Visions and Countervisions: Europe, U.S. and the World from 1848 Honors (#2100480) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.912.A.1.1: Describe the importance of historiography, which includes how historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted, when interpreting events in history.
SS.912.A.1.2: Utilize a variety of primary and secondary sources to identify author, historical significance, audience, and authenticity to understand a historical period.
Clarifications:
Examples of primary and secondary sources may be found on various websites such as the site for The Kinsey Collection.
SS.912.A.1.3: Utilize timelines to identify the time sequence of historical data.
SS.912.A.1.4: Analyze how images, symbols, objects, cartoons, graphs, charts, maps, and artwork may be used to interpret the significance of time periods and events from the past.
SS.912.A.1.5: Evaluate the validity, reliability, bias, and authenticity of current events and Internet resources.
Clarifications:

Students should be encouraged to utilize FINDS (Focus, Investigate, Note, Develop, Score), Florida's research process model accessible at:  http://www.fldoe.org/bii/library_media/pdf/12totalfinds.pdf

 

SS.912.A.1.6: Use case studies to explore social, political, legal, and economic relationships in history.
SS.912.A.1.7: Describe various socio-cultural aspects of American life including arts, artifacts, literature, education, and publications.
SS.912.A.2.1: Review causes and consequences of the Civil War.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, slavery, states' rights, territorial claims, abolitionist movement, regional differences, Reconstruction, 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is assessed view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.2.2: Assess the influence of significant people or groups on Reconstruction.
Clarifications:

Examples may include, but are not limited to, Alexander H. Stephens, Andrew Johnson, carpetbaggers, Charles Sumner, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frederick Douglass, Hiram Revels, Hiram Rhodes Revels, Jefferson Davis, Ku Klux Klan, Oliver O. Howard, Radical Republicans, Rutherford B. Hayes, scalawags, Thaddeus Stevens, Ulysses S. Grant, and William T. Sherman.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.2.3: Describe the issues that divided Republicans during the early Reconstruction era.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, southern whites, blacks, black legislators and white extremist organizations such as the KKK, Knights of the White Camellia, The White League, Red Shirts, and Pale Faces.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.2.4: Distinguish the freedoms guaranteed to African Americans and other groups with the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, abolition of slavery, citizenship, suffrage, equal protection.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.2.5: Assess how Jim Crow Laws influenced life for African Americans and other racial/ethnic minority groups.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.2.6: Compare the effects of the Black Codes and the Nadir on freed people, and analyze the sharecropping system and debt peonage as practiced in the United States.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.2.7: Review the Native American experience.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, westward expansion, reservation system, the Dawes Act, Wounded Knee Massacre, Sand Creek Massacre, Battle of Little Big Horn, Indian Schools, government involvement in the killing of the buffalo.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 19-21. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.3.1:
Analyze the economic challenges to American farmers and farmers' responses to these challenges in the mid to late 1800s.

Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

Examples may include, but are not limited to, creation of agricultural colleges, Morrill Land Grant Act, gold standard and Bimetallism, the creation of the Populist Party.

 

SS.912.A.3.2: Examine the social, political, and economic causes, course, and consequences of the second Industrial Revolution that began in the late 19th century.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.3.3: Compare the first and second Industrial Revolutions in the United States.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

Examples may include, but are not limited to, trade, development of new industries.
SS.912.A.3.4: Determine how the development of steel, oil, transportation, communication, and business practices affected the United States economy.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, railroads, the telegraph, pools, holding companies, trusts, corporations, contributed to westward expansion, expansion of trade and development of new industries, vertical and horizontal integration.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.5: Identify significant inventors of the Industrial Revolution including African Americans and women.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Lewis Howard Latimer, Jan E. Matzeliger, Sarah E. Goode, Granville T. Woods, Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, George Pullman, Henry Ford, Orville and Wilbur Wright, Elijah McCoy, Garrett Morgan, Madame C.J. Walker, George Westinghouse.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.6: Analyze changes that occurred as the United States shifted from agrarian to an industrial society.
Clarifications:

