The website is undergoing planned updates. Some features might be inaccessible during this time. Thank you for your patience!

LA.4.2.1.7


The student will identify and explain an author's use of descriptive, idiomatic, and figurative language (e.g., personification, similes, metaphors, symbolism), and examine how it is used to describe people, feelings, and objects;

Subject Area: NGSSS: Reading/Language Arts
Grade: 4
Strand: Literary Analysis
Standard: Fiction - The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the elements of a variety of fiction and literary texts to develop a thoughtful response to a literary selection.
Date Adopted or Revised: 01/07
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes

TEST ITEM SPECIFICATIONS

  • Reporting Category: Literary Analysis—Fiction/Nonfiction
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark will be assessed using: MC item(s)

  • Clarification :
    The student will identify and interpret the author’s use of descriptive or figurative language and will determine how the author’s use of language impacts meaning in grade-appropriate text.
  • Content Limits :
    Grade-level appropriate texts should contain clear examples of descriptive language (e.g., mood, imagery) and figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, personification).

    Common idioms and symbolism should not be assessed.
  • Content Focus :
    Descriptive Language (e.g., mood, imagery)
    Figurative Language (e.g., simile, metaphor, personification)
  • Text Attributes :
    Texts should be literary and may include, but are not limited to, fiction, nonfiction (e.g., biographies, diary entries), poetry, or drama.

    Other stimuli may include, but are not limited to, illustrations with captions, graphics, and charts.
  • Distractor Attributes :
    Distractors may include, but are not limited to
    • examples of descriptive language or figurative language drawn from the text but unrelated to the test item;
    • inaccurate interpretations of descriptive language or figurative language; and
    • plausible but incorrect distractors based on the text.
    Note: If two descriptive language distractors are used, they must be balanced with two figurative language distractors. The correct answer determines the content focus for the item.

    Note: Distractors may also include all descriptive language examples or all figurative language examples.

    Note: When assessing the author’s mood (e.g., happy, sad, angry) in a text, whenever possible, distractors should not be a list of words, but should include specific examples related to the text.

SAMPLE TEST ITEMS (4)

  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question: The sample item below is based on LearningToSing.pdf

    Read these words from “Learning to Sing.”

    “Put your heart into your singing and enjoy it,”

    What does it mean to put your heart into your singing?


  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

  • Test Item #: Sample Item 2
  • Question:

    The sample item below is based on AcrosstheBlueMountains.pdf

    Read this sentence from the passage.

    He liked their quiet life in the pale yellow house with its broad-leaved tree, its two swaying palms, and its cool veranda.

    What mood does the author create by using the phrase swaying palms?

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

  • Test Item #: Sample Item 3
  • Question: The sample item below is based on PlayAGame.pdf

    Read this sentence from the article. 

    Here’s a way to beat the road at its own game. 

    Why does the author compare the road to something to try to beat?

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

  • Test Item #: Sample Item 4
  • Question: The sample item below is based on PlayAGame.pdf

    Read this sentence from the article. 

    The road stretches like a rubber band for miles and miles. 

    Why does the author compare the road to a rubber band?

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice