Access Social Studies - Grade 3 (#7721014) 

{ Social Studies Grade 3 - 5021050 }


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.3.A.1.1: Analyze primary and secondary sources.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, artifacts, photographs, paintings, maps, images, documents, audio and video recordings.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.A.1.In.a: Identify and use primary sources, such as artifacts and photographs, and secondary sources, such as texts and videos related to important historical figures or events.
SS.3.A.1.Su.a: Use primary or secondary sources, such as pictures, artifacts, or books, to identify important people or events from the past.
SS.3.A.1.Pa.a: Recognize important people or events in artifacts, videos, or photographs.

SS.3.A.1.2: Utilize technology resources to gather information from primary and secondary sources.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.A.1.In.b: Use technology resources to gather information about a historical person or event.
SS.3.A.1.Su.b: Use a technology resource to locate information about important people or events from the past.
SS.3.A.1.Pa.b: Use technology to access information.

SS.3.A.1.3: Define terms related to the social sciences.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, history, geography, civics, government, economics.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.A.1.In.c: Relate the term “history” to events from the past, “geography” to locations, and “economics” to money.
SS.3.A.1.Su.c: Recognize that history is about events from the past and geography is about places.
SS.3.A.1.Pa.c: Recognize concepts of time, such as morning and afternoon, and concepts of place, such as the location of an activity or event.

SS.3.C.1.1: Explain the purpose and need for government.
Clarifications:
Examples are safety, organization, services, protection of rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.1.In.a: Recognize the purpose of government in the community, such as to provide laws, services, and safety.
SS.3.C.1.Su.a: Recognize the purpose of rules and laws in the school and community, such as to promote safety, order, and good citizenship.
SS.3.C.1.Pa.a: Recognize rules in the school, such as respecting others.

SS.3.C.1.2: Describe how government gains its power from the people.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.1.In.b: Identify that government gains its power from the people.
SS.3.C.1.Su.b: Recognize that government gains its power from the people.
SS.3.C.1.Pa.b: Recognize that governments have power.

SS.3.C.1.3: Explain how government was established through a written Constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.1.In.c: Identify that government is based on a set of written laws that all people must follow.
SS.3.C.1.Su.c: Recognize that government is based on written laws.
SS.3.C.1.Pa.c: Recognize that governments have laws.

SS.3.C.2.1: Identify group and individual actions of citizens that demonstrate civility, cooperation, volunteerism, and other civic virtues.
Clarifications:
Examples are food drives, book drives, community, clean-up, voting.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.2.In.a: Identify actions of citizens that contribute to the community, such as respecting property, helping neighbors, and participating in community activities.
SS.3.C.2.Su.a: Recognize actions that contribute to the community, such as respecting property, helping neighbors, and participating in community activities.
SS.3.C.2.Pa.a: Recognize an action that contributes to the school community, such as respecting property, helping others, or participating in school activities.

SS.3.C.3.1: Identify the levels of government (local, state, federal).
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.3.In.a: Recognize leaders of local, state, and federal government, such as the mayor, governor, and president.
SS.3.C.3.Su.a: Recognize a leader of local, state, or federal government, such as the mayor, governor, or president.
SS.3.C.3.Pa.a: Recognize a leader in government, such as a president.

SS.3.C.3.2: Describe how government is organized at the local level.
Clarifications:
Examples are executive branch - mayor; legislative branch - city commission; judicial branch - county and circuit courts.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.3.In.b: Recognize that the local community has a group that makes the rules and the mayor is the leader.
SS.3.C.3.Su.b: Recognize that the local community has a group that makes the rules.
SS.3.C.3.Pa.b: Recognize that people in authority make rules in the community.

SS.3.C.3.3: Recognize that every state has a state constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.3.In.c: Recognize that every state has a set of written laws that its people must follow.
SS.3.C.3.Su.c: Recognize that every state has written laws.
SS.3.C.3.Pa.c: Recognize that states have laws.

SS.3.C.3.4: Recognize that the Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the land.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.C.3.In.d: Recognize that the Constitution is the set of laws that people in the United States must follow.
SS.3.C.3.Su.d: Recognize the Constitution is a set of written laws.
SS.3.C.3.Pa.d: Recognize that the United States has laws.

