

Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 2109344 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Social Studies > SubSubject: World and Eastern Hemispheric Histories >
Abbreviated Title: HUM LET 3 HISTORY
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 11
Graduation Requirement: Electives



Educator Certifications

Political Science (Grades 6-12)
History (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)


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