Examples may include, but are not limited to, Social Darwinism, laissez-faire, government regulations of food and drugs, migration to cities, urbanization, changes to the family structure, Ellis Island, angel Island, push-pull factors.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.3.7: Compare the experience of European immigrants in the east to that of Asian immigrants in the west (the Chinese Exclusion Act, Gentlemen's Agreement with Japan).
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to nativism, integration of immigrants into society when comparing "Old" [before 1890] and "New" immigrants [after 1890], Immigration Act of 1924.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 23-26. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.8: Examine the importance of social change and reform in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (class system, migration from farms to cities, Social Gospel movement, role of settlement houses and churches in providing services to the poor).
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.9: Examine causes, course, and consequences of the labor movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, unions, Knights of Labor, American Federation of Labor, Socialist Party, labor laws.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.3.10: Review different economic and philosophic ideologies.
Clarifications:
Economic examples may include, but are not limited to, market economy, mixed economy, planned economy and philosophic examples are capitalism, socialism, communism, anarchy.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.11: Analyze the impact of political machines in United States cities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Boss Tweed, Tammany Hall, George Washington Plunkitt, Washington Gladden, Thomas Nast.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.3.12: Compare how different nongovernmental organizations and progressives worked to shape public policy, restore economic opportunities, and correct injustices in American life.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, NAACP, YMCA, Women's Christian Temperance Union, National Women's Suffrage Association, National Women's Party, Robert LaFollette, Florence Kelley, Ida M. Tarbell, Eugene Debs, Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, Theodore Roosevelt, William Taft, Woodrow Wilson, Upton Sinclair, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Gifford Pinchot, William Jennings Bryan.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.3.13: Examine key events and peoples in Florida history as they relate to United States history.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the railroad industry, bridge construction in the Florida Keys, the cattle industry, the cigar industry, the influence of Cuban, Greek and Italian immigrants, Henry B. Plant, William Chipley, Henry Flagler, George Proctor, Thomas DeSaille Tucker, Hamilton Disston.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.1: Analyze the major factors that drove United States imperialism.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny, The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, Turner's Thesis, the Roosevelt Corollary, natural resources, markets for resources, elimination of spheres of influence in China.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 27-28. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.4.2: Explain the motives of the United States acquisition of the territories.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to,  Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Philippines, Guam, Samoa, Marshall Islands, Midway Island, Virgin Islands.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 27-28. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.3: Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Spanish American War.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Cuba as a protectorate, Yellow Journalism, sinking of the Maine, the Philippines, Commodore Dewey, the Rough Riders, acquisition of territories, the Treaty of Paris.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 27-28. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.4: Analyze the economic, military, and security motivations of the United States to complete the Panama Canal as well as major obstacles involved in its construction.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, disease, environmental impact, challenges faced by various ethnic groups such as Africans and indigenous populations, shipping routes, increased trade, defense and independence for Panama.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 27-28. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.5: Examine causes, course, and consequences of United States involvement in World War I.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, nationalism, imperialism, militarism, entangling alliances vs. neutrality, Zimmerman Note, the Lusitania, the Selective Service Act, the homefront, the American Expeditionary Force, Wilson's Fourteen Points, the Treaty of Versailles (and opposition to it), isolationism.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.4.6: Examine how the United States government prepared the nation for war with war measures (Selective Service Act, War Industries Board, war bonds, Espionage Act, Sedition Act, Committee of Public Information).
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.7: Examine the impact of airplanes, battleships, new weaponry and chemical warfare in creating new war strategies (trench warfare, convoys).
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.8: Compare the experiences Americans (African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, women, conscientious objectors) had while serving in Europe.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.9: Compare how the war impacted German Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Jewish Americans, Native Americans, women and dissenters in the United States.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.10: Examine the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles and the failure of the United States to support the League of Nations.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, self-determination, boundaries, demilitarized zone, sanctions reparations, and the League of Nations (including Article X of the Covenant).

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.4.11: Examine key events and peoples in Florida history as they relate to United States history.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the Spanish-American War, Ybor City, Jose Marti.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 29-31. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.1: Discuss the economic outcomes of demobilization.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 32-33. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.5.2: Explain the causes of the public reaction (Sacco and Vanzetti, labor, racial unrest) associated with the Red Scare.
Clarifications:
Examples may also include, but are not limited to, Palmer Raids, FBI, J. Edgar Hoover.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.3: Examine the impact of United States foreign economic policy during the 1920s.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the Depression of 1920-21, "The Business of America is Business," assembly line, installment buying, consumerism.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 32-33. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.4: Evaluate how the economic boom during the Roaring Twenties changed consumers, businesses, manufacturing, and marketing practices.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 37-39. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.5.5: Describe efforts by the United States and other world powers to avoid future wars.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, League of Nations, Washington Naval Conference, London Conference, Kellogg-Briand Pact, the Nobel Prize.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 34. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.5.6: Analyze the influence that Hollywood, the Harlem Renaissance, the Fundamentalist movement, and prohibition had in changing American society in the 1920s.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.7: Examine the freedom movements that advocated civil rights for African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and women.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.8: Compare the views of Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, and Marcus Garvey relating to the African American experience.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.9: Explain why support for the Ku Klux Klan varied in the 1920s with respect to issues such as anti-immigration, anti-African American, anti-Catholic, anti-Jewish, anti-women, and anti-union ideas.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, 100 Percent Americanism.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.5.10: Analyze support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.5.11: Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Great Depression and the New Deal.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 37-39. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.5.12: Examine key events and people in Florida history as they relate to United States history.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Rosewood, land boom, speculation, impact of climate and natural disasters on the end of the land boom, invention of modern air conditioning in 1929, Alfred DuPont, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.1: Examine causes, course, and consequences of World War II on the United States and the world.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, rise of dictators, attack on Pearl Harbor, Nazi party, American neutrality, D-Day, Battle of the Bulge, War in the Pacific, internment camps, Holocaust, Yalta.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.6.2: Describe the United States response in the early years of World War II (Neutrality Acts, Cash and Carry, Lend Lease Act).
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.3: Analyze the impact of the Holocaust during World War II on Jews as well as other groups.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.4: Examine efforts to expand or contract rights for various populations during World War II.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, women, African Americans, German Americans, Japanese Americans and their internment, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Italian Americans.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.5: Explain the impact of World War II on domestic government policy.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, rationing, national security, civil rights, increased job opportunities for African Americans, women, Jews, and other refugees.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.6: Analyze the use of atomic weapons during World War II and the aftermath of the bombings.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.7: Describe the attempts to promote international justice through the Nuremberg Trials.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.8: Analyze the effects of the Red Scare on domestic United States policy.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, loyalty review program, House Un-American Activities Committee, McCarthyism (Sen. Joe McCarthy), McCarran Act.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.9: Describe the rationale for the formation of the United Nations, including the contribution of Mary McLeod Bethune.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the Declaration of Human Rights.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.10: Examine causes, course, and consequences of the early years of the Cold War (Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, NATO, Warsaw Pact).
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 43-44. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.6.11: Examine the controversy surrounding the proliferation of nuclear technology in the United States and the world.
Clarifications:

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 45-46. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.6.12: Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Korean War.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Communist China, 38th parallel, cease fire, firing of Gen. Douglas McArthur.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 45-46. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.6.13: Analyze significant foreign policy events during the Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the Domino Theory, Sputnik, space race, Korean Conflict, Vietnam Conflict, U-2 and Gary Powers, Bay of Pigs invasion, Cuban Missile Crisis, Berlin Wall, Ping Pong Diplomacy, opening of China.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 45-46. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.14: Analyze causes, course, and consequences of the Vietnam War.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not lmited to, Geneva Accords, Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, the draft, escalating protest at home, Vietnamization, the War Powers Act.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 45-46. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.6.15: Examine key events and peoples in Florida history as they relate to United States history.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Mosquito Fleet, "Double V Campaign", construction of military bases and WWII training centers, 1959 Cuban coup and its impact on Florida, development of the space program and NASA.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.1: Identify causes for Post-World War II prosperity and its effects on American society.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, G.I. Bill, Baby Boom, growth of suburbs, Beatnik movement, youth culture, religious revivalism (e.g., Billy Graham and Bishop Fulton J. Sheen), conformity of the 1950s and the protest in the 1960s.  