SS.3.E.1.1: Give examples of how scarcity results in trade.
Clarifications:
Examples are oil, video games, food.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.E.1.In.a: Identify that people can trade for products that are not available locally.
SS.3.E.1.Su.a: Recognize that people can trade for products that are not available locally.
SS.3.E.1.Pa.a: Recognize that people trade for items they want or need.

SS.3.E.1.2: List the characteristics of money.
Clarifications:
Examples are portable, divisible, recognizable, durable.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.E.1.In.b: Recognize characteristics of money, such as portable and recognizable.
SS.3.E.1.Su.b: Recognize a characteristic of money, such as portable.
SS.3.E.1.Pa.b: Recognize coins as money.

SS.3.E.1.3: Recognize that buyers and sellers interact to exchange goods and services through the use of trade or money.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.E.1.In.c: Recognize the roles of buyers and sellers in exchanging goods and services.
SS.3.E.1.Su.c: Recognize the roles of buyers and sellers in exchanging goods.
SS.3.E.1.Pa.c: Recognize that buyers trade money for goods.

SS.3.E.1.4: Distinguish between currencies used in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.E.1.In.d: Recognize forms of money used in the United States and one other country.
SS.3.E.1.Su.d: Recognize forms of money used in the United States.
SS.3.E.1.Pa.d: Recognize coins as money.

SS.3.G.1.1: Use thematic maps, tables, charts, graphs, and photos to analyze geographic information.
Clarifications:
Types of photographs may include satellite or aerial.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.1.In.a: Use a thematic map or chart to identify selected geographic information, such as land and body of water on a map or population on a chart.
SS.3.G.1.Su.a: Use a physical map to identify selected geographic information, such as land, water, and coastlines.
SS.3.G.1.Pa.a: Recognize personal location on a pictorial map.

SS.3.G.1.2: Review basic map elements (coordinate grid, cardinal and intermediate directions, title, compass rose, scale, key/legend with symbols) .
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.1.In.b: Identify elements on a map, such as key/legend, cardinal directions, and compass rose.
SS.3.G.1.Su.b: Recognize elements on a map, such as a picture key, cardinal directions, and title.
SS.3.G.1.Pa.b: Locate pictures or symbols on a drawing or map.

SS.3.G.1.3: Label the continents and oceans on a world map.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.1.In.c: Recognize selected continents and oceans on a world map.
SS.3.G.1.Su.c: Recognize a continent and an ocean on a map.
SS.3.G.1.Pa.c: Recognize land and water using a color key on a map.

SS.3.G.1.4: Name and identify the purpose of maps (physical, political, elevation, population).
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.1.In.d: Identify selected maps, such as a physical map and a political map.
SS.3.G.1.Su.d: Recognize a map, such as a physical map or a political map.
SS.3.G.1.Pa.d: Recognize personal location on a pictorial map.

SS.3.G.1.5: Compare maps and globes to develop an understanding of the concept of distortion.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.1.In.e: Identify differences between maps and globes.
SS.3.G.1.Su.e: Recognize differences between maps and globes.
SS.3.G.1.Pa.e: Recognize land and water using a color key on a map.

SS.3.G.1.6: Use maps to identify different types of scale to measure distances between two places.
Clarifications:
Examples are linear, fractional, word.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.1.In.f: Use maps to identify distances between two places, such as near or far, closer or farther, and next to.
SS.3.G.1.Su.f: Use maps to recognize distances between two places, such as near or far, and next to.
SS.3.G.1.Pa.f: Locate pictures or symbols on a drawing or map.

SS.3.G.2.1: Label the countries and commonwealths in North America (Canada, United States, Mexico) and in the Caribbean (Puerto Rico, Cuba, Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica).
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.2.In.a: Recognize North America, the United States, and Mexico on a map.
SS.3.G.2.Su.a: Recognize the United States on a map of North America.
SS.3.G.2.Pa.a: Recognize an outline map or image of the United States.

SS.3.G.2.2: Identify the five regions of the United States.
Clarifications:
(i.e., Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest, West)
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.2.In.b: Recognize north, south, east, and west as they relate to the regions of the United States.
SS.3.G.2.Su.b: Recognize north, south, east, and west in the United States.
SS.3.G.2.Pa.b: Recognize an outline map or image of the United States.

