Access United States Government  (#7921015) 

{ United States Government - 2106310 }


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.912.C.1.1: Evaluate, take, and defend positions on the founding ideals and principles in American Constitutional government.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.1.In.a: Identify the influence of founding principles in American government, such as civic participation and voting, representative legislative bodies, and rule of law.
SS.912.C.1.Su.a: Recognize the influence of founding principles in American government, such as civic participation and voting, representative legislative bodies, or rule of law.
SS.912.C.1.Pa.a: Recognize civic participation as a founding principle of American government.

SS.912.C.1.2: Explain how the Declaration of Independence reflected the political principles of popular sovereignty, social contract, natural rights, and individual rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.1.In.b: Identify principles of natural rights, individual rights, and government of the people (popular sovereignty) reflected in the Declaration of Independence.
SS.912.C.1.Su.b: Recognize principles of natural rights and government of the people reflected in the Declaration of Independence.
SS.912.C.1.Pa.b: Recognize government of the people as a principle of the Declaration of Independence.

SS.912.C.1.3: Evaluate the ideals and principles of the founding documents (Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Federalist Papers) that shaped American Democracy.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.1.In.c: Identify principles of natural rights, individual rights, and government of the people (popular sovereignty) reflected in the Declaration of Independence.
SS.912.C.1.Su.c: Recognize principles of natural rights and government of the people reflected in the Declaration of Independence.
SS.912.C.1.Pa.c: Recognize government of the people as a principle of the Declaration of Independence.

SS.912.C.1.4: Analyze and categorize the diverse viewpoints presented by the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists concerning ratification of the Constitution and inclusion of a bill of rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.1.In.d: Identify major debates and compromises in the process of writing and adopting the Constitution, such as plans developed by various states, the Great Compromise—the formation of the House and Senate, and the promise of the Bill of Rights.
SS.912.C.1.Su.d: Recognize that there were compromises in developing the Constitution, such as the Great Compromise—the formation of the House and Senate—and the promise of the Bill of Rights.
SS.912.C.1.Pa.d: Recognize that forming the American government involved a compromise.

SS.912.C.1.5: Evaluate how the Constitution and its amendments reflect the political principles of rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, republicanism, democracy, and federalism.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.1.In.e: Identify the importance of the political principles reflected in the Constitution, such as rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, and representative government (republicanism).
SS.912.C.1.Su.e: Recognize examples of practices that reflect political principles in the Constitution, such as representative government, respecting the law, and functions of the three branches of government.
SS.912.C.1.Pa.e: Recognize a practice that reflects government by the people (democracy) in the Constitution.

SS.912.C.2.1: Evaluate the constitutional provisions establishing citizenship, and assess the criteria among citizens by birth, naturalized citizens, and non-citizens.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.a: Describe the differences between a citizen and a noncitizen and ways people can become citizens of a country, such as by birth or naturalization.
SS.912.C.2.Su.a: Identify the differences between a citizen and a noncitizen.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.a: Recognize a difference between a citizen and a noncitizen.

SS.912.C.2.2: Evaluate the importance of political participation and civic participation.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.b: Identify examples of political participation and civic participation, such as registering to vote, keeping informed, communicating with elected officials, and participating in political campaigns.
SS.912.C.2.Su.b: Recognize examples of political participation and civic participation, such as registering to vote, keeping informed, communicating with elected officials, and participating in political campaigns.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.b: Recognize ways to participate in the political process.

SS.912.C.2.3: Experience the responsibilities of citizens at the local, state, or federal levels.
Clarifications:
Examples are registering or pre-registering to vote, volunteering, communicating with government officials, informing others about current issues, participating in a political campaign/mock election.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.c: Identify examples of political participation and civic participation, such as registering to vote, keeping informed, communicating with elected officials, and participating in political campaigns.
SS.912.C.2.Su.c: Recognize examples of political participation and civic participation, such as registering to vote, keeping informed, communicating with elected officials, and participating in political campaigns.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.c: Recognize ways to participate in the political process.