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 47-48. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.7.2: Compare the relative prosperity between different ethnic groups and social classes in the post-World War II period.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 47-48. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.3: Examine the changing status of women in the United States from post-World War II to present.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, increased numbers of women in the workforce, Civil Rights Act of 1964, The Feminine Mystique, National Organization for Women, Roe v. Wade, Equal Rights Amendment, Title IX, Betty Freidan, Gloria Steinem, Phyllis Schlafly, Billie Jean King, feminism.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 47-48. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.4: Evaluate the success of 1960s era presidents' foreign and domestic policies.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, civil rights legislation, Space Race, Great Society, War on Poverty.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 49-50. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.7.5: Compare nonviolent and violent approaches utilized by groups (African Americans, women, Native Americans, Hispanics) to achieve civil rights.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, sit-ins, Freedom Rides, boycotts, riots, protest marches.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 51-52. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.6: Assess key figures and organizations in shaping the Civil Rights Movement and Black Power Movement.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the NAACP, National Urban League, SNCC, CORE, James Farmer, Charles Houston, Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, Constance Baker Motley, the Little Rock Nine, Roy Wilkins, Whitney M. Young, A. Philip Randolph, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert F. Williams, Fannie Lou Hamer, Malcolm X [El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz], Stokely Carmichael [Kwame Ture], H. Rap Brown [Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin], the Black Panther Party [e.g., Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale].

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 51-52. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.7.7: Assess the building of coalitions between African Americans, whites, and other groups in achieving integration and equal rights.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Freedom Summer, Freedom Rides, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Tallahassee Bus Boycott of 1956, March on Washington.  

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 51-52. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.8: Analyze significant Supreme Court decisions relating to integration, busing, affirmative action, the rights of the accused, and reproductive rights.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Plessy v. Ferguson [1896], Brown v. Board of Education [1954], Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education [1971], Regents of the University of California v. Bakke [1978], Miranda v. Arizona [1966], Gideon v. Wainwright [1963], Mapp v. Ohio [1961], and Roe v. Wade [1973].

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 53-54. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.7.9: Examine the similarities of social movements (Native Americans, Hispanics, women, anti-war protesters) of the 1960s and 1970s.
SS.912.A.7.10: Analyze the significance of Vietnam and Watergate on the government and people of the United States.
Clarifications:

Examples may include, but are not limited to, mistrust of government, reinforcement of freedom of the press, as well as checks and balances. Examples may include, but are not limited to, mistrust of government and reinforcement of freedom of the press.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 49-50. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.11: Analyze the foreign policy of the United States as it relates to Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Haiti, Bosnia-Kosovo, Rwanda, Grenada, Camp David Accords, Iran Hostage Crisis, Lebanon, Iran-Iraq War, Reagan Doctrine, Iran-Contra Affair, Persian Gulf War.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 55-56. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.7.12: Analyze political, economic, and social concerns that emerged at the end of the 20th century and into the 21st century.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, AIDS, Green Revolution, outsourcing of jobs, global warming, human rights violations.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 57-59. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.13: Analyze the attempts to extend New Deal legislation through the Great Society and the successes and failures of these programs to promote social and economic stability.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Voting Rights Act of 1965, War on Poverty, Medicare, Medicaid, Headstart.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 49-50 and pages 57-59. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.7.14: Review the role of the United States as a participant in the global economy (trade agreements, international competition, impact on American labor, environmental concerns).
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, NAFTA, World Trade Organization.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 57-59. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