SS.3.G.2.3: Label the states in each of the five regions of the United States.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.2.In.c: Recognize selected states in each of the five regions of the United States.
SS.3.G.2.Su.c: Recognize selected states in the United States.
SS.3.G.2.Pa.c: Recognize Florida as the student’s state.

SS.3.G.2.4: Describe the physical features of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Clarifications:
Examples are lakes, rivers, oceans, mountains, deserts, plains, and grasslands.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.2.In.d: Recognize major physical features—such as lakes, rivers, oceans, mountains, deserts, and plains—of the United States and Canada, and Mexico and the Caribbean.
SS.3.G.2.Su.d: Recognize selected physical features of the United States, such as lakes, rivers, oceans, mountains, deserts, and plains.
SS.3.G.2.Pa.d: Recognize physical differences between two locations.

SS.3.G.2.5: Identify natural and man-made landmarks in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Clarifications:
(e.g. Grand Canyon, Gateway Arch, Mount Rushmore, Devil's Tower, Mt. Denali, Everglades, Niagara Falls)
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.2.In.e: Recognize major natural and man-made landmarks of the United States, such as the Grand Canyon, Gateway Arch, Mt. Rushmore, and the Everglades.
SS.3.G.2.Su.e: Recognize a major natural landmark of the United States, such as the Grand Canyon or the Everglades.
SS.3.G.2.Pa.e: Recognize physical differences between two locations.

SS.3.G.2.6: Investigate how people perceive places and regions differently by conducting interviews, mental mapping, and studying news, poems, legends, and songs about a region or area.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.2.In.f: Identify how people view places and regions differently by asking questions; using graphic organizers; and studying news, poems, legends, or songs about a region or area.
SS.3.G.2.Su.f: Recognize how people view places differently by asking questions; using graphic organizers; and studying news, poems, legends, or songs about a region or area.
SS.3.G.2.Pa.f: Recognize physical differences between two locations.

SS.3.G.3.1: Describe the climate and vegetation in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Clarifications:
(e.g., tundra, sandy soil, humidity, maritime climate)
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.3.In.a: Recognize differences in the climates and vegetation of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean, such as temperature, humidity, tundra, and soil.
SS.3.G.3.Su.a: Recognize selected differences in the climates and vegetation of the United States, such as temperature, humidity, tundra, and soil.
SS.3.G.3.Pa.a: Recognize differences in climates or vegetation.

SS.3.G.3.2: Describe the natural resources in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Clarifications:
(e.g., water, arable land, oil, phosphate, fish)
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.3.In.b: Recognize major natural resources—such as water, arable land, oil, phosphate, and fish—in the United States and Canada, and Mexico and the Caribbean.
SS.3.G.3.Su.b: Recognize selected natural resources—such as water, arable land, oil, phosphate, or fish—in the United States and Canada, and Mexico and the Caribbean.
SS.3.G.3.Pa.b: Recognize an example of a natural resource.

SS.3.G.4.1: Explain how the environment influences settlement patterns in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Clarifications:
Examples are settlements near water for drinking, bathing, cooking, agriculture and land for farming.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.4.In.a: Identify major ways environmental influences contribute to settlement patterns in the United States, such as settlement near water for drinking, bathing, and cooking; and settlement near land for farming.
SS.3.G.4.Su.a: Recognize a major way the environment influences settlement patterns in the United States, such as settlement near water for drinking, bathing, and cooking, or settlement near land for farming.
SS.3.G.4.Pa.a: Recognize an environmental influence that affects where people live.

SS.3.G.4.2: Identify the cultures that have settled the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.4.In.b: Recognize different cultures that have settled in the United States and Canada, and Mexico and the Caribbean.
SS.3.G.4.Su.b: Recognize that different cultures have settled in the United States and Canada, and Mexico and the Caribbean.
SS.3.G.4.Pa.b: Recognize a difference between cultures.

SS.3.G.4.3: Compare the cultural characteristics of diverse populations in one of the five regions of the United States with Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean.
Clarifications:
Examples are housing, music, transportation, food, recreation, language, holidays, beliefs and customs.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.4.In.c: Identify a cultural characteristic of a population in the United States and a population in Mexico, Canada, or the Caribbean.
SS.3.G.4.Su.c: Recognize a cultural characteristic of a population in the United States and a population in Mexico, Canada, or the Caribbean.
SS.3.G.4.Pa.c: Recognize a cultural characteristic of a population.