SS.912.C.2.4: Evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues that cause the government to balance the interests of individuals with the public good.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.d: Identify a position on issues that cause the government to balance the interests of individuals with the public good, such as for or against recycling, curfews, and building regulations.
SS.912.C.2.Su.d: Recognize a position on issues that cause the government to balance the interests of individuals with the public good, such as for or against recycling and curfews.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.d: Recognize an issue that causes the government to balance the interests of individuals with the public good, such as recycling.

SS.912.C.2.5: Conduct a service project to further the public good.
Clarifications:
Examples are school, community, state, national, international.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.e: Engage in a service project to further the public good, such as at school, community, state, and national levels.
SS.912.C.2.Su.e: Assist with a service project to further the public good, such as at school, community, state, and national levels.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.e: Participate in a service project to further the public good, such as at school, community, state, and national levels.

SS.912.C.2.6: Evaluate, take, and defend positions about rights protected by the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.f: Defend a position about individual rights protected by the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
SS.912.C.2.Su.f: Identify a position about individual rights protected by the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.f: Recognize an individual right protected by the Constitution.

SS.912.C.2.7: Explain why rights have limits and are not absolute.
Clarifications:
Examples are speech, search and seizure, religion, gun possession.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.g: Identify a reason why rights have limits and are not absolute, such as speech and gun possession.
SS.912.C.2.Su.g: Recognize that some rights are limited, such as speech or gun possession.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.g: Recognize that rights have limits.

SS.912.C.2.8: Analyze the impact of citizen participation as a means of achieving political and social change.
Clarifications:
Examples are e-mail campaigns, boycotts, blogs, podcasts, protests, demonstrations, letters to editors.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.Su.h: Recognize examples of citizen participation, such as demonstrations, protests, and letters to the editor, to achieve change.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.h: Recognize a demonstration or protest to achieve change.

SS.912.C.2.9: Identify the expansion of civil rights and liberties by examining the principles contained in primary documents.
Clarifications:
Examples are Preamble, Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Emancipation Proclamation, 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th Amendments, Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.i: Identify the expansion of civil rights as reflected in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and its amendments, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
SS.912.C.2.Su.i: Recognize the expansion of civil rights as reflected in the Constitution and its amendments.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.i: Recognize examples of civil rights.

SS.912.C.2.10: Monitor current public issues in Florida.
Clarifications:
Examples are On-line Sunshine, media, e-mails to government officials, political text messaging.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.j: Identify current public issues in Florida.
SS.912.C.2.Su.j: Recognize current public issues in Florida.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.j: Recognize a current public issue in Florida.

SS.912.C.2.11: Analyze public policy solutions or courses of action to resolve a local, state, or federal issue.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.k: Describe a solution to resolve a public issue.
SS.912.C.2.Su.k: Identify a solution to resolve a public issue.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.k: Recognize a solution to a public issue.

SS.912.C.2.12: Explain the changing roles of television, radio, press, and Internet in political communication.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.l: Identify the role of television, radio, the press, and the Internet in political communications.
SS.912.C.2.Su.l: Recognize the role of television, radio, and the press in political communications.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.l: Recognize forms of political communication, such as television, magazines, or newspapers.

SS.912.C.2.13: Analyze various forms of political communication and evaluate for bias, factual accuracy, omission, and emotional appeal.
Clarifications:
Examples are political cartoons, propaganda, campaign advertisements, political speeches, electronic bumper stickers, blogs, media.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.m: Identify various forms of political communication, such as campaign advertisements, political speech, and political cartoons, and identify their accuracy or emotional appeal.
SS.912.C.2.Su.m: Recognize a form of political communication, such as a campaign advertisement, political speech, or political cartoon, and identify its emotional appeal.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.m: Recognize forms of political communications, such as television, magazines, or newspapers.