SS.912.A.7.15: Analyze the effects of foreign and domestic terrorism on the American people.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Oklahoma City bombing, attack of September 11, 2001, Patriot Act, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 57-59. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.16: Examine changes in immigration policy and attitudes toward immigration since 1950.
Clarifications:
This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 57-59. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.A.7.17: Examine key events and key people in Florida history as they relate to United States history.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, selection of Central Florida as a location for Disney, growth of the citrus and cigar industries, construction of Interstates, Harry T. Moore, Pork Chop Gang, Claude Pepper, changes in the space program, use of DEET, Hurricane Andrew, the Election of 2000, migration and immigration, Sunbelt state.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 47-52 and pages 57-59. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.G.1.1: Design maps using a variety of technologies based on descriptive data to explain physical and cultural attributes of major world regions.
SS.912.G.1.2: Use spatial perspective and appropriate geographic terms and tools, including the Six Essential Elements, as organizational schema to describe any given place.
SS.912.G.1.3: Employ applicable units of measurement and scale to solve simple locational problems using maps and globes.
SS.912.G.1.4: Analyze geographic information from a variety of sources including primary sources, atlases, computer, and digital sources, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and a broad variety of maps.
Clarifications:
Examples are thematic, contour, and dot-density.
SS.912.G.2.1: Identify the physical characteristics and the human characteristics that define and differentiate regions.

Clarifications:
Examples of physical characteristics are climate, terrain, resources. 

Examples of human characteristics are religion, government, economy, demography.

SS.912.G.2.2: Describe the factors and processes that contribute to the differences between developing and developed regions of the world.
SS.912.G.2.3: Use geographic terms and tools to analyze case studies of regional issues in different parts of the world that have critical economic, physical, or political ramifications.
Clarifications:
Examples are desertification, global warming, cataclysmic natural disasters.
SS.912.G.4.1: Interpret population growth and other demographic data for any given place.
SS.912.G.4.2: Use geographic terms and tools to analyze the push/pull factors contributing to human migration within and among places.
SS.912.G.4.3: Use geographic terms and tools to analyze the effects of migration both on the place of origin and destination, including border areas.
SS.912.G.4.7: Use geographic terms and tools to explain cultural diffusion throughout places, regions, and the world.
SS.912.G.4.9: Use political maps to describe the change in boundaries and governments within continents over time.
SS.912.H.1.4: Explain philosophical beliefs as they relate to works in the arts.
Clarifications:
Examples are classical architecture, protest music, Native American dance, Japanese Noh.
SS.912.H.3.1: Analyze the effects of transportation, trade, communication, science, and technology on the preservation and diffusion of culture.
SS.912.H.3.2: Identify social, moral, ethical, religious, and legal issues arising from technological and scientific developments, and examine their influence on works of arts within a culture.
SS.912.W.1.1: Use timelines to establish cause and effect relationships of historical events.
SS.912.W.1.2: Compare time measurement systems used by different cultures.
Clarifications:
Examples are Chinese, Gregorian, and Islamic calendars, dynastic periods, decade, century, era.
SS.912.W.1.3: Interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources.
Clarifications:
Examples are artifacts, images, auditory and written sources.
SS.912.W.1.4: Explain how historians use historical inquiry and other sciences to understand the past.
Clarifications:
Examples are archaeology, economics, geography, forensic chemistry, political science, physics.
SS.912.W.1.5: Compare conflicting interpretations or schools of thought about world events and individual contributions to history (historiography).
SS.912.W.1.6: Evaluate the role of history in shaping identity and character.
Clarifications:
Examples are ethnic, cultural, personal, national, religious.
SS.912.W.4.11: Summarize the causes that led to the Age of Exploration, and identify major voyages and sponsors.
MA.K12.MTR.1.1: Actively participate in effortful learning both individually and collectively.  

Mathematicians who participate in effortful learning both individually and with others: 

  • Analyze the problem in a way that makes sense given the task. 
  • Ask questions that will help with solving the task. 
  • Build perseverance by modifying methods as needed while solving a challenging task. 
  • Stay engaged and maintain a positive mindset when working to solve tasks. 
  • Help and support each other when attempting a new method or approach.

 

Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to participate actively in effortful learning both individually and with others:
  • Cultivate a community of growth mindset learners. 
  • Foster perseverance in students by choosing tasks that are challenging. 
  • Develop students’ ability to analyze and problem solve. 
  • Recognize students’ effort when solving challenging problems.
MA.K12.MTR.2.1: Demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways.  