SS.3.G.4.4: Identify contributions from various ethnic groups to the United States.
Clarifications:
Examples are Native Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Africans, Asians, Europeans.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.3.G.4.In.d: Recognize contributions of an ethnic group to the United States, such as Native Americans or Africans.
SS.3.G.4.Su.d: Recognize a contribution of an ethnic group to the United States, such as Native Americans or Africans.
SS.3.G.4.Pa.d: Recognize a cultural characteristic of a population.

LAFS.3.RI.1.1 (Archived Standard): Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.1a: Answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.1b: Identify supporting details of an informational text read, read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively and orally.
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.1c: Ask questions to demonstrate understanding.

LAFS.3.RI.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.2a: Determine the main idea of text read, read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively and orally.
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.2b: Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.2c: Identify facts that an author uses to support a specific point or opinion.

LAFS.3.RI.1.3 (Archived Standard): Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.3a: Identify the sequence of events in an informational text.
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.3b: Identify the steps in a process in an informational text.
LAFS.3.RI.1.AP.3c: Identify the cause and effect relationships in an informational text.

LAFS.3.RI.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.4a: Determine the meaning of general academic words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.4b: Determine the meaning of domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

LAFS.3.RI.2.5 (Archived Standard): Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.5a: Identify and explain the purpose of a variety of text features (table of contents, index, glossary, charts, subheadings).
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.5b: Use text features (captions, maps, illustrations) to locate information relevant to a given topic or question.
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.5c: Use search tools (e.g., sidebars, icons, glossary, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic.

LAFS.3.RI.2.6 (Archived Standard): Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.6a: Identify the author’s point of view in an informational text.
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.6b: Identify own point of view about a topic.
LAFS.3.RI.2.AP.6c: Compare their own point of view to that of the author.

LAFS.3.RI.3.7 (Archived Standard): Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.7a: Use illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) in informational texts to answer questions.
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.7b: Identify information learned from illustrations and information learned from the words in an informational text .
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.7c: Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why and how key events occur).
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.7d: Within informational texts, locate or identify evidence in the text or graphics to support the central ideas.

LAFS.3.RI.3.8 (Archived Standard): Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.8a: Identify signal words that help determine the text structure in an informational text.
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.8b: Describe the connection between sentences and paragraphs in a text (order, comparison, cause/effect).

LAFS.3.RI.3.9 (Archived Standard): Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.9a: Compare the similarities of two or more texts or adapted texts on the same topic or by the same author.
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.9b: Contrast the differences of two texts or adapted texts on the same topic or by the same author.
LAFS.3.RI.3.AP.9c: When researching a topic, compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two informational texts on the same topic.

LAFS.3.RI.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.RI.4.AP.10a: Read or listen to and recount self- selected informational articles, history/social studies, science and technical texts.

LAFS.3.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
  2. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  3. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.
  4. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.1a: Provide evidence of being prepared for discussions on a topic or text through appropriate statements made during discussion.
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.1b: Ask questions to check understanding of information presented in collaborative discussions.
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.1c: Link personal ideas and comments to the ideas shared by others in collaborative discussions.
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.1d: Express ideas and understanding in light of collaborative discussions.

LAFS.3.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.2a: Determine the central message, lesson or moral of a text read aloud or presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively and orally.
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.2b: Determine the main idea of text read, read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively and orally.
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.2c: Identify supporting details of an informational text read, read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively and orally.

LAFS.3.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.SL.1.AP.3a: Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

LAFS.3.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.SL.2.AP.4a: Report on a topic or claim with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details.
LAFS.3.SL.2.AP.4b: Tell a story or recount an experience with logical sequence.
LAFS.3.SL.2.AP.4c: Elaborate on each fact or opinion given in support of a claim with relevant details.

LAFS.3.W.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
  1. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
  2. Provide reasons that support the opinion.
  3. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.1a: Introduce the topic or text within persuasive writing by stating an opinion.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.1b: Provide reasons or facts that support a stated opinion.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.1c: Use linking words and phrases that connect the opinions and reasons.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.1d: Provide a concluding statement or section.

LAFS.3.W.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  1. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
  3. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information.
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.2a: Introduce a topic and group related information together.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.2b: Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.2c: Provide a concluding statement or section to summarize the information presented.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.2d: Develop the topic (e.g., offer additional information that supports the topic) by using relevant facts, definitions and details.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.2e: Include text features (e.g., numbers, labels, diagrams, charts, graphics) to enhance clarity and meaning.