SS.912.C.2.14: Evaluate the processes and results of an election at the state or federal level.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.n: Identify the process and results of an election.
SS.912.C.2.Su.n: Recognize the campaign, voting, and results of an election.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.n: Recognize voting and results of an election.

SS.912.C.2.15: Evaluate the origins and roles of political parties, interest groups, media, and individuals in determining and shaping public policy.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.o: Identify the role of political parties, special interest groups, and media in shaping public policy.
SS.912.C.2.Su.o: Identify the role of political parties and media in shaping public policy.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.o: Recognize that media influences government.

SS.912.C.2.16: Analyze trends in voter turnout.
Clarifications:
Examples are youth voter turnout, issue-based voting.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.2.In.p: Identify the process and results of an election.
SS.912.C.2.Su.p: Recognize the campaign, voting, and results of an election.
SS.912.C.2.Pa.p: Recognize voting and results of an election.

SS.912.C.3.1: Examine the constitutional principles of representative government, limited government, consent of the governed, rule of law, and individual rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.a: Identify principles of the Constitution that limit the power of the government, such as rule of law, individual rights, and consent of the governed.
SS.912.C.3.Su.a: Recognize principles of the Constitution that limit the power of the government, such as rule of law, individual rights, or consent of the governed.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.a: Recognize that the government has limits on its power.

SS.912.C.3.2: Define federalism, and identify examples of the powers granted and denied to states and the national government in the American federal system of government.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.b: Identify examples of the powers granted and denied states and the national government, such as the national government may not change state boundaries or violate the Bill of Rights and state governments may not print money or suspend a person’s rights without due process.
SS.912.C.3.Su.b: Recognize examples of the powers granted and denied states and the national government, such as the national government may not change state boundaries and state governments may not print money.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.b: Recognize an example of a power granted to the national government and not the state government, such as printing money.

SS.912.C.3.3: Analyze the structures, functions, and processes of the legislative branch as described in Article I of the Constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.c: Identify the structure and function of the legislative branch of the government identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Su.c: Identify the function of the legislative branch of the government identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.c: Recognize that the legislative branch of government creates laws.

SS.912.C.3.4: Analyze the structures, functions, and processes of the executive branch as described in Article II of the Constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.d: Identify the structure and functions of the executive branch of the government identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Su.d: Identify the function of the executive branch of the government identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.d: Recognize that the executive branch of government enforces laws.

SS.912.C.3.5: Identify the impact of independent regulatory agencies in the federal bureaucracy.
Clarifications:
Examples are Federal Reserve, Food and Drug Administration, Federal Communications Commission.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.e: Identify the purpose of independent regulatory agencies in the federal bureaucracy, such as the Federal Reserve (fiscal policy) and the Food and Drug Administration (ensures safety of food and drugs).
SS.912.C.3.Su.e: Recognize the purpose of an independent regulatory agency in the federal bureaucracy, such as the Food and Drug Administration (ensures safety of food and drugs).
SS.912.C.3.Pa.e: Recognize that federal agencies help people in America.

SS.912.C.3.6: Analyze the structures, functions, and processes of the judicial branch as described in Article III of the Constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.f: Identify the structure and function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Su.f: Identify the function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.f: Recognize that the judicial branch of government interprets laws.

SS.912.C.3.7: Describe the role of judicial review in American constitutional government.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.g: Identify the structure and function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Su.g: Identify the function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.g: Recognize that the judicial branch of government interprets laws.

SS.912.C.3.8: Compare the role of judges on the state and federal level with other elected officials.
Clarifications:
Examples are decisions based on the law vs. will of the majority.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.h: Identify the structure and function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Su.h: Identify the function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.h: Recognize that the judicial branch of government interprets laws.

SS.912.C.3.9: Analyze the various levels and responsibilities of courts in the federal and state judicial system and the relationships among them.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.i: Identify the levels of courts in the federal and state judicial system and their major responsibilities, such as criminal and civil cases and appeals.
SS.912.C.3.Su.i: Recognize different levels of courts in the judicial system, such as state and federal courts.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.i: Recognize that courts settle conflicts at the federal and state level.