Mathematicians who demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways:  

  • Build understanding through modeling and using manipulatives.
  • Represent solutions to problems in multiple ways using objects, drawings, tables, graphs and equations.
  • Progress from modeling problems with objects and drawings to using algorithms and equations.
  • Express connections between concepts and representations.
  • Choose a representation based on the given context or purpose.
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways: 
  • Help students make connections between concepts and representations.
  • Provide opportunities for students to use manipulatives when investigating concepts.
  • Guide students from concrete to pictorial to abstract representations as understanding progresses.
  • Show students that various representations can have different purposes and can be useful in different situations. 
MA.K12.MTR.3.1: Complete tasks with mathematical fluency. 

Mathematicians who complete tasks with mathematical fluency:

  • Select efficient and appropriate methods for solving problems within the given context.
  • Maintain flexibility and accuracy while performing procedures and mental calculations.
  • Complete tasks accurately and with confidence.
  • Adapt procedures to apply them to a new context.
  • Use feedback to improve efficiency when performing calculations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to complete tasks with mathematical fluency:
  • Provide students with the flexibility to solve problems by selecting a procedure that allows them to solve efficiently and accurately.
  • Offer multiple opportunities for students to practice efficient and generalizable methods.
  • Provide opportunities for students to reflect on the method they used and determine if a more efficient method could have been used. 
MA.K12.MTR.4.1: Engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others. 

Mathematicians who engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:

  • Communicate mathematical ideas, vocabulary and methods effectively.
  • Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.
  • Compare the efficiency of a method to those expressed by others.
  • Recognize errors and suggest how to correctly solve the task.
  • Justify results by explaining methods and processes.
  • Construct possible arguments based on evidence. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:
  • Establish a culture in which students ask questions of the teacher and their peers, and error is an opportunity for learning.
  • Create opportunities for students to discuss their thinking with peers.
  • Select, sequence and present student work to advance and deepen understanding of correct and increasingly efficient methods.
  • Develop students’ ability to justify methods and compare their responses to the responses of their peers. 
MA.K12.MTR.5.1: Use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts. 

Mathematicians who use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:

  • Focus on relevant details within a problem.
  • Create plans and procedures to logically order events, steps or ideas to solve problems.
  • Decompose a complex problem into manageable parts.
  • Relate previously learned concepts to new concepts.
  • Look for similarities among problems.
  • Connect solutions of problems to more complicated large-scale situations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:
  • Help students recognize the patterns in the world around them and connect these patterns to mathematical concepts.
  • Support students to develop generalizations based on the similarities found among problems.
  • Provide opportunities for students to create plans and procedures to solve problems.
  • Develop students’ ability to construct relationships between their current understanding and more sophisticated ways of thinking.
MA.K12.MTR.6.1: Assess the reasonableness of solutions. 

Mathematicians who assess the reasonableness of solutions: 

  • Estimate to discover possible solutions.
  • Use benchmark quantities to determine if a solution makes sense.
  • Check calculations when solving problems.
  • Verify possible solutions by explaining the methods used.
  • Evaluate results based on the given context. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to assess the reasonableness of solutions:
  • Have students estimate or predict solutions prior to solving.
  • Prompt students to continually ask, “Does this solution make sense? How do you know?”
  • Reinforce that students check their work as they progress within and after a task.
  • Strengthen students’ ability to verify solutions through justifications. 
MA.K12.MTR.7.1: Apply mathematics to real-world contexts. 

Mathematicians who apply mathematics to real-world contexts:

  • Connect mathematical concepts to everyday experiences.
  • Use models and methods to understand, represent and solve problems.
  • Perform investigations to gather data or determine if a method is appropriate. • Redesign models and methods to improve accuracy or efficiency. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to apply mathematics to real-world contexts:
  • Provide opportunities for students to create models, both concrete and abstract, and perform investigations.
  • Challenge students to question the accuracy of their models and methods.
  • Support students as they validate conclusions by comparing them to the given situation.
  • Indicate how various concepts can be applied to other disciplines.
ELA.K12.EE.1.1: Cite evidence to explain and justify reasoning.
Clarifications:
K-1 Students include textual evidence in their oral communication with guidance and support from adults. The evidence can consist of details from the text without naming the text. During 1st grade, students learn how to incorporate the evidence in their writing.