LAFS.3.W.1.3 (Archived Standard): Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
  1. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  2. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.
  3. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
  4. Provide a sense of closure.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.3a: Establish the situation by setting up the context for the story and introduce a narrator and/or characters.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.3b: Sequence events in writing that unfold naturally.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.3c: When appropriate, use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts and feelings to develop a story.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.3d: Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
LAFS.3.W.1.AP.3e: Provide a conclusion (concluding sentence, paragraph or extended ending) that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

LAFS.3.W.2.4 (Archived Standard): With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.4a: With guidance and support from adults, produce a permanent product in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task and purpose.

LAFS.3.W.2.5 (Archived Standard): With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5a: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for writing.
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5b: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for writing based on a literary topic (e.g., select a topic, draft outline, develop narrative).
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5c: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for writing (e.g., determine the topic, gather information, develop the topic, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5d: With guidance and support from adults, draft an outline in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task and purpose (e.g., to introduce real or imagined experiences or events, elaborate on experiences or events with details and techniques, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5e: With guidance and support from adults, draft an outline in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task and purpose (e.g., define purpose, state your opinion, gather evidence, create your argument, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5f: With guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing by revising.
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5g: With guidance and support from adults, draft an outline in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task and purpose (e.g., determine the topic, gather information, develop the topic, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5h: With guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing by revising (e.g., review product, strengthening story).
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.5i: With guidance and support from peers and adults, edit writing for clarity and meaning.

LAFS.3.W.2.6 (Archived Standard): With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.6a: With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (e.g., use Internet to gather information, word processing to generate and collaborate on writing).
LAFS.3.W.2.AP.6b: Develop keyboarding skills.

LAFS.3.W.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.7a: Follow steps to complete a short research project (e.g., determine topic, locate information on a topic, organize information related to the topic, draft a permanent product).

LAFS.3.W.3.8 (Archived Standard): Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8a: Recall relevant information from experiences for use in writing.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8b: Recall information from experiences for use in writing.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8c: Gather facts (e.g., highlight in text, quote or paraphrase from persuasive text or discussion) from print and/or digital sources.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8d: Gather information from stories (e.g., highlight in text, quote or paraphrase from text) from print and/or digital sources.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8e: Gather information (e.g., highlight, quote or paraphrase from source) from informational text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively and orally.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8f: Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic with the purpose of creating a permanent product (e.g., select/generate responses to form paragraph/essay).
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8g: Locate important points on a single topic from two informational texts or sources.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8h: Identify key details in an informational text.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8i: Take brief notes (e.g., graphic organizers, notes, labeling, listing) on sources.
LAFS.3.W.3.AP.8j: Sort evidence collected from print and/or digital sources into provided categories.

LAFS.3.W.4.10 (Archived Standard): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.3.W.4.AP.10a: Write routinely over shorter time frames (e.g., journal entry, letter, graphic organizer) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.
LAFS.3.W.4.AP.10b: Write routinely in a genre over extended time frames (planning, drafting, editing, revising, publishing) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.

MAFS.K12.MP.1.1 (Archived Standard):

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1 (Archived Standard):

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1 (Archived Standard): Use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
MAFS.K12.MP.6.1 (Archived Standard):

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.3.C.2.4: Identify classroom and school rules that promote health and disease prevention.
Clarifications:
Following rules for walking in hallways, keeping areas clean, listening to crossing guard, and bike safety.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.3.C.2.In.d: Identify selected classroom and school rules that promote health and disease prevention, such as walk/don’t run, wash hands, and keep personal areas clean, and listen to crossing guards.
HE.3.C.2.Su.d: Recognize classroom rules that promote health and disease prevention, such as walk/don’t run, wash hands, keep personal areas clean, and listen to school-crossing guards.
HE.3.C.2.Pa.d: Recognize a classroom rule that promotes health and disease prevention, such as wash hands, keep personal areas clean, or practice appropriate hygiene.




General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf.


General Information

Course Number: 7721014 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Elementary > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS SOC ST - 3
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 3



Educator Certifications

Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age 3 through Grade 3)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Primary Education (K-3)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


There are more than 237 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://www.cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/15472