SS.912.C.3.10: Evaluate the significance and outcomes of landmark Supreme Court cases.
Clarifications:
Examples are Marbury v. Madison, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Gideon v. Wainwright, Miranda v. Arizona, Tinker v. Des Moines, Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, United States v. Nixon, Roe v. Wade, Bush v. Gore, Texas v. Johnson, Mapp v. Ohio, McCulloch v. Maryland, District of Columbia v. Heller.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.j: Identify the importance of landmark Supreme Court cases, such as Plessy v. Ferguson, United States v. Nixon, and Roe v. Wade.
SS.912.C.3.Su.j: Recognize the importance of landmark Supreme Court cases, such as United States v. Nixon and Roe v. Wade.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.j: Recognize that Supreme Court cases have important outcomes that affect all citizens.

SS.912.C.3.11: Contrast how the Constitution safeguards and limits individual rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.k: Identify that the Constitution safeguards and limits rights.
SS.912.C.3.Su.k: Recognize that the Constitution safeguards and limits rights.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.k: Recognize that the government protects rights.

SS.912.C.3.12: Simulate the judicial decision-making process in interpreting law at the state and federal level.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.l: Identify the structure and function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Su.l: Identify the function of the judicial branch of the government as identified in the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.l: Recognize that the judicial branch of government interprets laws.

SS.912.C.3.13: Illustrate examples of how government affects the daily lives of citizens at the local, state, and national levels.
Clarifications:
Examples are education, transportation, crime prevention, funding of services.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.m: Identify the effects of government on the daily lives of citizens at the local, state, and national level.
SS.912.C.3.Su.m: Recognize an effect of government on the daily lives of citizens at the local, state, and national level.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.m: Recognize an effect of government on the daily lives of citizens.

SS.912.C.3.14: Examine constitutional powers (expressed, implied, concurrent, reserved).
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.n: Identify examples of the use of constitutional powers, such as being limited to the federal government, shared by both federal and state government, or limited to state governments.
SS.912.C.3.Su.n: Recognize examples of the use of constitutional powers, such as specifying powers of the federal and state governments.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.n: Recognize an example of a power granted to the national government and not the state government, such as printing money.

SS.912.C.3.15: Examine how power and responsibility are distributed, shared, and limited by the Constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.3.In.o: Identify examples of the use of constitutional powers, such as being limited to the federal government, shared by both federal and state government, or limited to state governments.
SS.912.C.3.Su.o: Recognize examples of the use of constitutional powers, such as specifying powers of the federal and state governments.
SS.912.C.3.Pa.o: Recognize an example of a power granted to the national government and not the state government, such as printing money.

SS.912.C.4.1: Explain how the world's nations are governed differently.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.4.In.a: Identify different forms of governments in other countries in the world.
SS.912.C.4.Su.a: Recognize a different form of government in another country in the world.
SS.912.C.4.Pa.a: Recognize that not all countries are governed like the United States.

SS.912.C.4.2: Evaluate the influence of American foreign policy on other nations and the influences of other nations on American policies and society.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.4.In.b: Identify the influence of American foreign policy on other nations.
SS.912.C.4.Su.b: Recognize an influence of American foreign policy on other nations.
SS.912.C.4.Pa.b: Recognize that the United States works with other nations.

SS.912.C.4.3: Assess human rights policies of the United States and other countries.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.4.In.c: Identify examples of human rights policies of the United States, such as the Bill of Rights.
SS.912.C.4.Su.c: Recognize examples of human rights policies of the United States, such as the Bill of Rights.
SS.912.C.4.Pa.c: Recognize a human right.

SS.912.C.4.4: Compare indicators of democratization in multiple countries.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.C.4.In.d: Identify common indicators of democratization, such as civil and political rights.
SS.912.C.4.Su.d: Recognize common indicators of democratization, such as civil or political rights.
SS.912.C.4.Pa.d: Recognize an example of democratization, such as human rights.

