Fundamental Integrated Science 1 (#7920030) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
SC.6.E.6.1: Describe and give examples of ways in which Earth's surface is built up and torn down by physical and chemical weathering, erosion, and deposition.
SC.6.E.6.2: Recognize that there are a variety of different landforms on Earth's surface such as coastlines, dunes, rivers, mountains, glaciers, deltas, and lakes and relate these landforms as they apply to Florida.
SC.6.E.7.1: Differentiate among radiation, conduction, and convection, the three mechanisms by which heat is transferred through Earth's system.
SC.6.L.14.2: Investigate and explain the components of the scientific theory of cells (cell theory): all organisms are composed of cells (single-celled or multi-cellular), all cells come from pre-existing cells, and cells are the basic unit of life.
SC.6.L.14.3: Recognize and explore how cells of all organisms undergo similar processes to maintain homeostasis, including extracting energy from food, getting rid of waste, and reproducing.
SC.6.L.14.4: Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.
SC.6.L.15.1: Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.
SC.7.L.16.1: Understand and explain that every organism requires a set of instructions that specifies its traits, that this hereditary information (DNA) contains genes located in the chromosomes of each cell, and that heredity is the passage of these instructions from one generation to another.
SC.7.L.16.2: Determine the probabilities for genotype and phenotype combinations using Punnett Squares and pedigrees.
SC.7.L.16.3: Compare and contrast the general processes of sexual reproduction requiring meiosis and asexual reproduction requiring mitosis.
SC.7.L.17.1: Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.
SC.8.L.18.1: Describe and investigate the process of photosynthesis, such as the roles of light, carbon dioxide, water and chlorophyll; production of food; release of oxygen.
SC.8.L.18.2: Describe and investigate how cellular respiration breaks down food to provide energy and releases carbon dioxide.
SC.8.P.8.1: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.
SC.8.P.8.4: Classify and compare substances on the basis of characteristic physical properties that can be demonstrated or measured; for example, density, thermal or electrical conductivity, solubility, magnetic properties, melting and boiling points, and know that these properties are independent of the amount of the sample.
SC.8.P.8.6: Recognize that elements are grouped in the periodic table according to similarities of their properties.
SC.8.P.8.7: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by recognizing that atoms are the smallest unit of an element and are composed of sub-atomic particles (electrons surrounding a nucleus containing protons and neutrons).
SC.8.P.8.8: Identify basic examples of and compare and classify the properties of compounds, including acids, bases, and salts.
SC.8.P.9.3: Investigate and describe how temperature influences chemical changes.
SC.912.L.17.4: Describe changes in ecosystems resulting from seasonal variations, climate change and succession.
SC.912.L.17.14: Assess the need for adequate waste management strategies.
SC.912.L.18.1: Describe the basic molecular structures and primary functions of the four major categories of biological macromolecules.
SC.912.L.18.7: Identify the reactants, products, and basic functions of photosynthesis.
SC.912.L.18.12: Discuss the special properties of water that contribute to Earth's suitability as an environment for life: cohesive behavior, ability to moderate temperature, expansion upon freezing, and versatility as a solvent.
SC.912.N.1.1: Define a problem based on a specific  body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following: 
  1. Pose questions about the natural world, (Articulate the purpose of the investigation and identify the relevant scientific concepts).
  2. Conduct systematic observations, (Write procedures that are clear and replicable. Identify observables and examine relationships between test (independent) variable and outcome (dependent) variable. Employ appropriate methods for accurate and consistent observations; conduct and record measurements at appropriate levels of precision. Follow safety guidelines).
  3. Examine books and other sources of information to see what is already known,
  4. Review what is known in light of empirical evidence, (Examine whether available empirical evidence can be interpreted in terms of existing knowledge and models, and if not, modify or develop new models).
  5. Plan investigations, (Design and evaluate a scientific investigation).
  6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs), (Collect data or evidence in an organized way. Properly use instruments, equipment, and materials (e.g., scales, probeware, meter sticks, microscopes, computers) including set-up, calibration, technique, maintenance, and storage).
  7. Pose answers, explanations, or descriptions of events,
  8. Generate explanations that explicate or describe natural phenomena (inferences),
  9. Use appropriate evidence and reasoning to justify these explanations to others,
  10. Communicate results of scientific investigations, and
  11. Evaluate the merits of the explanations produced by others.
SC.912.N.1.6: Describe how scientific inferences are drawn from scientific observations and provide examples from the content being studied.
SC.912.N.2.1: Identify what is science, what clearly is not science, and what superficially resembles science (but fails to meet the criteria for science).
SC.912.N.3.1: Explain that a scientific theory is the culmination of many scientific investigations drawing together all the current evidence concerning a substantial range of phenomena; thus, a scientific theory represents the most powerful explanation scientists have to offer.
SC.912.N.3.3: Explain that scientific laws are descriptions of specific relationships under given conditions in nature, but do not offer explanations for those relationships.
SC.912.N.3.4: Recognize that theories do not become laws, nor do laws become theories; theories are well supported explanations and laws are well supported descriptions.
ELD.K12.ELL.SC.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3).

Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).

Special Notes:

Instructional Strategies


  1. Utilize UDL strategies when planning lessons for all students.
  2. Ensure that students have accessible instructional materials.
  3. Ensure that students read from text that varies in length and complexity.
  4. Provide graphic organizers and instruct students on how to use them properly to support understanding of concepts.
  5. Use rubrics for assignments that clearly outline expectations for students.
  6. Make close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons and provide guided practice and immediate feedback in how to do this.
  7. Provide multiple opportunities to practice new vocabulary.
  8. Provide explicit instruction in how students can locate evidence from text to support their answers.
  9. Provide extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence) based on student interest.
  10. Provide students with outlines that assist them in note taking during teacher-led instruction.
  11. Teach students to utilize appropriate graphic organizers or organize thoughts when planning for writing assignments.

Literacy Standards in Science
Secondary science courses include reading standards for literacy in science and technical subjects 6-12 and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. The courses also include speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Science.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/sc.pdf.




General Information

Course Number: 7920030 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Senior High and Adult > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: FUND INTEG SCI 1
Course Status: Terminated



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