2-3 Students include relevant textual evidence in their written and oral communication. Students should name the text when they refer to it. In 3rd grade, students should use a combination of direct and indirect citations.

4-5 Students continue with previous skills and reference comments made by speakers and peers. Students cite texts that they’ve directly quoted, paraphrased, or used for information. When writing, students will use the form of citation dictated by the instructor or the style guide referenced by the instructor. 

6-8 Students continue with previous skills and use a style guide to create a proper citation.

9-12 Students continue with previous skills and should be aware of existing style guides and the ways in which they differ.

ELA.K12.EE.2.1: Read and comprehend grade-level complex texts proficiently.
Clarifications:
See Text Complexity for grade-level complexity bands and a text complexity rubric.
ELA.K12.EE.3.1: Make inferences to support comprehension.
Clarifications:
Students will make inferences before the words infer or inference are introduced. Kindergarten students will answer questions like “Why is the girl smiling?” or make predictions about what will happen based on the title page. Students will use the terms and apply them in 2nd grade and beyond.
ELA.K12.EE.4.1: Use appropriate collaborative techniques and active listening skills when engaging in discussions in a variety of situations.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten, students learn to listen to one another respectfully.

In grades 1-2, students build upon these skills by justifying what they are thinking. For example: “I think ________ because _______.” The collaborative conversations are becoming academic conversations.

In grades 3-12, students engage in academic conversations discussing claims and justifying their reasoning, refining and applying skills. Students build on ideas, propel the conversation, and support claims and counterclaims with evidence.

ELA.K12.EE.5.1: Use the accepted rules governing a specific format to create quality work.
Clarifications:
Students will incorporate skills learned into work products to produce quality work. For students to incorporate these skills appropriately, they must receive instruction. A 3rd grade student creating a poster board display must have instruction in how to effectively present information to do quality work.
ELA.K12.EE.6.1: Use appropriate voice and tone when speaking or writing.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten and 1st grade, students learn the difference between formal and informal language. For example, the way we talk to our friends differs from the way we speak to adults. In 2nd grade and beyond, students practice appropriate social and academic language to discuss texts.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.912.C.2.4: Evaluate how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.
Clarifications:
Seat-belt enforcement, underage alcohol sales, reporting communicable diseases, child care, and AED availability.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Visions and Countervisions: Europe,the U.S. and the World from 1848 - The grade 9-12 Visions and Countervisions course consists of the following content area strands: World History, American History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the chronological study of major concepts and trends evidenced in the United States, Europe, and the world from 1848 to the present. Content should include, but is not limited to, the visions of revolution, nationalism, and imperialism evidenced in European history from 1848 to 1918, international politics from 1918 to 1945 emphasizing post-war Europe, cultural identities following nationalist and independent movements, the development and rise of communism, domestic issues affecting the United States from 1880 to the present, and the United States economic, political, and social policies and their effects on the world from 1898 to the present.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.


Instructional Practices
Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

 

Florida’s Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking (B.E.S.T.) Standards
This course includes Florida’s B.E.S.T. ELA Expectations (EE) and Mathematical Thinking and Reasoning Standards (MTRs) for students. Florida educators should intentionally embed these standards within the content and their instruction as applicable. For guidance on the implementation of the EEs and MTRs, please visit https://www.cpalms.org/Standards/BEST_Standards.aspx and select the appropriate B.E.S.T. Standards package.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 2100480 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Social Studies > SubSubject: American and Western Hemispheric Histories >
Abbreviated Title: VISIONS/COUNTER HON
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
  • Class Size Core Required
  • Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Core Academic Course Course Level: 3
Course Status: State Board Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12
Graduation Requirement: United States History



Educator Certifications

History (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)


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