SS.912.G.4.1: Interpret population growth and other demographic data for any given place.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.G.4.In.a: Identify changes in population for selected places.
SS.912.G.4.Su.a: Recognize changes in population for selected places.
SS.912.G.4.Pa.a: Recognize that change is a characteristic of population.

SS.912.G.5.5: Use geographic terms and tools to analyze case studies of policies and programs for resource use and management.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.912.G.5.In.e: Use geographic terms and tools to identify effects of government policies or programs for resource use and management.
SS.912.G.5.Su.e: Use geographic terms and tools to recognize effects of government policies or programs for resource use and management.
SS.912.G.5.Pa.e: Recognize an impact of humans on an ecosystem.

LAFS.1112.RH.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
LAFS.1112.RH.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
LAFS.1112.RH.1.3 (Archived Standard): Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
LAFS.1112.RH.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
LAFS.1112.RH.2.5 (Archived Standard): Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.
LAFS.1112.RH.2.6 (Archived Standard): Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.
LAFS.1112.RH.3.7 (Archived Standard): Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
LAFS.1112.RH.3.8 (Archived Standard): Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.
LAFS.1112.RH.3.9 (Archived Standard): Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.
LAFS.1112.RH.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1b: Clarify, verify or challenge ideas and conclusions within a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1c: Summarize points of agreement and disagreement within a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1d: Use evidence and reasoning presented in discussion on topic or text to make new connections with own view or understanding.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1e: Work with peers to promote democratic discussions.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1f: Actively seek the ideas or opinions of others in a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1g: Engage appropriately in discussion with others who have a diverse or divergent perspectives.

LAFS.1112.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.2a: Analyze credibility of sources and accuracy of information presented in social media regarding a given topic or text.

LAFS.1112.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3a: Determine the speaker’s point of view or purpose in a text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3b: Determine what arguments the speaker makes.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3c: Evaluate the evidence used to make the speaker’s argument.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3d: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, use of evidence and rhetoric for ideas, relationship between claims, reasoning, evidence and word choice.

LAFS.1112.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.1112.SL.2.AP.4a: Report orally on a topic, with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details that support the main ideas.

LAFS.1112.WHST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
LAFS.1112.WHST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.1112.WHST.4.10 (Archived Standard): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.912.C.2.4: Evaluate how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.
Clarifications:
Seat-belt enforcement, underage alcohol sales, reporting communicable diseases, child care, and AED availability.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.912.C.2.In.d: Describe how public-health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention, such as enforcing seat-belt laws, preventing underage alcohol sales, and reporting communicable diseases.
HE.912.C.2.Su.d: Identify ways school and public-health policies can influence health promotion and disease prevention, such as enforcing seat-belt laws, preventing underage alcohol sales, and reporting communicable diseases.
HE.912.C.2.Pa.d: Recognize ways selected school and public-health policies can influence health promotion and disease prevention, such as enforcing seat-belt laws, preventing underage alcohol sales, and assessing health status.




General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf.

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection is provided by the Florida Association of School Administrators: http://www.fasa.net/4DCGI/cms/review.html?Action=CMS_Document&DocID=139. Please be aware that these resources have not been reviewed by CPALMS and there may be a charge for the use of some of them in this collection.


General Information

Course Number: 7921015 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Senior High and Adult > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS US GOVT
Number of Credits: Course may be taken for up to two credits
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12,30,31
Graduation Requirement: United States Government



Educator Certifications

Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 6-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Political Science (Grades 6-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus History (Grades 6-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 6-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Political Science (Grades 6-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
History (Grades 6-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 6-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Political Science (Grades 6-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus History (Grades 6-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 6-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9)
Political Science (Grades 6-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
History (Grades 6-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Science (Grades 5-9) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 6-12)
Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum (Middle Grades 5-9) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Political Science (Grades 6-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
History (Grades 6-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


There are more than 386 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/15519